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6 cylinder Maseratis

Discussion in 'Maserati' started by johnireland, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. johnireland

    johnireland Formula 3
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    Mar 19, 2017
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    These are 3 of my favorites...
    I know the Biturbo is the bastard child of Maserati, but I like them because they are small and part of the 6 cylinder tradition that made Maserati different from both Ferrari and Alfa Romeo. Though the Biturbo has tons of flaws...it was a bold dream by a guy who tried to save the company. And it may be the last engine series actually made by Maserati, as opposed to the rebadged Ferrari engines they use today. Sorry for the double posting of the pictures it was inadvertent and I didn't figure out how to undo it.
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  2. redfred84

    redfred84 Formula Junior
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    Interesting point of view.
     
  3. Merak1974

    Merak1974 Formula 3

    Aug 31, 2009
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    6 cylinder engines are surely an important part of Maserati's past, present and future, and the Biturbo may have been key to the marque's survival during the troubled 1980s and early 1990s.

    However, 6 cylinder engines do not, in my opinion, define or characterize Maserati as a car company. It has over its history produced 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16 cylinder engines of various configurations; most of them highly successful in racing or for road use.
     
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  4. Froggie

    Froggie Karting

    Sep 27, 2017
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    Belgium
    If I may dare, L6's and V8's are maybe the most famous...
     
  5. johnireland

    johnireland Formula 3
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    Mar 19, 2017
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    I agree, the 6s were really just in the 1950s and maybe early 1960s. But the cars, in my opinion, seemed lighter and more agile than the later V8s. Of course I'm talking street machines. Their sports racers are a whole other breed. I think it was back in 1958 I saw Shelby race in a birdcage at Riverside International Raceway. The biggest flaw in the Maserati story, again in my opinion, is that they always appeared under financed. What FIAT brought to Ferrari, was never matched by the Orsi family or Citroen. The Alejandro de Tomaso period was probably the first time since the Maserati Brothers lost the company, that it was once again owned by a true auto enthusiast (and former race car driver). And they were much more successful in Europe than in America (for several reasons).

    I had a 1985 E coupe (Western US version with liquid intercoolers) and I enjoyed the car totally...was my daily driver, had a couple of electrical relays fail, but nothing bad. However I was also building a vintage race car at the time and that stole money from some things I would have liked to do with the Biturbo. I even thought of using the Biturbo to flat tow my race car (a 1958 Alfa Spider) to the tracks but had no luck fabricating a tow set up for it. I finally sold the Biturbo and got a three liter Alfa Milano which had a factory tow hitch available and that became my tow vehicle as well as daily driver.

    But I still miss the Biturbo to this day. So much that I'm looking to buy one (the right one) within a year. Probably out of Europe and will try to fake it past California inspection.
     
  6. flat_plane_eddie

    flat_plane_eddie Formula 3
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    There's an annual show in LA called The Best of France and Italy. There's a guy there who comes with his late production BiTurbo. It's the nicest BiTurbo I've ever seen. I believe it has a body kit but it looks good on the car. If you're serious about it, and depending on your budget, might be worth a look.
     
  7. johnireland

    johnireland Formula 3
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    Thanks...I go there every year myself. A great casual car get together. One year a guy brought a Lancia Delta Integrale...he had it registered in Montana...my god it was sweet. They made a very small (25 total) coupe based on the chasis/engine...called the Hyena. Saw one in Brescia last May...not officially a Zagato, but based on Zagato's style. The Biturbo Racing would be another great one to have here in the states...maybe Trump (if re-elected) can loosen up the import rules even more than they have been...maybe override California's laws by some means. I wish the new/current Maseratis had stayed smaller and more nimble. I just don't think America needs a big Italian Mercedes. Let's hope Maserati and Alfa can survive in this country.
     
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  8. 67bmer

    67bmer Formula Junior
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    It is FINALLY awesome to see the biturbo get a little respect and admiration!

    Producing a carburated turbo charged car was a big mistake in my opinion! Especially one intended to compete with injected BMWs. Once they injected them, they were very decent cars for the time period. The bodies and interior were definitely not as durable as a BMW or Mercedes.
     
  9. 67bmer

    67bmer Formula Junior
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    somewhere out there, possibly even this forum, is a cutaway of the new 2.9l Alfa V6 turbo. I have looked and can not find it any longer. However, that engine looks very much like an updated DOHC 4V Maserati V6 biturbo engine.
     
  10. F456M

    F456M Formula 3
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    I prefer 16 cylinders with twin crankshafts.
     
  11. F456M

    F456M Formula 3
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    It was said that injection was «too complicated» and puls not be the future. So manufacturer would return to carburettors. Many can manufacturers used carbs on the lower spec models all the way up to 1990 and over that too.

    I had a conversation with a guy who had a new 325i and than he later bought a 425, he said the quality and performance of the car was superior to the BMW. Interior was many steps above the BMW. So it could be that the cars were pretty nice when brand new. They just got older much faster than the other volume manufacturers like BMW and Mercedes.....



    QUOTE="67bmer, post: 146825661, member: 186210"]It is FINALLY awesome to see the biturbo get a little respect and admiration!

    Producing a carburated turbo charged car was a big mistake in my opinion! Especially one intended to compete with injected BMWs. Once they injected them, they were very decent cars for the time period. The bodies and interior were definitely not as durable as a BMW or Mercedes.[/QUOTE]
     
  12. TBigs

    TBigs Formula Junior

    Mar 23, 2010
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    I have had my '89 Spyder for a couple of years now and love it. It's a rocket when the turbos kick in, which is at a reasonably low rpm. I can't imagine the BMWs competing, performance wise, with these later injected cars in period. With so few imported equipped with a 5-speed, it's a wonder that they are still so cheap in North America. Get'em while you can!

    BTW, the guy in the very first picture in this thread looks like he may very well be the most interesting man in the world. I'd always thought that he would drive a vintage Maserati!
     
  13. staatsof

    staatsof Six Time F1 World Champ
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    I think that's Adolfo Orsi but it's really tough to be sure.

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    Walter might know?

    As for the Early carb versus FI last V6 Detomaso era originated Biturbos. Both can be quite nice reliable cars but the 4V engines are more difficult to maintain and have that odd chain at the rear of the heads to link the camshafts. That design has issues. They were always lighter duty cars than the BMWs. Stuff breaks easier. The engineering is nowhere near as thorough. How could it be? They didn't have the budget for that. I still have my 84 from new and it's a very comfortable car. I'm still upgrading things on it too, it's a never ending job. I took a prize for it at Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix a few years back. It's not been restored but reasonably well maintained. So it is possible.

    If you want serious help for these cars we have some very serious people with global reach including a Mclaren engineer who owns a Ghibli Cup. Biturbozentrum on Yahoo Groups. It's a very funky old website with a lot of good info and qualified people on it.
     
  14. wbaeumer

    wbaeumer F1 Veteran
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    Mar 4, 2005
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    No, its NOT this individual with the beard in the red Maserati A6G-Zagato. In the car is the person to whom I brokered the car some years ago.
     
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