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  #1  
Old 08-15-2015, 05:59 AM
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Used to road race in Italy. Now all about building and riding fixed gears in time trial spec.

Favourite brand: Bianchi

http://engine.pixelplus.netuse.gr/fi..._t_2_18281.JPG

Favourite cyclists: Gianni Bugno/Marco Pantani/Bradley Wiggins
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  #2  
Old 08-15-2015, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Igor Ound View Post
Used to road race in Italy. Now all about building and riding fixed gears in time trial spec.

Favourite brand: Bianchi

http://engine.pixelplus.netuse.gr/fi..._t_2_18281.JPG

Favourite cyclists: Gianni Bugno/Marco Pantani/Bradley Wiggins
Nice TT bike, big one! But it's not a fixie and it's got non-Italian components. IMO, all CF Campy would look and work nicer on the road.

Do you have access to an oval?
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Old 08-15-2015, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by 4th_gear View Post
Nice TT bike, big one! But it's not a fixie and it's got non-Italian components. IMO, all CF Campy would look and work nicer on the road.

Do you have access to an oval?
Pls don't call them fixies! At least not when they're proper track bikes. You mean it would look better like this? http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-159DrEc6jx...78092982_n.jpg

I agree in that case but Campagnolo has lost a bit of ground regarding top notch components at good prices, as has Bianchi, which is not even really Italian anymore. Still both look great.
I could use London's Olympic park's velodrome if I wanted but not my thing for now. Prefer to train in parks on a track bike with front brake and aero bars and after having put on weight in the last few months I'm really slow atm. If the road is flat fixed gears are usually faster than proper TT bikes, though, as they can be more aerodynamic, have fewer components and friction and weigh less.
Right now I'm deciding on setting up the bike in a UCI legal spec or not to give a damn about it.
Main difference being the saddle setback which is much more comfortable as forward as possible and slightly tilted downwards, although not UCI legal. But whatever.
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Old 08-15-2015, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Igor Ound View Post
Pls don't call them fixies! At least not when they're proper track bikes.
Sorry, I couldn't resist the poke.

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You mean it would look better like this? http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-159DrEc6jx...78092982_n.jpg
That's an improvement but then it reminds me more of a "concept vehicle" than a practical or "comfortable" "production model". So perhaps something more in between?

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I agree in that case but Campagnolo has lost a bit of ground regarding top notch components at good prices, as has Bianchi, which is not even really Italian anymore. Still both look great.
Yes, Campy gear can be expensive but they have very good 2nd, 3rd tier stuff at very competitive prices. Dura Ace is not cheap. Good CF frames are also almost all made in Taiwan these days but we should consider design and spirit. Shimano is mainly a marketing conglomerate. They buy their way into equipping all the off-the-rack bikes, will do that to own the whole market and more. There will come a point when they won't care about bikes like Bianchi TT bikes or even the Tour, because Shimano is a global enterprise with fingers in broader business interests. Whereas Campagnolo is all and only about cycling. I can afford it so I help Campy in a small way to stay in the market.

IMO, the Dura Ace gear on the Bianchi is quite unsightly, does not match anything, has no artistic merit.

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I could use London's Olympic park's velodrome if I wanted but not my thing for now. Prefer to train in parks on a track bike with front brake and aero bars and after having put on weight in the last few months I'm really slow atm. If the road is flat fixed gears are usually faster than proper TT bikes, though, as they can be more aerodynamic, have fewer components and friction and weigh less.
I rode a cheap fixed wheel trainer on the road when I was in college. The problem with that, aside from the dodgy braking part, was the constant disruption to my cadence. I had to constantly slow, speed up and stop a lot. I also had to ride a smaller gear to make it usable and safe so it was a bit like a mule's exercise.. plodding, at times cantankerous, at times frightening. It did help me get used to non-stop cranking and made me smoother but I would have opted for an oval if we had one.

Here's a very useful tip if you want to shed pounds quickly. Do enough miles to get reasonably fit and then do regular intervals on the bike, 1-hour sessions on an oval would work very well. Your body sheds weight like crazy if you do intervals regularly but DO NOT PERFORM intervals on a fixed wheel, on public roads.

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Right now I'm deciding on setting up the bike in a UCI legal spec or not to give a damn about it.
Main difference being the saddle setback which is much more comfortable as forward as possible and slightly tilted downwards, although not UCI legal. But whatever.
The forward position suits such a bike but is very aggressive and awful for the inevitable hill on the road (park?). Unless you have a flat, all left hand turn course (UK) without "traffic" issues, you might be very disappointed. My old fixed wheel trainer was a converted U08 complete with fenders. The idea was not to go the fastest but to get used to spinning and riding smooth. If you want to go fast (in a safe way) you must have a controlled course and the oval is the best way.

Otherwise I assume you are doing it for health and fitness so I think you should ride whatever is comfortable for the course and style of riding you intend. If you still want to ride fixed on the road, an old road frame with home-brew fixed gears would look and be way cooler than the latest TT frame and high end stuff.

You would "wear your bike" rather than have it wear you.
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Old 08-15-2015, 03:08 PM
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I'd like to do TT's and duathlon on the fixed bike so training already pretty hard (hard enough to make my stomach go upside down) and pretty fast. No matter lack of rear brake, no ability to stop pedalling and if it wasn't enough, double strap toe clips. Don't use clipless as to simulate a duathlon I just quickly lock the bike and continue running. Also pretty serious gear here, no vintage steel. All carbon and aluminium parts I assemble myself. Only steel on my bike is probably spokes, cartridge bearings, few bolts and chain.
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Old 08-15-2015, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Igor Ound View Post
I'd like to do TT's and duathlon on the fixed bike so training already pretty hard (hard enough to make my stomach go upside down) and pretty fast. No matter lack of rear brake, no ability to stop pedalling and if it wasn't enough, double strap toe clips. Don't use clipless as to simulate a duathlon I just quickly lock the bike and continue running. Also pretty serious gear here, no vintage steel. All carbon and aluminium parts I assemble myself. Only steel on my bike is probably spokes, cartridge bearings, few bolts and chain.
I compliment you on your health goals.

Duathlons are difficult for pure cyclists though, as the muscles employed in running and cycling are mutually incompatible. The same goes for swimming with regard to these 2 sports. I have a great deal of respect for such athletes but I have not tried to combine competitive running with cycling.

If you get serious with TTs, you might want to focus on it instead. Running would prove at least partially counterproductive to your cycling interests. You can still do it recreationally but when done closely together, the two disciplines are like cats and dogs when you go from one directly to the other in an event and are in conflict with regards to muscle development.
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Old 08-15-2015, 08:35 PM
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I was offered this bike for $1200 and there's room. The thing weighs nothing.

Keep in mind, I'm 5'11, 210 and plan to ride it on the bike path. I have a Trek hybrid now.

Thoughts?
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Old 08-16-2015, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by 4th_gear View Post
I compliment you on your health goals.

Duathlons are difficult for pure cyclists though, as the muscles employed in running and cycling are mutually incompatible. The same goes for swimming with regard to these 2 sports. I have a great deal of respect for such athletes but I have not tried to combine competitive running with cycling.

If you get serious with TTs, you might want to focus on it instead. Running would prove at least partially counterproductive to your cycling interests. You can still do it recreationally but when done closely together, the two disciplines are like cats and dogs when you go from one directly to the other in an event and are in conflict with regards to muscle development.
That's why a more forward saddle position is preferred in triathlons and duathlons. To work a more similar combination of muscles to running, and to make transitions smoother. Only problem is that this position produces less power and is then better with lower gears.
Btw I decided not to give a damn about UCI legal position mainly because in UK TTs often don't care about it and second but no less important, because my manhood suffers too much with a max 3 degrees forward saddle tilt
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Old 08-16-2015, 05:32 AM
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I was offered this bike for $1200 and there's room. The thing weighs nothing.

Keep in mind, I'm 5'11, 210 and plan to ride it on the bike path. I have a Trek hybrid now.

Thoughts?
Looks good and pretty sure you could get some good money back on ebay if you split it. Have a look at how much a Dura ace from that era, the frame and wheels are going for and you'll have a better idea imo, always after making sure the frame is sound.
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Old 08-16-2015, 09:58 AM
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I was offered this bike for $1200 and there's room. The thing weighs nothing.

Keep in mind, I'm 5'11, 210 and plan to ride it on the bike path. I have a Trek hybrid now.

Thoughts?
Litespeed has a good reputation for building very nice recreational bikes as well as top end racing models. The one you have here appears to be a high end metal (possibly titanium) + (Easton) CF forks racing bike, a few years old judging by the older high end components on it. They are still good high end components albeit of an earlier design. Very nice light wheels. The gearing is for racing, on flatter courses so change the cassette if you intend to climb hills on your rides. Tires may be old and require replacement.

I'd say if the bike fits you and you're in the market for a really nice older bike for a bargain... just compare other similar offers and make sure there's no damage from spills or crashes. All the better if you can do a test ride.
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Old 08-16-2015, 10:34 AM
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That's why a more forward saddle position is preferred in triathlons and duathlons. To work a more similar combination of muscles to running, and to make transitions smoother. Only problem is that this position produces less power and is then better with lower gears.
The forward position is also more aerodynamic but a strong cyclist's bigger thigh and calf muscles won't benefit running. The position also changes the balance of weight placed on the bike, putting more weight on your hands and shoulders and less on your manhood... erm, butt.

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Btw I decided not to give a damn about UCI legal position mainly because in UK TTs often don't care about it and second but no less important, because my manhood suffers too much with a max 3 degrees forward saddle tilt
I had to look up the relevant UCI regulations about your saddle. Well, even if the officials complain at the event, you can always adjust the saddle to keep them happy and you'll be OK.

Your manhood was probably "the clincher". What saddle are you on by the way? I haven't ride my TT bike enough to be sure but I've got an ISM Adamo Podium on mine and it's quite comfy so far.
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Old 08-16-2015, 12:24 PM
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I have a regular racing saddle, pretty light but nothing special. Don't really want an Adamo for now, mainly for the looks and also cause it's really good only for TTs. The Adamo has also been designed to allow a forward position within the UCI limits of the tip of the saddle not having to go over the vertical line passing through the centre of the BB. I'd rather have a regular saddle and slam it all the way forward without taking care of the rules. I am thinking of changing mine, though, probably for a Fizik one. Just back from a ride and my bum is in agony.
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Old 08-16-2015, 01:57 PM
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Judging from the size of the head tube that is a very small frame & might be too short for you at 5'11".

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Originally Posted by darth550 View Post
I was offered this bike for $1200 and there's room. The thing weighs nothing.

Keep in mind, I'm 5'11, 210 and plan to ride it on the bike path. I have a Trek hybrid now.

Thoughts?
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Old 08-16-2015, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Igor Ound View Post
I have a regular racing saddle, pretty light but nothing special. Don't really want an Adamo for now, mainly for the looks and also cause it's really good only for TTs. The Adamo has also been designed to allow a forward position within the UCI limits of the tip of the saddle not having to go over the vertical line passing through the centre of the BB. I'd rather have a regular saddle and slam it all the way forward without taking care of the rules. I am thinking of changing mine, though, probably for a Fizik one. Just back from a ride and my bum is in agony.
Sorry about your agony. Your bum should recover to "fight" another day.

The shorter split nose of the Podium removes the pressure point on my... whatever. If you use a regular road saddle and move it forward while bending your upper body over even more than on your road bike, your "thing" ends up compressed against the tip of the saddle. The old guys keep telling me some of the pros have ended up with permanent "bodily issues".

The Podium is designed for longer TT rides for riders with flexible bodies, a characteristic which also tends to fit the Fizik designs. However, I have a wider set of "sit bones" and need a 155 mm width seat. Fizik doesn't make those at all while ISM and Specialized do. IMO, ISM and Specialized make the most sensible saddles on the market. My road saddles are the Romin Pro and Romin EVO Pro.
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Old 08-16-2015, 09:12 PM
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Judging from the size of the head tube that is a very small frame & might be too short for you at 5'11".
+1 Make sure the thing fits!
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Old 08-17-2015, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by darth550 View Post
I was offered this bike for $1200 and there's room. The thing weighs nothing.

Keep in mind, I'm 5'11, 210 and plan to ride it on the bike path. I have a Trek hybrid now.

Thoughts?
One of the guys on our weekly rides has one of these.
Very cool bike, to say the least.

I agree about the fit.
If it doesn't fit, don't waste your time or money.
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Old 08-17-2015, 11:27 AM
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I'm going to go back and check it out tomorrow. Don't have shoes to ride it though.
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Old 08-17-2015, 04:59 PM
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I'm going to go back and check it out tomorrow. Don't have shoes to ride it though.
You don't need proper shoes to understand if that's your right size.

Btw if you intend on using the bike with aerobars a smaller size frame is often faster and more comfortable. Mine is 3 sizes smaller than the recommended one for my height.
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:59 PM
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You don't need proper shoes to understand if that's your right size.

Btw if you intend on using the bike with aerobars a smaller size frame is often faster and more comfortable. Mine is 3 sizes smaller than the recommended one for my height.
I get that. I was just rushed when I saw it and won't be tomorrow. I'll have more time to see.
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Old 08-17-2015, 08:05 PM
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BYW, this is on there too.
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