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  #41  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:51 AM
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Amazing plane that flying pencil. Yup quite correct that Henry did a lot of work on Dornier flying boats. He was also quite involved with the Do-17 and Do-217 light bombers and incidentally probably tested them as dive bombers too.

Up to 1944 there was a regular exchange of surface blockade runners between Japan and Germany, but in early 1944 the last three to sail from Japan were hunted down off Brazil and sunk. U-boats kept up contact between the two Axis powers, but with a horrific loss rate and with less cargo capacity than surface ships.

Special high value cargoes needed an urgent courier service by 1944.

Prior to Barbarossa, Germany's invasion of Russia, a giant Blohm und Voss Bv222 Wiking flying boat had flown to Japanese held Sakhalin. After Barbaraossa however the Japanese were wary of triggering a war with the soviets so objected to overflights of the Soviet Union by aircraft in military markings.

In February 1944 three Ju-290 aircraft were withdrawn from military service with Feraufklarungsgruppe Nr.5 and civilianised. Each of these three aircraft received enlarged fuel tanks. they were assigned Deutsch Luft Hansa (DLH) markings, but in reality were operated by KG200.

Flugkapitan Rudolf Mayer made the first test flight to Ningxia, 300nm west of Beijing from Odessa in February 1944.

Oberluetnant Wolfgang Nebel from a special long range reconnaissance unit had been tasked to explore using another ultra long range aircraft, the Me-264 from Northern Finland, but it had an impractically long take off run. The Junkers Ju-290 was the obvious alternative.

Nebel selected a number of civil test pilots to operate these missions with civilianised Ju-290 aircraft. they included Flugkapitans Karl Patin, Henry ("Ivan") Quenzler, Erich Warzich, and Matthias. Odessa fell to the Soviets mid April and until August 1944 flights were still operated from Bulgaria which was nominally neutral.

The most significant source for this story was the interrogation of a Luftwaffe photographer attached to the long range reconnaissance unit FAGr.5 at Mont de Marsan. Unteroffizer Wolf Baumgart, as a prisoner of war, was interrogated in August 1944 by the US Ninth Air Force, cited in A.P.W.I.U. Report 44/1945. Baumgart's accounts were apparently corroborated by a more senior Luftwaffe officer whom I have yet to identify.

Last edited by Kiwiguy; 04-03-2009 at 09:53 AM. Reason: spelling corrections
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  #42  
Old 04-03-2009, 11:47 AM
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Re Quenzler

Thanks so much for all this info about Kommando Nebel and Henry Quenzler. He talked mostly about his hatred of the Nazi's and his flight test work at Dornier. Very little about his life other than as a test pilot and engineer.....passionate about both. He had such frustration for not being able to translate his creations into hardware that he developed an ulcer. he amazed me with his mentality, he could come within two percent of the empty weight of a large airplane by mentally calculating the square feet of the airframe and figuring the weight of it. he wanted to build a small flying boat powered by two alcohol fueled Wankle rotary's that could fly the Atlantic. He knew how long the takeoff run with a full load would be on Lake Washington, " It would miss the bridge."
Thanks again for your information on my old friend.
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  #43  
Old 04-03-2009, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by imported_ryalex View Post
Probably P-51, although in my old "Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe" flight sim I liked the ME-262.
You mean the early prototype where they put a piston engine in the nose because the jet engines were not ready? I heard it was "chust a leetle" underpowered -

If we are talking German pistons here, I would suggest the Focke-Wulf 190 D9.
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  #44  
Old 04-03-2009, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Kiwiguy View Post
Amazing plane that flying pencil. Yup quite correct that Henry did a lot of work on Dornier flying boats. He was also quite involved with the Do-17 and Do-217 light bombers and incidentally probably tested them as dive bombers too.

Up to 1944 there was a regular exchange of surface blockade runners between Japan and Germany, but in early 1944 the last three to sail from Japan were hunted down off Brazil and sunk. U-boats kept up contact between the two Axis powers, but with a horrific loss rate and with less cargo capacity than surface ships.

Special high value cargoes needed an urgent courier service by 1944.

Prior to Barbarossa, Germany's invasion of Russia, a giant Blohm und Voss Bv222 Wiking flying boat had flown to Japanese held Sakhalin. After Barbaraossa however the Japanese were wary of triggering a war with the soviets so objected to overflights of the Soviet Union by aircraft in military markings.

In February 1944 three Ju-290 aircraft were withdrawn from military service with Feraufklarungsgruppe Nr.5 and civilianised. Each of these three aircraft received enlarged fuel tanks. they were assigned Deutsch Luft Hansa (DLH) markings, but in reality were operated by KG200.

Flugkapitan Rudolf Mayer made the first test flight to Ningxia, 300nm west of Beijing from Odessa in February 1944.

Oberluetnant Wolfgang Nebel from a special long range reconnaissance unit had been tasked to explore using another ultra long range aircraft, the Me-264 from Northern Finland, but it had an impractically long take off run. The Junkers Ju-290 was the obvious alternative.

Nebel selected a number of civil test pilots to operate these missions with civilianised Ju-290 aircraft. they included Flugkapitans Karl Patin, Henry ("Ivan") Quenzler, Erich Warzich, and Matthias. Odessa fell to the Soviets mid April and until August 1944 flights were still operated from Bulgaria which was nominally neutral.

The most significant source for this story was the interrogation of a Luftwaffe photographer attached to the long range reconnaissance unit FAGr.5 at Mont de Marsan. Unteroffizer Wolf Baumgart, as a prisoner of war, was interrogated in August 1944 by the US Ninth Air Force, cited in A.P.W.I.U. Report 44/1945. Baumgart's accounts were apparently corroborated by a more senior Luftwaffe officer whom I have yet to identify.
I'm fascinated by your material and uncovering Quenzler's name in the KG200 roster. Please, where can I access this information. Thanks for your posting this as I have fond memories of Quenzler.
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  #45  
Old 04-03-2009, 08:13 PM
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There's no roster of KG200 pilots as such. Indeed all the Luftwaffe personnel files had been stored in a coal mine close to a town now called Walbrzych (then known as Wenceslas) upper Silesia. These and other documents were shifted by the trainloads via Prague to Linz in March 1945. The official version is that they were burned in an orgy of destruction on bonfires at Linz during April 1945 and no longer exist.

The truth more likely however is that the documents were seized by American forces and shipped under Operation LUSTY (acronym for LUftwaffe Secret TechnologY) to Le Havre where 200 tons of Nazi material were shipped to New Orleans.

Author Robert Forsyth has unearthed some of the story about civillian test pilots employed by Sonderkommando Nebel for his book Amerika Bomber Me-264. He has consulted wartime POW interrogations to unearth fragmentary knowledge of these flights to "Manchuria." In reality it should be called Inner Mongolia, but the phrase Manchuria, or Manchurian flights has stuck.

In February 1944 when KG200 took over all long range special missions, Hitler tasked the head of his own VIP flight Hauptman Braun to form a Japan Kommando flying an air bridge to Japan. This unit was also known as 14/TGS.4 (or 14 Transportgeschwader 4).

A Ju-290 A-5 aircraft was requisitioned and modified at the DLH maintenance facility on Rusnye aerodrome at Prague. Not at the nearby Junkers factory in Prague. Deutsche Luft Hansa pilot Flugkapitan Rudolf Mayr was placed in charge of the Manchurian flight operation. Aircraft were stripped of armaments, military markings and were given civil DLH markings.

A War Ministry report (AIR 40/203) detailed in mid October 1944, a POW gave information under interrogation that since the beginning of 1944, there had been "regular air travel between Germany and Japan established for the transport of high officials flown by old "experienced Hansa pilots."

Pilots thought to have flown these missions to Ningxia included Flugkapitan Nebel, Flugkapitan Mattias (died April 1946 in Soviet captivity), Flugkapitan Erich Warsitz (died of stroke at the age of 76 years 12 July 1983 at Barbengo Switzerland), Flugkapitan Hermann (Henry) Quenzler (Dornier Test Pilot), and test pilot Karl Patin (possibly Engineering Dr Albert Karl Patin brought to USA in 1945).

Trial flights began with Ju-290A-5 werke # J900170 Luftwaffe code KR+LA. This aircraft also had KG200 codes 9V+DH. It was destroyed by air raids at Reichlin in 1945. Itís fuel capacity was increased and for long range operations, MTOW was increased from the Ju-290ís standard 41.3 tons to 45 tons.

In March 1944 three other Ju290 aircraft were transferred to Versuchsverband OKL carrying Luftwaffe codes T9+, thence they were stripped of all weaponry and civilianised for Deutsch Luft Hansa (DLH) service on flights to China. Modification included fitting fuel tanks for 23,800 litres. Each of the aircraft also then received civil registrations.

These three aircraft were Ju-290A-9 werke # J900183, former Luftwaffe code KR+LN. From February 1944 this aircraft became T9+VK. It was attacked on the ground at Finsterwalde in April 1944 and scrapped at Travenmunde in September 1944.

Also Ju-290A-9 werke # J900182, former Luftwaffe code KR+LM. From February 1944 this aircraft became T9+UK. This aircraft was lost whilst on the ground to strafing fire by four Soviet flown Hurricanes near the village of Utta, near Astrakhan in July 1944. This was thought to have been an ambushed rendesvous arranged by the NKVD.

Ju-290 A7 werke # J900185, former Luftwaffe code KR+LP was the third conversion to become T9+WK. Later in it's career it was attacked over the southern eastern front in May 1944 and returned from the mission beyond all hope of repair.

On 2 September 1944 Ju-290A-3 werke # J900163 Luftwaffe code PI+PQ was ordered to be converted for a mission to China to carry VIP Ulrich Kessler, but work on the aircraft was interrupted by general anti Nazi uprisings in Bulgaria where the aircraft was to fly from. The aircraft was eventually blown up in May 1945 to prevent it's capture.

Henry sounds like he was an amazing man and it is a pity more of his life story has not been told.

Unfortunately many of the former Nazi scientists and engineers were brought to USA in secrecy and were compelled by various factors, not least being Cold War tensions to keep quiet and suppress knowledge of their wartime careers.

As these veterans have departed to meet their makers their contributions to history have been lost and their amazing deeds have become denegrated as pure myth.

Glad if I could help fill in some blanks - Simon
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  #46  
Old 04-03-2009, 10:15 PM
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Simon, I cannot tell you how this exchange of information has awakened me. It takes me back to a unique time that will never return. In the 50's and 60's when I was working on the KC-135 and 707 I met and worked with those who at one time during the war were allies from England and at the same time were enemies from Germany. Then later on there were the Poles who hated both the Germans and the Russians at the same time. I trained these people who were coming in from Europe to work as engineers at Boeing and I saw a cross section of all sides. The stories that were related to me were hair-curling and amazing and there were times that some of my Polish immigrant/ students were in tears from anger at how the Russians treated them. I was quickly educated in what really happened during and after WW2 over there. Then there was Henry Quenzler with whom I worked as a cohort on the 707 and who talked only about his flying and engineering while at Dornier. And now you have illuminated another facet about his history that I never knew. He was unique in that he wasn't involved politically. He only said that he hated Hitler and the Nazis and wanted nothing to do with them. How he survived is told in his obituary that he did what he could only do to stay alive and that was to work with aircraft. Now to learn more about him after he is gone is sad in a way because I'm certain that had I known about his being in KG200 and had asked that he probably would have told me. We had lunch together many times but he always talked about aeronautical engineering flying boats, and the "Great stupidity" that the 707 was. Also, of course, his favorite airplane, the DO-335.
I am impressed and amazed at the vast amount of information about KG200 that you have garnered. It is invaluable. I'm sure that some of the myth went with Henry Quenzler when he died.
Thanks.
Bob
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  #47  
Old 04-04-2009, 12:37 AM
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Bob that is perhaps the magic of aviation that aviation people around the world have a common love of flying that breaks down national barriers. The Nazis were elected by only 30% of the population before Hitler declared marshall law (after Reichstag fire).

I had a Hungarian friend who fought for the SS on the Eastern front. I remember once naively trying to ask him to explain to me why Nazi ideology appealed and whether there was some way I could appreciate it from a rational perspective like fear of the Bolsheviks etc.

My friend growled at me that nobody has the right to ever tell another person how to live. I guess that says it all whatever ideology it is... Right wing or left wing.

He has two daughters still living in USA. I am curious if he ever told them. I've read that Henry lost his son and his wife.

Cheers my friend

Last edited by Kiwiguy; 04-04-2009 at 12:39 AM.
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  #48  
Old 04-04-2009, 01:00 AM
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Bob that is perhaps the magic of aviation that aviation people around the world have a common love of flying that breaks down national barriers. The Nazis were elected by only 30% of the population before Hitler declared marshall law (after Reichstag fire).

I had a Hungarian friend who fought for the SS on the Eastern front. I remember once naively trying to ask him to explain to me why Nazi ideology appealed and whether there was some way I could appreciate it from a rational perspective like fear of the Bolsheviks etc.

My friend growled at me that nobody has the right to ever tell another person how to live. I guess that says it all whatever ideology it is... Right wing or left wing.

He has two daughters still living in USA. I am curious if he ever told them. I've read that Henry lost his son and his wife.

Cheers my friend
True, Simon. My son and I hosted a bunch of Russian pilots and thier translators in 1990 when Russia was sliding down then and they sent the air show people over in that six engined transport. They are wonderful people and we had a blast with them but I would hate to have a conflict with them. Henry's wife died in 1980 and his only son, Fritz, was lost at sea. Sad. Henry died at age 93. That Hitler could have driven the entire German nation to do his evil bidding will forever puzzle me...except that his timing was right and the Germans were waiting for a type of Messiah.
Take care and thanks again,
Bob
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  #49  
Old 04-10-2009, 11:26 PM
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Thought you might like this quick snap from a recent Smithsonian trip
A model of that exact airplane sits on my dresser. #102
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Old 04-11-2009, 12:17 AM
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Maybe a different viewpoint and back to the original question. My father flew nearly all the fighters from WW-II, and went into combat in the P-47D with the 86 FBG. He flew the P-36, P-38, P-39, P-40, P-43, P-47, Spitfire, P-51 and P-80 post-war, and his last operational aircraft was the F-84 straight wing. When asked what his favorite aircraft from the WW-II era was, he said the P-38. The combination of counter-rotating props, tricycle landing gear and the smooth, turbo-charged V12 engines won him over, even if it did have a yoke instead of a stick. Plus it was one of the prettiest aircraft that ever flew.

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Old 04-11-2009, 11:53 AM
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Maybe a different viewpoint and back to the original question. My father flew nearly all the fighters from WW-II, and went into combat in the P-47D with the 86 FBG. He flew the P-36, P-38, P-39, P-40, P-43, P-47, Spitfire, P-51 and P-80 post-war, and his last operational aircraft was the F-84 straight wing. When asked what his favorite aircraft from the WW-II era was, he said the P-38. The combination of counter-rotating props, tricycle landing gear and the smooth, turbo-charged V12 engines won him over, even if it did have a yoke instead of a stick. Plus it was one of the prettiest aircraft that ever flew.

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I have to agree with your father, the P-38 was a beautiful airplane and according to Gen Jimmy Doolitle it was the best all around fighter. I have also heard that the p-47 was best but who cares, they were both great airplanes.
I knew and flew with an ex-'38 pilot named Larry Blummer who was a P-38 ace and flew in the 9th Air Force out of England and France. He was the more than typical fighter pilot; rough , aggressive, irreverant, individualistic, etc. He used up 4 P-38's, all named " Scrap Iron-1,2,3,4". In his last, " Scrap Iron IV", he shot down 5 FW-190's in less than ten minutes in a fight over a German airfield. I've told his story last year in another thread so I won't repeat myself. He also was jumped by a Spitfire over France and promptly shot it down. He had a cigar box full of decorations that he kept in his dining room and relived WW2 on the drop of a word, the greatest thing that ever happened to this tough North Dakota farm boy.
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Old 04-11-2009, 12:52 PM
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Bob- That is the funny thing about pilots who served only during wartime. It was the biggest thing that happened to them in their lives. They are the ones who go to the unit reunions year after year to relive the glory days. My father was in the AAF/USAF for 32 years and the war was just a small part of his flying and career. He only went to one 86 FBG reunion, and that was an excuse to get me to take him to the AF Museum. Unfortunately he became ill the last two days there and died a week later at age 82.

The P-38 was an amazing aircraft and most people do not realize it could out-turn a Spifire through use of maneuvering flaps and J models and later had hydraulically boosted ailerons to make maneuvering easier. The
P-38 was not well suited to the high altitude escort role because of insufficient cockpit heat and defrosting. It also had a slow initial roll rate, which allowed German fighters to disengage too easily if they saw the P-38 coming. It excelled at low to medium altitude combat, though, in North Africa, Italy, and the Pacific and its concentrated firepower really knocked out a target quickly.

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Old 04-11-2009, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by tazandjan View Post
Bob- That is the funny thing about pilots who served only during wartime. It was the biggest thing that happened to them in their lives. They are the ones who go to the unit reunions year after year to relive the glory days. My father was in the AAF/USAF for 32 years and the war was just a small part of his flying and career. He only went to one 86 FBG reunion, and that was an excuse to get me to take him to the AF Museum. Unfortunately he became ill the last two days there and died a week later at age 82.

The P-38 was an amazing aircraft and most people do not realize it could out-turn a Spifire through use of maneuvering flaps and J models and later had hydraulically boosted ailerons to make maneuvering easier. The
P-38 was not well suited to the high altitude escort role because of insufficient cockpit heat and defrosting. It also had a slow initial roll rate, which allowed German fighters to disengage too easily if they saw the P-38 coming. It excelled at low to medium altitude combat, though, in North Africa, Italy, and the Pacific and its concentrated firepower really knocked out a target quickly.

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God Bless your dad for all that he did. I hope that you get all this written down because it is quite a story. Blummer's story substantiates your comments, Terry. His melee over the airfield was from 1500 feet to 10,000 as he looped in and out of the fight shooting airplanes down at the bottom and then at the top. His first victim was milling around low over the airfield when Larry arrived at the end of a diving approach. He said that he caught the FW in the corner of his eye coming in at 90 deg. and instinctively squeezed off a burst and flew through the debris of the disintegrated fighter. He then pulled up into a loop and encountered another on the way up and shot him down. Continuing the loops he shot three more down and realized that he was still at war emergency power and low on fuel so he made a pass over the field and shot up some more airplanes and a hangar and left with his group. If I remember correctly they lost three airplanes but shot down 17 of the 30+ enemy aircraft that had enticed two of his group over to an ambush. Larry had a temper and loved to fight( not always in an airplane) and the thought of the Germans playing them for suckers enraged him and went in to kick ass.
Every P-38 pilot that I met complained bitterly about the lack of heat in the cockpit and having ice all over everything inside. BUT they loved the close grouped firepower and when they hit something, in Larry's words, "It disappeared."
He loved to strafe with it and lost one airplane by going down into a valley in Germany to shoot up a column of tanks and vehicles. The Germans had set up 88's on the ridges and let him have it as came down. He was quickly hit and set on fire. As he climbed for altitude to bail out , the right engine came off the airplane and he was able to bail out safely. He landed behind the lines and evaded capture by crawling through foliage and digging out holes in which to hide. He made it to the British lines in rags.
He was quite a guy and fun to chat with. He died two years ago at 85.
I'm now 82 3/4 and in the 75th grade and hope I can keep things going for at least 15 more.
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  #54  
Old 04-11-2009, 04:25 PM
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Bob- Keep it up. I Intend to live a lot longer myself and will be 62 this year. Your friend lived through some real adventures. Getting shot down then was bad, and it is even worse now. His war lasted four years, mine lasted 40 days. Quite a difference

You might enjoy this book. I bought a copy for my father and believe Blummer is in it. There were a lot fewer ETO Lightning aces than P-47 or P-51 aces because there were a lot fewer aircraft. They fought early, too, so the odds were usually stacked against them. A very high percentage of the early MTO P-38 pilots flying out of North Africa were killed. I bought my father a ton of P-38 books becasue he really loved that airplane, even though he went to war in a P-47D. I should also post the photo of my dad inside the cowling of his P-47D. He probably weighed 120 lbs when the photo was taken.

http://www.amazon.com/P-38-Lightning...9484358&sr=1-1

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Old 04-11-2009, 04:38 PM
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The Germans called it the "FORK TAILED DEVIL"
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Old 04-11-2009, 05:01 PM
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The Germans called it the "FORK TAILED DEVIL"
I'll try to remember the German version..
" Der Gabelshwantze Teufel" My late and good friend Lew Morse was a B-24 pilot in the 15th and we worked together for a long time at Boeing in Industrial Engineering trying to set up a training program. He got to chatting with one of the IE types and of course it segued to the flying days in the war and Lew mentioned being escorted home by a P-38 after they had been heavily damaged in a raid on Ploesti. The engineer asked Lew what he flew and mentioned how he had done that a couple of times for damaged B-24's. They got to trading info and dates and when Lew brought in a picture, it turned out that the guy flying the P-38 was the very guy he was talking to, Don Huntsman.
Unlike Larry Blumer, Lew Morse wasn't a war lover. He had some awfully tough incidents and never was comfortable with the memories.
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Old 04-11-2009, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by tazandjan View Post
Bob- Keep it up. I Intend to live a lot longer myself and will be 62 this year. Your friend lived through some real adventures. Getting shot down then was bad, and it is even worse now. His war lasted four years, mine lasted 40 days. Quite a difference

You might enjoy this book. I bought a copy for my father and believe Blummer is in it. There were a lot fewer ETO Lightning aces than P-47 or P-51 aces because there were a lot fewer aircraft. They fought early, too, so the odds were usually stacked against them. A very high percentage of the early MTO P-38 pilots flying out of North Africa were killed. I bought my father a ton of P-38 books becasue he really loved that airplane, even though he went to war in a P-47D. I should also post the photo of my dad inside the cowling of his P-47D. He probably weighed 120 lbs when the photo was taken.

http://www.amazon.com/P-38-Lightning...9484358&sr=1-1

Taz
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Taz, I misspelled Larry's name. It was LARRY BLUMER. He ended up as a captain with 7 victories. I'll have to dig up some pictures of him and us. My favorite story about Blumer was how he had the radios removed from the area behind the seat prior to a sweep over eastern France. As he told it." What a nice surprise when I turned to get lined up on the strip, THERE was my cute little blonde French girl friend standing in the tall grass waiting for me with a little basket. Well, she scampered up the stinger that just happened to deployed and hopped in and we went on a joy ride and had a picnic in a field on the way back." He had pictures too. Lots of stories and you're right, Terry, the war was the only thing in his life. He bought a P-38 in the 60's and kept it at Thun Field and flew it only once when it was up at Paine Field . He was still pretty good.He was 27 when he got out of cadets...seven years older then his cohorts.
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Old 04-11-2009, 09:47 PM
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In addition to the Mosquito and the other types I mentioned in reply #12 above, I have to add an aircraft which never entered service, but still gets my vote as the most beautiful aircraft ever built, the Republic XF-12 Rainbow.

Conceived for a USAAF contract for a high-altitude, long-range reconnaisance aircraft, Republic went in a different direction than the competition, Hughes' XF-11. Republic decided to make the Rainbow large enough to carry an on-board photo lab, so that the images could be processed before the aircraft even returned to base!

The result was probably the fastest 4-engined piston aircraft ever built, with a cruising speed of over 450 MPH. As with a lot of other late-war contracts, this one was cancelled when WW II ended and a surplus of B-29s were available to be converted to the same role rather inexpensively. Only 2 were built and both eventually crashed.

If the Rainbow had entered military service, there were several airlines interested in a commercial version called the RC-2, and ads were prepared for both American and Pan American. But of course the cancellation of the military contract put an end to that.

The delightful website http://www.madoc.us/profiles.html has some hypothetical color schemes for Rainbows, both military and commercial.
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Old 04-11-2009, 10:07 PM
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Full Name: Robert Parks
Posts: 3,932
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Rainbow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorrari View Post
In addition to the Mosquito and the other types I mentioned in reply #12 above, I have to add an aircraft which never entered service, but still gets my vote as the most beautiful aircraft ever built, the Republic XF-12 Rainbow.

Conceived for a USAAF contract for a high-altitude, long-range reconnaisance aircraft, Republic went in a different direction than the competition, Hughes' XF-11. Republic decided to make the Rainbow large enough to carry an on-board photo lab, so that the images could be processed before the aircraft even returned to base!

The result was probably the fastest 4-engined piston aircraft ever built, with a cruising speed of over 450 MPH. As with a lot of other late-war contracts, this one was cancelled when WW II ended and a surplus of B-29s were available to be converted to the same role rather inexpensively. Only 2 were built and both eventually crashed.

If the Rainbow had entered military service, there were several airlines interested in a commercial version called the RC-2, and ads were prepared for both American and Pan American. But of course the cancellation of the military contract put an end to that.

The delightful website http://www.madoc.us/profiles.html has some hypothetical color schemes for Rainbows, both military and commercial.
Beautiful, fast, and sexy, BUT as an airliner it wouldn't have worked. That bullet shaped fuselage was not shaped to carry a lot of people in a long tube that you must use to achieve REVENUE. The R-4360 was an absolute nightmare and, as it did in the Stratocruiser, would have killed the Rainbow with high maintenance and operational costs. A turbo prop version with a more cost effective fuselage would have worked for a while until the swept wing things arrived and then it would have disappeared anyway.
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  #60  
Old 04-16-2009, 01:49 AM
Five Time F1 World Champ
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Join Date: Jun 2006
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what about the Thunderbolt?
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