News

ARRIVABENE LEAVING FERRARI...

Discussion in 'F1' started by The Strad, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. nerofer

    nerofer F1 Veteran

    Mar 26, 2011
    9,410
    FRANCE
    John Surtees was indeed a complex character; to this - and I won't comment further, because we would be derailing the thread for good - we have to add that Surtees had a difficult and tense relationship with Mike Parkes; basically, Parkes didn't like the fact that Surtees was a racing driver who thought he could also be a good engineer, and Surtees didn't like the fact that Mike Parkes was an engineer who thought he could be a good racing driver, so these two were not really on speaking terms, which added tension in the team.

    Rgds
     
    william, 375+ and 635CSI like this.
  2. spirot

    spirot F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Dec 12, 2005
    9,669
    Atlanta
    Full Name:
    Tom Spiro
    Yep/ Oui! - that part of the 60's was an interesting time in Racing as technology was expanding rapidly ... and engineering was becoming much more integral to racing.. and Surtees was still of the "seat of the pants" driver who wanted to engineer the car.
     
    william likes this.
  3. william

    william F1 World Champ

    Jun 3, 2006
    11,746
    England
    Full Name:
    William Denoyelles

    You are correct.
    I just can't remember the other race where Surtees drove for Ferrari after his departure.
     
  4. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Oct 31, 2016
    7,062
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Full Name:
    Joe R Gonzales
    Technical; word of the year for 2019. Binotto and Vettel have it. There is a or was a feud going on within the ranks of Ferrari. I like the way Piero "graciously" admits Camilleri "needs work."

    Piero Ferrari explains the revolution: "We gave technical continuity to the Scuderia"

    The vice-president of the Cavallino has motivated with Gazzetta dello Sport the change at the top of the Sports Management with Binotto instead of Arrivabene. And Piero also blinds the role of CEO of Louis Camilleri: "He has just arrived, let him work".

    The appointment of Mattia Binotto to Ferrari team principal gave a boost to the stock market on the Cavallino titles which, after a series of rebates, began to grow again, a sign that the uncertainty that prevailed in the Scuderia was also influencing the titles.

    Piero Ferrari, in his role as vice-president and shareholder, had an active role in the revolution at the top of the Racing Department that led to the release of Maurizio Arrivabene, to give full powers to Mattia Binotto.

    "Everything happened before Christmas - said the son of the founder to the Gazzetta dello Sport - then for various reasons we had decided not to divulge the decision. I do not want to go into details, also because I can only speak as a shareholder, but I only say that there was a confrontation between us members, with John Elkann and in the end we acted in the exclusive interest of Ferrari ".



    You have followed the plan that was Marchionne ...
    "You wrote a little 'all, but we wanted to preserve the technical continuity, without creating any disturbance in the structure of the Scuderia."

    Piero also launches another very clear signal ...
    "I say that we must allow enough time to work on Louis Camilleri who has just arrived in Ferrari and undoubtedly has his own style, different from that of Marchionne, which is in turn unique and inimitable".

    This statement extinguishes the rumors of those who spoke of resounding returns to Maranello: Stefano Domenicali, current president and CEO of Lamborghini, was among the names sifted in Turin to succeed Marchionne after the premature death of the president. The former team principal is very close to Binotto: he was part of managerial poker, together with Luca Colajanni and Mario Almondo who grew up together in the Cavallino's ranks, climbing the various stages of the Racing Department.

    And there are those who would not exclude from the game even Alfredo Altavilla, Sergio's right arm who left, slamming the door when he was preferred to Mike Manley at the FCA summit. A recovery, very, very difficult but for some not impossible ...

    Piero Ferrari prefers to placate the waters: the budget of the Cavallino that will be presented will be a record and, eventually, there will be time to review the managerial structure. The important thing is that now the 670 single-seater proves to be able to fight for the world title with Sebastian Vettel and Charles Leclerc ...


    https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=it&u=https://it.motorsport.com/f1/news/piero-ferrari-spiega-la-rivoluzione-abbiamo-dato-continuita-tecnica-alla-scuderia/4321790/&prev=search
     
    Doug23 and sammysaber like this.
  5. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Oct 31, 2016
    7,062
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Full Name:
    Joe R Gonzales
    Arrivabene linked with Sauber role according to some english and Italian articles.
     
  6. DF1

    DF1 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed

    Apr 10, 2007
    14,814
    BaWü
    https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/140983/anderson-ferrari-was-wrong-to-pick-binotto

    Ferrari made the "wrong decision" picking Mattia Binotto to replace Maurizio Arrivabene as its Formula 1 team principal, says former technical director Gary Anderson.

    Binotto took charge of Ferrari's engine development after its dismal performance at the start of F1's V6 turbo-hybrid era in 2014.

    He was then promoted to a role as overall technical chief in mid-2016 as part of an overhaul designed by then-president and CEO Sergio Marchionne.

    Ferrari has since produced two cars capable of fighting for wins on a regular basis, although errors from the team and Sebastian Vettel last season meant its title bid unravelled for a second season in a row.

    Speaking in a special 'live edition' of The Autosport Podcast on stage at Autosport International, former Jordan technical chief Anderson said: "Binotto is someone who has been very good at being a technical manager. You've got to allow him to be a technical manager.

    "That is a full-time job, seven days a week. It's not a part-time thing.

    "That is going to dilute their technical effort for sure.

    "I think it's the wrong decision. They should have brought someone else in."

    It is unclear who will replace Binotto as head of Ferrari's technical department, but there are suggestions the team may elect to simply hand more responsibility to aero chief Enrico Cardile and head of its engine department Corrado Iotti.

    Mercedes has dominated F1 since the engine rules changed for 2014, a regulation overhaul that Ferrari managed badly.

    It has taken Ferrari five years to consolidate its recovery from that mistake, although its best season statistically in a decade was still not enough to deny Mercedes another title double in 2018.

    Anderson said: "I don't really see why you would take your best technical person... and put him in a management, political position which is not his forte.

    "Why would you do that?"

    Binotto has been credited with having a calming influence over the departments he has been responsible for at Maranello, while Arrivabene was accused of creating a culture of pointing fingers when things went wrong.

    Anderson said that "you shouldn't have a blame culture, but somebody's responsible and you have to make sure you recognise why it failed and strengthen it" - and that it will not matter if Ferrari's team works better, if Binotto's move means the car is slower.

    He added: "You can easily throw away a couple of tenths of a second in the car and then you're scratching to get up there, be competitive and make all the right decisions."

    Anderson also warned that Ferrari could ultimately cost itself a prize technical asset with its policy of kicking underperforming team bosses out.

    He said: "What happens at the end of 2019 if Red Bull steps between them and suddenly Ferrari are third or fourth in the championship?

    "It could happen. [Then] his head's gonna roll.

    "They might lose a very good asset because they put him in a position he shouldn't be in."
     
  7. william

    william F1 World Champ

    Jun 3, 2006
    11,746
    England
    Full Name:
    William Denoyelles

    Gary Anderson has a point here.
     
    crinoid and LVP488 like this.
  8. DeSoto

    DeSoto F1 Veteran

    Nov 26, 2003
    5,381
    Yes, he has a good point, but for some reason his predictions are always wrong, so we shouldn´t worry.
     
    Igor Ound, 375+, 635CSI and 2 others like this.
  9. daytona355

    daytona355 F1 World Champ

    Mar 25, 2009
    10,133
    London
    Full Name:
    Sid Korshak
    Gary Anderson always has an opinion on every single thing, but I’ve never found his insights all that correct nor interesting. He may have a point with Binotto, but then again, does t everyone working within a company strive to move upwards within the organisation from the ‘doing’ departments to the ‘managing/political’ departments? Binotto is no fool, he will make a good team principal because he knows what is required, and has the support of those under and above him. Let’s give him the opportunity to demonstrate what he can do, and if it doesn’t work, they can always change it back
     
    jgonzalesm6 likes this.
  10. P.Singhof

    P.Singhof F1 Rookie

    Apr 19, 2006
    3,818
    Stuttgart, Germany
    Full Name:
    Peter Singhof
    Can they? Does it really work to put one a step back again after failing being promoted???
    I would say the risk is rather loosing him in case it does not work out as he might be burnt then for the team....
     
  11. daytona355

    daytona355 F1 World Champ

    Mar 25, 2009
    10,133
    London
    Full Name:
    Sid Korshak
    Depends on him really. The guy is a long time Ferrari employee, a true member of the family, so should the job prove to be out of his comfort zone, then I’m sure they can put support around him to manage away the more challenging parts to him and allowing him to concentrate on those areas he excels at.

    That said, as I said before, when you work for a company, you strive to get to the top, so I suspect Binotto will be enthused to meet the challenges that face him, and the guys that shuffle to take his place are also long standing Ferrari staff with every capability of continuing the evolution of his work
     

Share This Page