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B.I.M? How many of you are using it?

Discussion in 'Creative Arts' started by Darryl, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. Darryl

    Darryl Formula Junior

    Jan 4, 2006
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    Darryl
    How many of you are using BIM programs such as AutoCad or similar products?
    Is it truly a benefit in all phases of a project? I have heard many different stories (Pro's and Con's) from those whom use it locally, what's happening out there with others. I don't do high rise buildings where it would seem more appropriate? Your thoughts appreciated on this topic please. My clients or contractors are not asking for it in Southern California yet.
    We have had the AutoCad folks in to pitch us on the product but because of cost and down time we elected to stay away at this time due to the economy. The computer hardware must be upgraded to keep up with the new programs as well. We are currently using AutoCad 2009.
     
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  3. jsa330

    jsa330 F1 Veteran
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    I've had ArchiCAD since 2000; it's a great app but also what you'd call a "boutique" one.

    Autodesk Rules...many AutoCad firms are adding Revit. It's the boss BIM app now.
     
  4. Merc63

    Merc63 Rookie

    Apr 13, 2010
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    AutoCAD isn't really BIM. Revit is the BIM product in Autodesk's line. I know GSA is requireing all submissions to be in Revit now, though I don't know how many firms are actually doing it (GSA has always been really slack about making sure that contractors live up to the published standards).

    I've been using Revit since 2007, and it's definitely improving. Right now I have Revit 2010 Architectural, adn Revit 2010 MEP. They work together quite well for designwork. I have Revit Structural here, but I haven't actually used that, as I don't do structural engineering. I like it but it's really just one part of a complete BIM solution, and every good BIM solution has to be tailored to the firm using it, as it has to match their workflows and standards.
     
  5. jsa330

    jsa330 F1 Veteran
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    What's the suffix for Revit filenames?
     
  6. Merc63

    Merc63 Rookie

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    .rvt for the main files, .rfa for families, .rft and .rte for templates
     
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  8. BigTex

    BigTex Seven Time F1 World Champ
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    #6 BigTex, Apr 14, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2010
    BIM is the future but it's really expensive!!!

    Both hardware costs and software...

    I manage 5 'desks' running AutoCAD MEP2010 (that's $5k each + the workstation $$$) and don't forget dual monitors, BIG ones!

    Then on top of that we skipped RevIt and use Navisworks2010, which adds $10k cost, per seat.

    But it is very helpful in the coordination process, I am not happy in how it supports our prefab as even after all that I really don't get "working drawings" to properly support our efforts, without tons more sweat equity in notations and dimensioning.

    We are doing something wrong, or these people working for me are really stupid!!

    It does make a really pretty model, all different colors and stuff....and the information is embedded in there, I just cannot get it out!!!
     
  9. BigTex

    BigTex Seven Time F1 World Champ
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    #7 BigTex, Apr 14, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2010
    In the old days of petrochem , there was always a real Project Model in the meeting room, where you could follow supply lines and such....we are just doing it all now in the computer....

    BIM is now a contract requirement on projects over $10M or so......

    The AIA probably wrote that into the specs!!!!

    *poke*

    My Shell project, for instance, is a $300M total value..
     
  10. BigTex

    BigTex Seven Time F1 World Champ
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    In high rises, as well as hospitals and lab or research facilities it's all but essential now.......
     
  11. jsa330

    jsa330 F1 Veteran
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    Can these be converted to .dwg or is Revit completely standalone?
     
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  13. Merc63

    Merc63 Rookie

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    You can export DWG files from Revit, but you have to remember, these are fundamentally different concepts. While there are 3D DWG files, they are not the same thing. Revit models are parametric models, where a wall isn't merely a set of lines, but a completely modeled structure that knows it's orientation, core, inner and outer materials, etc. Windows, doors, ducting, and the like are individual items with their own internal structure, very unlike say, AutoCAD blocks. They are smart items and know how they connect with other items in the model. AutoCAD blocks are graphical representations of items, but really have no intelligence on how they are connected to the drawing. There aren't any "layers" in Revit. AutoCAD information is built on layering.
     
  14. jsa330

    jsa330 F1 Veteran
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    Revit sounds very close to ArchiCAD, which I've had for ten years. ArchiCAD is primarily intended as a 3D BIM program, but the 2D tools can be used to do traditional plan-elevation-section drawings, with a file extension of .dxf. This can be converted to .dwg for export to AutoCAD users; similarly, 2D .dwg files can be imported.

    The 3D BIM program stands on its own, as does Revit, and I don't remember the file extensions right off. I've only used the 3D tools to create massing and light/shadow studies.

    Regarding layering, ArchiCAD utilizes this throughout the process, be it 2D or 3D BIM. Sounds like there's a fundamental program structure difference betweeen ArchiCAD and Revit.

    Like the human brain, I only use it to 5% capacity.
     
  15. Merc63

    Merc63 Rookie

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    What I always say is that Revit is like the expensive, professional version of Broderbund 3D Home Architect, that you can get for $10 at any software store. That's been a parametric 3D modelling program for a couple decades, and only now are the majors doing the same thing in a professional arena.

    ArchiCAD's latest versions look a lot like Revit, and are kind of like Bentley Microstation is to AutoCAD.
     
  16. alfas

    alfas Formula Junior

    Sep 17, 2009
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    chicago
    there's also Vectorworks which is a B.I.M.

    http://www.nemetschek.net/architect/index.php

    I've used it a bit, older versions. and find it to be a very capable tool on a much smaller budget... It was BIM before BIM was cool.

    Perfect for a smaller office and supports Mac & PC.

    It's worth a look...
     

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