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2018/2019 Silly season

Discussion in 'F1' started by Igor Ound, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
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    just to reiterate.....team entries for 2019

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. DF1

    DF1 F1 World Champ
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    BaWü
  3. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
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  4. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
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    The F1 minimum weight limit goes up by 3kgs to 743kgs next year. With the fuel limit also rising by 5kgs if a driver starts with a full tank that will be 853kgs plus a little extra fuel for parc ferme.
     
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  5. william

    william F1 World Champ

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    So, it"s Ferrari Minnow from now on ....

    Not a clever choice to lift their image, I would have thought .
     
  6. DF1

    DF1 F1 World Champ
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    https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/140541/f1-grid-penalty-process-tweaked-for-2019

    The FIA has tweaked the way penalties will be applied to Formula 1 grids from 2019, in an attempt to encourage those who have penalties to take part in qualifying.

    For 2018, The FIA introduced a rule that put anyone with more than 15 places of power unit grid penalties to the back of the grid.

    When more than one driver was affected, the order was determined by the order in which the offence was committed - in other words when the new elements were first used on track.

    That led to the sometimes farcical situation of drivers leaving their garages before the start of first practice and parking at the end of the pitlane with their engine switched off to secure a spot bagging on the grid ahead of anyone joining the queue behind them.

    To prevent this from happening in 2019, penalised drivers will instead line up on the grid in the order in which they qualified - which will also provide an incentive for them to set competitive times in qualifying instead of making a token appearance in Q1 before saving tyres.

    The FIA has also clarified that any driver who is outside the 107% rule and is allowed to start will be placed at the back regardless, behind any drivers with power unit penalties.

    Another adjustment to the sporting regulations confirmed at Wednesday's World Motor Sport Council meeting is to allow unrestricted CFD simulations to be carried out for the development of cars in accordance with the 2021 regulations.

    This practice was carried out previously when teams were working to future regulations, and reflects the fact that they will be providing feedback that will help F1 and the FIA shape the 2021 rules.

    [​IMG]

    Other changes include a requirement for teams to ensure fuel-handling procedures are the same for testing as they are at race events.

    Since a fire broke out in the Williams garage at the Spanish Grand Prix in 2012, rules have specified precautions such as the use of protective equipment and dry-break couplings, and FIA observers had noticed those procedures have not always been employed in testing.

    New rules also state that cars will be kept under yellow flag conditions until they reach the control line after the safety car returns to the pits.

    While no overtaking was allowed in such circumstances, green flags had been displayed around the track when the safety car entered the pits, creating a "mixed message" that the FIA has now addressed.

    From now on safety car boards will be withdrawn but yellow flags will continue to be shown, and the leaders will see the green lights and green flags only at the line.

    Minor adjustments to F1's technical regulations include a final sign off on bodywork details relating to 2019 front wing changes, while an extra three kilograms has been added to the minimum weight - which increases from 740kg to 743kg.

    Although such weight hikes are usually related to specific rule changes, such as the addition of the halo or the move to wider wheels and tyres, in this case teams lobbied the FIA to complain they were struggling to reach the 740kg minimum weight.
     
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  7. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
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    It's Marlboro's e-cigarrette "minnowing" process. Go figure. I don't like either. Loved the Scuderia crest. No more prominant Shell logo either (uniforms).
     
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  8. Nortonious

    Nortonious Karting

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  9. DF1

    DF1 F1 World Champ
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    F1 teams' real 2018 performance levels revealed - https://www.autosport.com/f1/feature/8674/f1-teams-real-2018-performance-levels-revealed --


    Here is the top 3 from the link-

    1 Mercedes

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    Average performance pace: 100.119%

    Mercedes decided to stick with what it knew this season with a car that built on its 2017 machine, which proved to be the right choice.

    But it still wasn't easy, and Mercedes' great strength was how it learned from its struggles in the first half of the season to leave Ferrari behind in the crucial second half of 2018. The depth of understanding was what made the difference.

    Just as it found last season, tyres were a challenge early on. It's all about the compromise between getting them working for a single qualifying lap and over a race stint.

    There are pressure minimums so you have to get the tyres warm before you go out and the driver can then go slowly to let the rear temperatures come down.

    But you can't fit slow laps into a 20-lap race stint and Mercedes had some difficulties achieving this compromise at times. But despite that seemingly being harder for it than Ferrari, Mercedes got on top of it and won the championship.

    There was lots of talk about the team's wheelrims, which appeared at Spa. These were an attempt to avoid too much temperature build-up in parts of the wheel, which would transfer to the tyre. Mercedes did stop running the design for a while, even though the race stewards ruled it legal.

    It's clearly not a moveable aerodynamic device because a wheel has to move, and it was an innovative way to control the build-up of temperature. I'm all for this kind of innovation, it was great stuff.

    On the power unit side, Mercedes made good steps with the upgrades it introduced at the French and Belgian Grands Prix, but this season proved that the advantage it had in the early years of these engine rules has been eroded by Ferrari.


    2 Ferrari

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    Average performance pace: 100.237%

    Everyone at Ferrari has good reason to be kicking themselves, because the car was good enough to have at least given Mercedes a tougher run for its money - and with that extra pressure on Mercedes, Ferrari might just have beaten it to the championship.

    Things always do go wrong during a season, but Ferrari didn't respond well to them and the same mistakes were repeated. That's not just for Vettel, who threw away too many points, but also for the team.

    Ferrari made bigger changes to its car concept this year, switching to a higher-rake design and lengthening the wheelbase. The longer wheelbase meant it lost a little of the advantage it had at slower tracks last year, and there were times when the high rake seemed to cause confusion.

    Having lost its advantage at the slower tracks, the high rake was supposed to make up for this. The aim is to get the front wing lower, particularly for the low- and medium-speed corners, to counteract the tendency to understeer.

    Then, at higher speed, you want the downforce centre of pressure to move backwards giving more rear stability. While Mercedes stuck with what it knew, Ferrari changed and it took a while to get on top of it.

    Many times early in the season we saw a struggle to get the car working at its best on Friday, although big steps were often taken for Saturday. But later in the season, Ferrari lost its way with the floor changes it experimented with in the run of races starting with Sochi.

    This is where understanding the concept is so important, as with a high-rake car changes to the floor can have a big impact on the way you are sealing the underfloor. This is crucial to the diffuser performance and in turn overall car performance. The fact that Ferrari had to roll back these changes says it all.

    There were inevitable rumours about what Ferrari might be doing with its power units, as the performance was strong on the straights in qualifying in particular. But I don't believe Ferrari was doing anything illegal - and neither did the FIA.


    3 Red Bull

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    Average performance pace: 100.797%

    Red Bull's RB14 was definitely a good car, but whether it was the best if you allowed for the power deficit of the Renault engine is very difficult to be sure of.

    As McLaren has realised this year, it's not simply a case of putting a more powerful engine into a car. There are always compromises when fitting a different engine.

    When Red Bull was dominating F1 with Renault, it didn't have the power of the Mercedes or Ferrari but the Renault required less cooling and the car was optimised for downforce, never really performing that strongly on the straights.

    The same seems to be the case now. So much cooling is required with these engines that even another 30bhp could mean some of the airflow you use for downforce has to go to cooling, which means the compromise changes.

    So putting a Mercedes or Ferrari engine into a Red Bull isn't necessarily that simple. The Red Bull was a well-balanced car and, as a result, very good on its tyres. This shows a good understanding of how to control the aerodynamic characteristics to be strong in low, medium and high-speed corners.

    The car also rides the kerbs very well, and that combined with good corner speed also means it was slightly less aggressive on the tyres when putting the power down out of corners.

    We did see a lot of reliability problems and Red Bull was very good at throwing Renault under the bus when this happened. But Red Bull had its own problems in this area too.

    Overall, we saw how good the Red Bull was when it dominated in Monaco and Mexico. The key question now is how the Honda relationship works, because that's a company that won't accept the same treatment Renault has had.
     
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  10. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
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    Here's an image comparison of the 2007 cars (V8's) and 2019 cars.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. william

    william F1 World Champ

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    This is why it's impossible to compare drivers from different eras, IMO.
    As these photos show, they drive completely different cars !
     
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  12. blkfxstc

    blkfxstc Rookie
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    No wonder they keep crashing into each other, the cars are huge now..... :D
     
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  13. daytona355

    daytona355 F1 Veteran

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    Sid Korshak
    They should cut them down by half a metre all ways around, strap good old V10s or V8s in them, strip out the Kers crap, and go racing
     
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