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360 battery lifetime

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by Hubert888, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Hubert888

    Hubert888 F1 Veteran
    BANNED

    May 14, 2003
    5,376
    Manhattan & LA
    Full Name:
    Hubert
    Hey. I just got a new battery installed at the Ferrari of Long Island dealership last Tuesday. They also did other tests to make sure nothing else was wrong with the battery and its systems. I drove it for about an hour that day. Then I parked it in my car garage in Manhattan.

    Today (6 days later), I tried starting the car and the battery is completely dead! F@ck! And the battery tender doesnt seem to charge the battery too.

    Do you think that my new battery being dead is a result of just the severe cold weather in NYC or maybe something else?

    And I know that battery tenders arent supposed to be used for charging completely dead batteries, but shouldn't they at least charge it a little bit when plugged in?
     
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  3. 355f

    355f Formula Junior

    Nov 1, 2003
    305
    The battery tender will not charge your battery in those circumstances.

    there are 2 possibilities.

    1st is that the battery was not fully charged when they put it in and after 6 days of current drain its dead. In which case it may recharge but sometimes the lates are damaged by heavy discharge

    2nd is that new battery was faulty.
     
  4. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    7,672
    A battery fresh from the manufacture is only at the 80% charge level. That is, take a brand new battery, and add the acid that makes it work. Presto, you have a battery at 80% charge (from Yausa site). If you then drive the car home and leave it; presto, the battery will NEVER be able to hold more then 80% charge. (Yausa site). The only way to get a battery up to full and complete charge is either a) take it on a drive lasting more than 1 hour, or b) put it on a charger and charge it all the way up.

    Depending upon what kind of battery you bought, the voltage out of the voltage regulator may not be enough to fully charge the battery! An old-style lead acid battery needs as little as 13.5 V to fully charge, while a maintance free (Calcium in the lead plates) will need 14.3V to fully charge. In any event, a fully charged battery after resting for 1 hour will hold 12.66 Volts, any battery holding less than 12.0 Volts after an hour of rest is not in a good state of charge. (Optima site)

    A high capacity battery (like the kind we put in automobiles for starting engines) do not like to be stored without full charge (sulfation). A single deep discharge can reduce the battery capacity by over 15%. After a few deep discharges, the battery is toast.
     
  5. Hubert888

    Hubert888 F1 Veteran
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    May 14, 2003
    5,376
    Manhattan & LA
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    Hubert
    so...do you think i should have the car brought back to the dealership? or should i just jump it and drive it for an hour...and then put the battery tender back on it?

    it's a 1 week old battery so i would think that they would give me a new replacement for free?
     
  6. 355f

    355f Formula Junior

    Nov 1, 2003
    305
    I would take it back.

    I know its a hassle but in my case I had a heavy discharge on a new battery and it never recovered really.

    So best let them have it, they will try to fully charge it and then see if it works properly after that.

    Otherwise you will waste more time wondering if its ok. Even if you jump i and drive for an hour or so under your presnt circumstnaces its not going to fully charge anyway. You need a proper 36 hour slow charge
     
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  8. Hubert888

    Hubert888 F1 Veteran
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    May 14, 2003
    5,376
    Manhattan & LA
    Full Name:
    Hubert
    ok thank you for the advice :)
     

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