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Old 08-12-2017, 10:47 PM
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Empathic or Empathetic?

Which do you say?

I say empathetic, not that I can relate.
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
Which do you say?

I say empathetic, not that I can relate.


You're discussing
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
Which do you say?

I say empathetic, not that I can relate.
when unsure of a word, I find it helps to put it into a sentence, as in:

PP is as empathic as a housebrick

vs

PP is as empathetic as a housebrick

See the difference?
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Old 08-13-2017, 01:10 AM
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when unsure of a word, I find it helps to put it into a sentence, as in:

PP is as empathic as a housebrick

vs

PP is as empathetic as a housebrick

See the difference?
Not in the meaning, no. And SOOOOOOO cruel!
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:02 AM
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You're disgusting
Fixed.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:22 AM
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Fixed.
Wes, always a couple of steps behind.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:24 AM
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Wes, always a couple of steps behind.
Sorry, I though that was your usual position.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:11 AM
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Empathic. Empathetic is illiterate, but unfortunately creeping into the lexicon, so is probably already considered idiomatic.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:36 AM
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You wouldn't say sympathic.......that sounds pathetic.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Ferraridoc View Post
Empathic. Empathetic is illiterate, but unfortunately creeping into the lexicon, so is probably already considered idiomatic.

https://www.grammarly.com/blog/empathetic/

Empathetic vs. Empathic
The words empathetic and empathic mean the same thing. Empathic is the older word, but not by much—it was first used in 1909, while the first recorded of use of empathetic is from 1932. Both words are derived from empathy, and you can use them interchangeably.

In scientific writing, empathic is more common. It’s also the term that people associate with New Age teaching and theories because it reminds them of “empath,” a word that hasn’t yet made it into the major English dictionaries.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/empathetic/

Empathetic vs. Empathic
The words empathetic and empathic mean the same thing. Empathic is the older word, but not by much—it was first used in 1909, while the first recorded of use of empathetic is from 1932. Both words are derived from empathy, and you can use them interchangeably.

In scientific writing, empathic is more common. It’s also the term that people associate with New Age teaching and theories because it reminds them of “empath,” a word that hasn’t yet made it into the major English dictionaries.
Which of your many schools taught you that?
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/empathetic/

Empathetic vs. Empathic
The words empathetic and empathic mean the same thing. Empathic is the older word, but not by much—it was first used in 1909, while the first recorded of use of empathetic is from 1932. Both words are derived from empathy, and you can use them interchangeably.

In scientific writing, empathic is more common. It’s also the term that people associate with New Age teaching and theories because it reminds them of “empath,” a word that hasn’t yet made it into the major English dictionaries.
Hmmm. Well, I don't like it! I don't have a reference to hand, but I'm pretty sure that journalism teaches "empathic" as the correct word in formal writing.
My son's Grade 4 teacher crossed out "empathic" and wrote in "empathetic" in one of his sentences - I wanted to have a few choice words! All this from someone who says "haitch" for h.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Ferraridoc View Post
All this from someone who says "haitch" for h.
Grammar: haitch or aitch?
So, is the letter H/h pronounced "haitch" or "aitch"? How do you spell it? Let's start with a little unpacking.

First, you won't find 'haitch' in the dictionary, only the correct spelling aitch. The name of the letter comes from Old French ache of the 1500s and first spelt so in English, when it was related to the Old English word ache, from æce. At this time it was pronounced "ache" or "aitch".

Then what occurred in the 1800s was that a peculiar thing happened, or should I say, 'appened. Men and women put on airs and began imitating the French practice of dropping the h- from the front of words, such as 'otel. 'orse, 'ouse, and 'ello 'arry! The English gentry called these bounders (19th-century slang) aitch-dropping types, who dropped their aitches.

Out of this wholesale lopping off of the normally aspirated aitches from words a la French came the (wh)ole mess of an hotel, an historic, an house corruption. And, thanks to all of this linguistic meddling came the inevitable backlash, the reinforcement of h-otel, h-orse, h-ouse, h-ello and H-arry.

As a result, aitch gained an h through folk etymology and many people made it h-aitch in both spelling and pronunciation. So, if you want to be correct, make it aitch in sound and spelling – but please be correct and make it 'a hotel' and 'a historic' while you are at it.

grammar haitch or aitch
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Ferraridoc View Post
Hmmm. Well, I don't like it! I don't have a reference to hand, but I'm pretty sure that journalism teaches "empathic" as the correct word in formal writing.

My son's Grade 4 teacher crossed out "empathic" and wrote in "empathetic" in one of his sentences - I wanted to have a few choice words! All this from someone who says "haitch" for h.


That's not as bad as when I ask patients having a barium swallow what their symptoms are and hear "something feels like it's stuck in my froat"
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
Grammar: haitch or aitch?
So, is the letter H/h pronounced "haitch" or "aitch"? How do you spell it? Let's start with a little unpacking.

First, you won't find 'haitch' in the dictionary, only the correct spelling aitch. The name of the letter comes from Old French ache of the 1500s and first spelt so in English, when it was related to the Old English word ache, from æce. At this time it was pronounced "ache" or "aitch".

Then what occurred in the 1800s was that a peculiar thing happened, or should I say, 'appened. Men and women put on airs and began imitating the French practice of dropping the h- from the front of words, such as 'otel. 'orse, 'ouse, and 'ello 'arry! The English gentry called these bounders (19th-century slang) aitch-dropping types, who dropped their aitches.

Out of this wholesale lopping off of the normally aspirated aitches from words a la French came the (wh)ole mess of an hotel, an historic, an house corruption. And, thanks to all of this linguistic meddling came the inevitable backlash, the reinforcement of h-otel, h-orse, h-ouse, h-ello and H-arry.

As a result, aitch gained an h through folk etymology and many people made it h-aitch in both spelling and pronunciation. So, if you want to be correct, make it aitch in sound and spelling – but please be correct and make it 'a hotel' and 'a historic' while you are at it.

grammar haitch or aitch
Quite interesting!
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:11 AM
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Talking

Geeez PP you know that shark week is on Discovery Channel.............😎
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Maranello550 View Post
Geeez PP you know that shark week is on Discovery Channel.............😎
So, which word do you use?
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aircon View Post
Grammar: haitch or aitch?
So, is the letter H/h pronounced "haitch" or "aitch"? How do you spell it? Let's start with a little unpacking.

First, you won't find 'haitch' in the dictionary, only the correct spelling aitch. The name of the letter comes from Old French ache of the 1500s and first spelt so in English, when it was related to the Old English word ache, from æce. At this time it was pronounced "ache" or "aitch".

Then what occurred in the 1800s was that a peculiar thing happened, or should I say, 'appened. Men and women put on airs and began imitating the French practice of dropping the h- from the front of words, such as 'otel. 'orse, 'ouse, and 'ello 'arry! The English gentry called these bounders (19th-century slang) aitch-dropping types, who dropped their aitches.

Out of this wholesale lopping off of the normally aspirated aitches from words a la French came the (wh)ole mess of an hotel, an historic, an house corruption. And, thanks to all of this linguistic meddling came the inevitable backlash, the reinforcement of h-otel, h-orse, h-ouse, h-ello and H-arry.

As a result, aitch gained an h through folk etymology and many people made it h-aitch in both spelling and pronunciation. So, if you want to be correct, make it aitch in sound and spelling – but please be correct and make it 'a hotel' and 'a historic' while you are at it.

grammar haitch or aitch
Interesting insight, I wasn't interested in English at school but now find the evolution of language fascinating
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:50 PM
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And another thing!

Will people stop saying "orientate"? There's no such bloody word!
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferraridoc View Post
Will people stop saying "orientate"? There's no such bloody word!
Rubbish!


https://www.dailywritingtips.com/do-...tate-yourself/

This is a common source of disagreement. Both “orient” and “orientate” are verbs meaning to align or position yourself; to work out where you are within a particular situation or environment. The origin of both words is the same : the Latin word oriens meaning “rising” and “east”, because of the rising sun.

Orient as a noun means the countries of the East, especially those of east Asia. Strictly speaking, then, to orient/orientate yourself means to align yourself to the east, although the verb now has the general sense of “to position yourself”.

In the UK, it is more common for people to say “orientate” whereas in the US, “orient” is more common. Writers in both countries sometimes bemoan the usage of the alternative word. In fact, both words are acceptable according to the dictionaries.

The Oxford English Dictionary and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary list “orient” and “orientate” as verbs meaning the same thing. Which one you choose to use really just comes down to local preference. To a UK reader, “orient” may well sound non-standard, whereas “orientate” may sound clumsy to a US reader. Other parts of the world will have their own preferences. The key thing to remember is that both forms of the verb are generally acceptable.

As an aside, the opposite of Orient (the noun) is “Occident” : the countries of the West. There is, however, no equivalent verb. You can neither “occident” nor “occidentate” yourself. The closest verb is occidentalize, meaning to conform to western ideas or customs.
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