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365 GTC vs. 330 GTC

Discussion in 'Vintage (thru 365 GTC4)' started by P_RSR, Jun 25, 2014.

  1. intrepidcva11

    intrepidcva11 Formula 3
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    Seth
    Unless you drive your car hard and for lots of miles each year, I doubt you'd notice any difference. My guess is that longevity is the real benefit from fitting Lobro half-shafts. Taz will have a more reliable opinion.
     
  2. DWR46

    DWR46 Formula 3
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    Jun 19, 2012
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    I believe the factory was trying to make the car run smoother. CV joints eliminate the cyclic nature of the Cardan joints and result in the halfshafts turning at a more consistent rotational speed during each revolution. As for hard usage, GTB/C's used the standard Cardan U-joints and they were never a failure point. If your car has standard U-joints, there is no reason to ever change to CV joints. In addition, the U-joints are a standard Chevy propshaft unit and very inexpensive compared to the CV joints.
     
  3. Bob Zambelli

    Bob Zambelli Formula 3
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    I guess I should jump in at this point.
    I have owned my GTC since November of 1975 (second owner). Having put well over 130,000 miles on it, I’m pretty familiar with the car. One of the things in the post that caught my eye was the discussion about the handbrake. Mine is, of course, the “umbrella handle” style. Shortly after I purchased the car, (around 41,000 miles) I put new pads in the handbrake caliper – not that the old ones were worn out but I had some new ones in stock so I decide to use them. After installation, I adjusted the cable and have not touched it since. I use the handbrake every time I park the car and yes, it holds, even on hills. I NEVER leave the car in gear when it’s parked (someone going to ask me why?). For what it’s worth, I do not care for the lever type handbrake as used on the 365 GTC and Daytona. The console area is a nice little “catch-all” for things like coffee cups, sandwiches and snacks.

    Comparing the 330 and 365 GTC, I have driven a number of each and I found a noticeable difference, especially in the engine’s responsiveness and power. Also, the 365 seems to shift smoother. Handling appears about the same. I do not care for the top-mounted engine compartment vent. I think the “gill” type vents are much more attractive.

    The GTC is my everyday driver. Except for the carpets, door sill plates and dashboard top cover, the interior is entirely original.

    I have never done anything to the brake system except replace the pads, hoses and brake booster. The calipers are original and the discs have never been turned. Two weeks ago, the original clutch slave cylinder began leaking. I honed the cylinder and replaced the seal. It should be good for another 170,000 miles. Except for the rear springs, lower ball joints and outer tie-rod ends, the suspension is all original. Yes, there is some play in the A-arm bushings but that has minimal effect on the driving – mostly just a bit noisy. The steering box has a bit of play but also of minimal concern. The clutch was replaced at 40,000 miles and I replaced it again at 170,000. I rebuilt the engine at the same intervals.

    I rebuilt the transmission at 70,000 miles. The transaxle center section (limited slip) was replaced at 160,000. The four universals have never been changed.

    All the wheel ball bearings have been changed. The outer front wheel bearings are original.

    That’s about it for major repairs. There were, and always will be little things to attend to but by and large, it’s a very good car for everyday driving. Good luggage room allows my fiancé to pack the way she wants to. When I go to model airplane contests, there is sufficient room for tools and two or three airplanes.

    Gas mileage? Terrible! But, that’s not why I bought the car.

    My only issue right now is the air conditioning. I plan to upgrade it to a rotary compressor, new condenser and receiver/dryer as well as 134A refrigerant.

    Also, I just purchased a Blaupunkt Toronto stereo system that I will install soon.

    See my point here? I drive my car. Yes, I know it’s valuable but hey, it’s still just a car. I start it up, let it fast idle in neutral with the clutch out for a minute or so and then take off. My main paranoia is leaving the car out in public overnight. I don’t park it overnight in motel parking lots. Many hotels offer secure parking and I try for them.

    I guess what puzzles me is all the things I read about low-mileage Ferraris. I’ve heard of GTCs and other vintage cars with less than 20,000 miles. That equates to around 425 miles per year! I put more than that on in a month. How can someone own such a magnificent road car and just let it sit?

    A question for the philosophers, I guess.

    Bob Z.
     
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  4. JazzyO

    JazzyO F1 World Champ

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    #29 JazzyO, Jul 20, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Always inspiring to read your accounts, Bob. For me, the true pleasure of owning the GTC was driving it, especially when pushing it on a mountain pass. Chasing my modern Ferrari friends (and keeping up, to their surprise) in Switzerland was special, these cars can do much more than 95% of their owners are ever aware of. But I did have to change my driving style - I ran out of brakes the first pass I went down. When I realised the brakes were fading I thought "Moss, Frère, Gendebien, these guys were driving much quicker than I am. I must be doing something wrong!". As soon as I adapted (trust the chassis for higher corner speeds than you thought, pick your gear for the corner ahead of the corner, just short, sharp, dab on brakes and power on before the apex to pull the nose in and wriggle out at speed), I never had a problem again and both car and owner were so much happier.


    Onno
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  5. intrepidcva11

    intrepidcva11 Formula 3
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    Wonderful, Bob; now I'm really p-ssed that I didn't drive mine far more often
     
  6. 6carb

    6carb Rookie

    Jan 30, 2013
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    anyone know how much that blue sera car is? Also a slightly ropey looking (but aparantly original one coming up the lot before the 250 GTO at Quail...
     
  7. Oengus

    Oengus F1 Veteran
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    I had an opportunity to buy a 330GTC about 4 years ago
    Worst mistake of my life was not pulling the trigger...
     
  8. VIZSLA

    VIZSLA Four Time F1 World Champ
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    Jan 11, 2008
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    Well at least you got the chance to meet me.
    ;)

    I assume you mean the one at FONE.
     
  9. John B

    John B Formula 3
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    #34 John B, Aug 7, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
    OK Bob, I'll take the bait. Why never leave the car in gear when you park it?

    - The "slow roll" on compression?

    - The potentially dangerous lurch if you forget and start it in gear?

    - Am I missing something else?

    My GTC handbrake (Umbrella type) sort of works, but is inadequate on a steep incline. If you are not careful and apply it really hard the car still rolls a little. I leave it in gear as an extra precaution. I also stick a chalk behind a wheel when it's parked in my garage as there is a designed in three degree pitch out for drainage.
     
  10. Bob Zambelli

    Bob Zambelli Formula 3
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    Here's my rationale.
    As you all know, I drive my car quite a bit.
    Although I'm extremely cautious about parking it, there is always the chance that someone could bump it from the front or rear. If the car is left in gear, a hit could cause a temendous shock through the drivetrain - through the differential, the gearbox and finally to the engine.
    Could it cause damage?
    I'm not sure but why take the risk?
    Anyhow, I use the hankbrake EVERY time I park the car. I have never been in a situation where it did not hold. And yes, I've parked it on some hills.
    If a situation occurs where you are unsure if it will hold and you're fairly sure that nobody will hit it, leave it in the gear of the direction it could roll - first if it could roll forward, reverse if it could roll backward. That way, the engine would turn in the proper direction if the car rolls.
    Make sense?

    Bob Z.
     
  11. John B

    John B Formula 3
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    Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation.
     
  12. migg48

    migg48 Karting

    Jul 7, 2006
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    I've never owned a 365 GTC, but I did have a couple 365 GTB Daytonas. I also had a 330 GTS. If I could have any of them back right now it would be the 330 GTS, hands down. I just loved that car.
     
  13. cheesey

    cheesey Formula 3

    Jun 23, 2011
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    the brake shoe surface on the hand brakes can harden / glaze for any number of reasons leaving the surface with limited grip... try the easy fix by scuffing them with coarse emory cloth... ( crud can build up and seal the surface ) if that doesn't satisfy, rebuild the shoes at a specialist with a softer compound that gives better grip
     
  14. Oengus

    Oengus F1 Veteran
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    YUP THATS THE ONE, and yes it was a pleasure meeting you in Boston.
     
  15. 335s

    335s Formula Junior

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    In my own experience:
    There are a couple of other significant differences: the uprights in the front are different(BIGGER wheel bearings-a 330 upright will NOT fit a 4.4 car), the brake system is completely different, as in better...

    The clutch-as previously mentioned-is factually different as the transaxle is a "Daytona" type including matricola 603 final drive(this is kinda significant), this is tied to the LOBRO CV joints("930 type")....any posters ever clutch a 4.4 version????
    The water pump assembly is different-don't be fooled by being told they are the same-they are NOT-parts require some machining to make the impellor and pump shaft replacement work properly(seal)

    With alloy wheels, these cars are SIGNIFICANTLY faster at old Laguna Seca-by many, MANY, seconds per lap, than a "Daytona" even with a "big" motor and with a 9 x 35 short ratio...

    The 330 is generally accepted as a prettier car-no argument from this corner-HOWEVER, the 4.4 cars are just bigger and more modernly built. thus much faster cars, and significantly more "nimble" than are Daytonas(and I've owned a dozed of these in both bodies)
     
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  16. sixcarbs

    sixcarbs F1 Veteran
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    I am guessing the answer is yes but just want to confirm. Did the 365 GTS get all of the same upgrades mentioned here?
     
  17. 335s

    335s Formula Junior

    Jan 17, 2007
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    T. Monma
    AFIK-yes...
    I've seen only 2 of the 19 cars(one is gone), a number of years ago(decades in truth...), however, the majority of items mentioned were visible, and , the RARE factory parts and maintenance/shop manuals/books illustrated that both open and closed cars were/are built the same- excepting for the obvious coachwork variations...
     
  18. 335s

    335s Formula Junior

    Jan 17, 2007
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    T. Monma
    IF you are a real "friver", take the 4.4...
    If "looks" are more important than the shoe, take the 4.0, admittedly, they are a slightly prettier car, but grunt wise, as I said: no contest...
     

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