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Old 05-28-2008, 06:33 PM
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Gas resistant silicone gasket sealant?

Can anyone recommend the best gas resistant silicone gasket sealant? I need something to help seal old float bowls and to form a gasket between the carb and intake manifold an old Briggs.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-28-2008, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Korr View Post
Can anyone recommend the best gas resistant silicone gasket sealant? I need something to help seal old float bowls and to form a gasket between the carb and intake manifold an old Briggs.

Thanks in advance.
A fairly thick paper gasket fitted DRY, no sealant whatsoever.
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Old 05-28-2008, 07:43 PM
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A fairly thick paper gasket fitted DRY, no sealant whatsoever.
Looks like that's a good idea for the carb and manifold. I still need something for the float bowls, though.
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Old 05-29-2008, 12:17 AM
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I went to Pep Boys last month, and they had just about every type of silicone you can imagine. Many, perhaps all are not compatible with gasoline, but you could check. Using silicone in a carb may not be a good idea... if any small bits break loose, it would not take much to plug or gum up something small and important. If your problem can't be handled with a normal gasket or kit, I guess it wouldn't hurt to try silicone, and then find a new carb or parts if that doesn't work. Good luck
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Old 05-29-2008, 12:41 AM
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Originally Posted by FandLcars View Post
I went to Pep Boys last month, and they had just about every type of silicone you can imagine. Many, perhaps all are not compatible with gasoline, but you could check. Using silicone in a carb may not be a good idea... if any small bits break loose, it would not take much to plug or gum up something small and important. If your problem can't be handled with a normal gasket or kit, I guess it wouldn't hurt to try silicone, and then find a new carb or parts if that doesn't work. Good luck
You guys are right. I'm going to skip the silicone on the float bowls...it'll just come back to haunt me. I'd order a kit, but none are available. I did find gaskets that are the correct length, but they aren't formed to the complex shapes of each bowl, and they are impossible *****ers to get seated long enough to get the bowls on. My thought was to use the silicone to hold them in place in certain areas long enough to affix the bowls, but the first set expanded shortly after coming in contact with the Permatex that I was using.

:float bowls are on an old twin cyl motorcycle, not on an old Briggs.

Last edited by Korr; 05-29-2008 at 12:43 AM.
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Old 05-29-2008, 06:42 AM
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Silicone will break down and bugger up the carb. If you just want to keep the gasket in place for assembly you might try thick grease. The grease is very sticky, compatible with the gacket material and will just wash away once you add fuel.
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Old 05-29-2008, 08:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Korr View Post
You guys are right. I'm going to skip the silicone on the float bowls...it'll just come back to haunt me. I'd order a kit, but none are available. I did find gaskets that are the correct length, but they aren't formed to the complex shapes of each bowl, and they are impossible *****ers to get seated long enough to get the bowls on. My thought was to use the silicone to hold them in place in certain areas long enough to affix the bowls, but the first set expanded shortly after coming in contact with the Permatex that I was using.

:float bowls are on an old twin cyl motorcycle, not on an old Briggs.
What kind of motorcycle?
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Old 05-29-2008, 08:43 AM
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I used Hylomar to hold the rubber o-rings (that are used for float bowl gaskets on my bike) in place until I could get the bowls in place and the screws snugged up.
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Old 05-29-2008, 06:41 PM
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There's really no such thing as "petroleum proof" silicone --- some blends are more resistant than others, but none of them will tolerate long term exposure to gasoline.

Hylomar is the only way to fly when you want to seal against fuels and oils (i.e., petroleum products).
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Old 05-30-2008, 07:48 AM
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Hylomar ROCKS!
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Old 05-30-2008, 09:00 AM
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3bond1211 i think this is the name, completely gas resistant.
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Old 03-16-2010, 11:30 AM
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BOWL GASKET

ultra black silicon will work as a gasket and is impervious to petrolium products
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Old 03-16-2010, 03:43 PM
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Permatex Anaerobic flange sealant, no gasket needed and once cured it is impervious to attack by any conventional solvent, fuel or oil.

pricey though. roughly $15 or so per tube of 50mL.

Same as Loctite 515, same Co. at one time.

The 1211 by three bond is good but I wouldn't use it on a float bowl where it's in constant contact with fuel and vapors.
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Old 03-16-2010, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snactolate View Post
ultra black silicon will work as a gasket and is impervious to petrolium products
Wow, your first Post,, #1 is so wordy......
and, wrong. (sorry)

Once you invent a Gasoline resistant Silicon, call me & we will patent it.
(Not kidding.)

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Old 03-16-2010, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 350HPMondial View Post
Wow, your first Post,, #1 is so wordy......
and, wrong. (sorry)

Once you invent a Gasoline resistant Silicon, call me & we will patent it.
(Not kidding.)

Edwardo
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EPA/Dept. of Public Health Certified.
Actually, Dow Corning makes a #730 RTV sealant that is "resistant to many fuels, oils & solvents" but it's expensive. I've used it on intake manifold gaskets and used it to seal the intercooler housing on my 308 as insurance, even though it's also sealed with O-ring string. I had it all apart recently and it seemed to be holding up. The way I use 730, it's not immersed in gasoline. It's only exposed to reversion spray and fumes. The instructions do say it can be used for "assembly and repair of fuel lines and tanks on small engines" so who knows?

In a pinch, when a carburetor insists on leaking, I usually use Hylomar since you can still easily disassemble the components. Great stuff but the fact that it doesn't harden makes it useless in some applications.

Wurth Orange Flange Sealant is anaerobic and also seams to be fuel proof. It only hardens in the joint but then it turns to concrete so it's not recommended for carburetors. Same thing - for certain applications it can't be beat.
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:23 PM
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No such thing ---- All silicones are incompatible with gasoline, some mixtures and formulations will last longer than others, but in the end, they will all dissolve or get broken down ----- PERIOD.
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by finnerty View Post
No such thing ---- All silicones are incompatible with gasoline, some mixtures and formulations will last longer than others, but in the end, they will all dissolve or get broken down ----- PERIOD.
You can say "period" all you want but until you've tried it you don't really know do you?
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Old 03-18-2010, 04:02 PM
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I'll rely on the 30 years of data collected by the M&P Engineers in my industry regarding the performance and usage specs of silicone sealants (including RTV's) ---- they do really know. If the experts in the aircraft and aerospace industries all say these sealants are not compatible with hydrocarbons, I'll take their word for it ---- and, I'll borrow their "period" on the issue.

Last edited by finnerty; 03-18-2010 at 04:05 PM.
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Old 03-18-2010, 06:48 PM
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I'll rely on the 30 years of data collected by the M&P Engineers in my industry regarding the performance and usage specs of silicone sealants (including RTV's) ---- they do really know. If the experts in the aircraft and aerospace industries all say these sealants are not compatible with hydrocarbons, I'll take their word for it ---- and, I'll borrow their "period" on the issue.
Are you still using a dial telephone? I do admit they were more reliable.
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Old 03-18-2010, 07:01 PM
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Permatex #1 & #2 form-a-gasket, and flexible thread sealant are all gasoline resitant. They do not have high adhesion though, they are just sealants that need varying amounts of time to cure. #1 is quick and dries relatively hard, #2 is slower and dries very flexible, threaded sealant never dries.

BT
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