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348 front brake pads R&R?

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by NC348, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. NC348

    NC348 Karting

    Feb 18, 2003
    154
    Houston, TX
    Full Name:
    James I. Movich
    Hey guys, i ordered the greenstuff pads after reading all the various opinions and they are on the way. i plan on doing the changeout myself, as i know the disks are ok and within tolerance.

    is everything as straightforward as i think and it appears, or is there anything (hidden, tricky, etc.) i need to be aware of?

    i want to avoid coming here after the fact, if ya know what i mean.... far to often, i have seen phrases like "what they dont tell you is...." so i am asking before i start.

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    6,333
    When you push the caliper pistons in to release the old pads and make room for the new pads, the level in the master resoiroir will increase. Use a turkey baster to lower the level first to avoid a nasty spill of brake fluid.

    After you are done, change the brake fluid--e.g. a whole pint of fluid, and bleed until you can see new fluid.

    Then go out and take her for a drive. Be careful because the brakes have not been bedded in. Brake progressively harder and harder until either A) brake pads fully seat on the rotors, or B) you can tell something is amiss. In case B) return and analyse then fix and retry.

    After this bedding in process, drive 50 miles on you favorite back road using copious amounts of brakes. Then come back and flush the fluid again. At this point the fluid is completely fresh and will last 2 years (non track use) before anything needs done here again.
     
  3. NC348

    NC348 Karting

    Feb 18, 2003
    154
    Houston, TX
    Full Name:
    James I. Movich
    thanks, i would never have thought to bleed twice. but the rest of te procedure should not be too difficult, i guess. do you think it makes any differance to do fronts only this month, and rears next, or should i do all four regardles or rear condition.
     
  4. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    6,333
    If you are going to do both ends do them together as this optimizes the bleeding procedure and gets the fluid to its freshest point. If you are only going to do one end and then wait until the other end needs done, then just follow 1/2 the procedure.

    Since I track my car a lot, I have fallen into a pattern: the front brakes last 5 track day, while the rears last 7 track days. I change them both at the same time since the rears have less then 25% life remaining when I change the fronts, its quick insurance, and prevents me from having a bad day at the track when the rear pads fail at 9:00 AM--ask me how I know.
     
  5. NC348

    NC348 Karting

    Feb 18, 2003
    154
    Houston, TX
    Full Name:
    James I. Movich
    my guess is that you had a nice adenaline wake up ending up in a result that cost a lot more than pads! LOL

    you answer has helped me decide to wait to do the rears. my mechanic said they all looked pretty good, but the fronts were starting to get to the 'going to need to do soon' category. so i decided to do now instead of wait. my plan is do fronts, wait a month or two and then do rears.
     
  6. Schatten

    Schatten F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Apr 3, 2001
    11,234
    Austin, TX
    Full Name:
    Randy
    actually, if you are changing the compound of the pads, or a brand/type of pad, you should change all four corners to keep the balance and also not to disrupt any ABS (if you have it in any car).

    the only time you want to swap out just the fronts or just the rears with a different compound/brand/type of pad is when you are shooting for different balances in your braking system, which a proportioning valve might not work in your system, or temperatures are being examined and need to be relieved.

    my advice: change all four at once unless you already have greenstuff on the rears.

    not sure if you'll dig the greenstuff pads, but they should work fine, not too dusty, and not too squeaky (if at all) on the street. for the next set, on down the line, you can look into some ferodo or cobalts which can be a bit stickier, not too dusty nor squeaky as well.

    and don't forget to bleed those brake lines!
     
  7. NC348

    NC348 Karting

    Feb 18, 2003
    154
    Houston, TX
    Full Name:
    James I. Movich
    Wow, i hadnt thought of that! thanks. THAT changes my decision.
    great advice. i am changing materials, so i will now do all four at once.
     
  8. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    6,333
    No that happened with the Ferrari pads a year earlier and I was lucky only to scratch up the belly pan. When I went through the rear pads, the whole car would shudder when brakes were applied--metal on metal braking (hic).
     

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