News

Anyone know a shop that can reduce a brake pad's thickness?

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by Steve Magnusson, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. Steve Magnusson

    Steve Magnusson F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa

    Jan 11, 2001
    18,159
    Texas
    Full Name:
    Steve Magnusson
    I finally needed to replace my TR front brake pads, but I've found the EBC DP2753 Greenstuff pads that TireRack sold me are too thick. They put me in touch with the US-based EBC guy (who initially confirmed with his English EBC sources that the new overall thickness for a TR front pad+backing plate should be 15mm and not the 17mm that DP2753 has become -- they added a wear-out sensor for another application and increased the pad thickness), but he's totally blown me off.

    I guess, naively, I thought it wouldn't be a big deal to have the 2mm removed, but I can't seem to find anyone who can do this -- does anyone have any ideas/sources/past experience with such a thing?
     
  2. Verell

    Verell F1 Veteran
    Owner Consultant

    May 5, 2001
    6,951
    Groton, MA
    Full Name:
    Verell Boaen
    SAND THE PADS DOWN
    Was in a shop that rebuilt it's own brake shoes. The new ones were rivited on (before the days of bonded brake shoes). After the shoes were mounted on the car, a machine was mounted on the axle that sanded them perfectly round. It was basicly a disc sander with mounting brackets for axle spindle & adapter for the rear lug pattern.

    Anyway this led me to think of taking the pads to a woodworking shop & having them sand them down. Use a sanding guide that keeps them parallel to the wheel. Take some calipers along th verify that you've got the thickness right & aren't sanding at an angle.
     
  3. Brian C. Stradale

    Brian C. Stradale F1 Rookie
    Lifetime Rossa

    Mar 17, 2002
    3,603
    Dallas, TX, USA
    Hmmm... shouldn't be a big deal. The Carbotech Panther Plus pads I got for my 360 were a couple mm too thick also... Norwood ground them down for me when they installed the pads. At the very least, you can call James or Ken at Norwood to get details on how they do that. If you still can't find a solution in Denver, they're easy enough to mail to Dallas.

    Norwood Performance
    972-831-8111
     
  4. Darolls

    Darolls F1 Veteran
    BANNED

    Jul 2, 2003
    6,799
    Full Name:
    Sparky
    Verell-

    You and I are both from the 'Old School'; I don't think that the 'kids' today even know what you're talking about. Yep, inhouse we use to relign rivited brake shoes; and then grind them to the circumference of the brake drum.

    I guess the thickness of a disc pad, could easily be cut down with a belt sander, but be careful, as a belt sander cuts very quickly!
     
  5. BigHead

    BigHead Formula Junior

    Oct 31, 2003
    992
    Outside of Boston
    Full Name:
    Dennis
    One should add that if you're going to sand down the pads yourself, be very careful, as pad material can be very carcinogenic.

    vty,

    --Dennis
     
  6. rexrcr

    rexrcr Formula 3

    Nov 27, 2002
    1,572
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Full Name:
    Rob Schermerhorn
    Vertical milling machine. Used to mill them all the time. Use a vacuum as you mill for dust control and wear a dust mask.
     
  7. REM9

    REM9 Karting

    Jun 17, 2001
    173
    Finger Lakes NY, USA
    Full Name:
    rem9
    I have done this a number of times for cars in my collection and ones we prep for vintage racing. I am in Upstate NY but if you can't find any other solution closer to home , I can help you with those.

    Russ
     
  8. REM9

    REM9 Karting

    Jun 17, 2001
    173
    Finger Lakes NY, USA
    Full Name:
    rem9
    I do have a machine shop and would use a Bridgeport milling machine to do the task. Do not attempt to hand sand them, the dust is nasty and you won't be able to get them flat enough to give you dependable brakes especially at speed. E-mail me off-line if you have questions.

    Russ
     
  9. Steve Magnusson

    Steve Magnusson F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa

    Jan 11, 2001
    18,159
    Texas
    Full Name:
    Steve Magnusson
    Thanks for all the good feedback/suggestions. I too am thinking along the lines of a more woodworking-type process (milling/planing).

    Russ -- thanks much for your kind offer, but please tell me how I can email you (perhaps via a Private Message) -- your Profile won't allow me to email you via FChat.
     
  10. Verell

    Verell F1 Veteran
    Owner Consultant

    May 5, 2001
    6,951
    Groton, MA
    Full Name:
    Verell Boaen
    Russ, no question about the dust being nasty, but a good shop will have a vacuum dust pickup system that'll take care of it.

    Also, I must quibble about sanding accuracy. With a good sanding guide setup & medium grit (120 or 150) sandpaper on a disc sander you can hold parallism & thickness to within a mil or 1.5mil which is plenty good enough. Just make some dry runs with hardwood blocks to make sure you've got everything setup.

    If you're thinking about a belt sander, I concur, the control isn't there.
     

Share This Page