News

Becoming a Ferrari technician

Discussion in 'Chicago' started by Nukelove, Apr 12, 2016.

  1. Nukelove

    Nukelove Rookie

    Apr 12, 2016
    3
    #1 Nukelove, Apr 12, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2016
    I know that this topic has probably been beat to death on here however after googling the subject, i couldn't find any recent posts. So my question is how can I start working for a Ferrari dealer as a technician. I am 20 years old, I"ll be 21 in June. My background has been with german cars. When i was 18 i started working at Volkswagen while i was going to UTI. After graduating in 2014, and realizing that the "apprenticeship" i was promised was more of a lube tech position where i would do tires, oil changes and recalls all day, I looked around for another job and I got a job at a Porsche dealer. I'm starting to get all the testing done to get certified. Would that be enough to get a chance at an apprenticeship at a Ferrari dealer? How much do Ferrari dealer technicians make in Chicago? What do you do during the winter? Is it worth switching while I'm still young?
     
  2. muk_yan_jong

    muk_yan_jong Formula Junior

    Oct 11, 2008
    411
    #2 muk_yan_jong, Apr 14, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
    Find a good independent (read 20+ years on ONLY Ferraris/Masers/Lambos) who would be willing to take on an apprentice. Your starting pay might be lower but for now gain experience. Move if necessary.

    I'd argue to stay in a high-volume place for a little longer to learn about f-ups when the repair parts are cheap, but that's just my experience with rookies. Our Service Manager hired a few UTI grads (they were cheap. no offense.) at FoW and they were fast removed. Not much you learned in there applies in the Italian world.

    You aren't going to learn or make sack jhit at a Ferrari dealership anymore. Seasoned techs are retired or running their own shops. New cars are just recalls, lube tech, and tires/brakes with the factory network connection telling you what to do. Would just be a dealer name on a resume. In the current world that means near nothing.

    Take this as information and nothing personal.
     
  3. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 29, 2004
    26,949
    Austin TX
    Full Name:
    Brian Crall
    I strongly encourage you to read and believe the last paragraph of post #2. It is very good information.

    If that does not dissuade you go to Continental Ferrari in Hinsdale and get an interview with Gary Kral. He is in the Service Manager. We've met and he's a nice guy. Plead your case to him. A Ferrari shop, dealer or not is not the best place to be in the automotive business by a very big margin and it requires someone who really wants to do it to put up with all the downsides.

    As bad an idea I think it is if they think you are passionate enough about the brand you might have a chance.
     
  4. INTMD8

    INTMD8 F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    Jun 10, 2007
    5,372
    Lake Villa IL
    Full Name:
    James Moran
    When I started working on cars a little over 20 years ago all of the older techs said get out when you are still young and do something else.

    I didn't listen to them but I should have.

    I'm making the best of it but working on cars (fun ones or not) is not as glorious as it sounds!
     
  5. Nukelove

    Nukelove Rookie

    Apr 12, 2016
    3
    I did speak to both lake forest sports cars and to gary at continental ferrari, lake forest says that they want at least 5-6 years of experience with european cars. Gary at continental ferrari said that first of all i have to be 21, so i have to wait until june, and he also said to send in my resume and he would call me if there are any openings. I enjoy working on cars, its one thing i consider myself good at. I guess my question is, at porsche im turning about 50-80 hrs almost consistantly. Im an apprentice and my mentor doesnt do any work. He watches me work and drinks coffee. I work on anything from customers daily driven cars to track cars to aircooled porsches and even a few carrera gt's. I really enjoy working on cars. Im just curious as to if it's worth it to switch from porsche to ferrari. Can you make good money working at a ferrari dealer? What happens during the winter? Would i be taking a long term financial hit because there are less ferrari's on the road than porsche's which i would assume means less work?
     
  6. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 29, 2004
    26,949
    Austin TX
    Full Name:
    Brian Crall
    Well I never worked flat rate and have never had an employee on it nor would I. To me it is responsible for most of the problems in the service side of the industry.
     
  7. Nukelove

    Nukelove Rookie

    Apr 12, 2016
    3
    In my opinion it seems like there is a good and a bad side to working flat rate, it's good if the work is there and there is a lot of it but at the same time if there isn't any work and you make guarantee, (thats if the shop even has guarantee, I know a few without it) then you're potentially screwed. Another problem with it is the possibility of the quality of work going down just to get more work in. It encourages bad habits. I do see that working on say, Ferrari's, there probably isn't a lot of work like there would be at Porsche. Also if i'm not mistaken, I read somewhere that it's almost impossible to beat the book sometimes working at a Ferrari dealer, which would make it more beneficial to technicians to stay hourly. So my question is at this point, being an apprentice at Porsche for about a year or so, soon to be on the line, do you think it would be a good idea to change companies? Would I be making a bad longterm financial decision by leaving Porsche and starting at Ferrari? Is there good money to be made working for Ferrari or is it just a rumor i heard that isn't true.
     
  8. muk_yan_jong

    muk_yan_jong Formula Junior

    Oct 11, 2008
    411
    There is no money if you are in it just to wear a shirt with a Cavallino on it.

    Your only reward will come with time and experience gathering symbiotic (read non-internet) customers who respect and trust your work and knowledge. You can make a pretty OK living but it will involve a LOT of headache. You would not believe the absurdity sometimes.

    I maintain my position to behave like a aspiring monk trying for acceptance to a kung-fu school. There are a diminishing number of true craftsmen and a small percentage of those who might have the patience to train.
     
  9. muk_yan_jong

    muk_yan_jong Formula Junior

    Oct 11, 2008
    411
    And to follow... Flat rate sucks. I currently work at a high-volume dealership as a Service Writer (250+ cars/day) and we all struggle to make anything. Mgmt takes it all. Techs are letting their certs expire so they dont have to do certian work anymore. Customers all expect "complimentary" maintenance and will buy something new before any out of pocket maintence and upkeep is due. I spend more time pairing f nking phones to Bluttooth systems than fixing mechanical issues.
     
  10. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 29, 2004
    26,949
    Austin TX
    Full Name:
    Brian Crall
    No need for craftsmen because there are nearly no jobs for craftsmen.
     
  11. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 29, 2004
    26,949
    Austin TX
    Full Name:
    Brian Crall
    You think there is a good side only because you are young and inexperienced.
     
  12. bradford4809

    bradford4809 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 26, 2014
    5
    virginia
    Nukelove,
    Maybe I can add a little positivity to this thread. If you really love to work on cars,what else can you do? The good thing about this world is you only have to be great at 1 thing. VW, Porsche ,Ferrari ,stop bouncing around.I would either stay with Porsche and learn all you can and become an expert or go to mercedes and stay there for ten years and go out on your own.You will learn more at the dealership than any place else,if you want to learn.This trade has changed completely in my career of 40 years. We used to bang a hammer,now we bang a keyboard or sometimes our heads. I don't know anything about a ferrari tech job, but many mercedes mechanics ,including myself have made a nice living and gained a lot of respect from others. Your mentor just watching you work while he drinks coffee is doing you one of the BIGGEST FAVORS in your life. Do you think it would be better the other way around? You are turning 50 to 80 hours because he is there to catch you when you fall. I won't get into the flat rate discussion because you're no going to change that,but you can pick where you work. Take a look at the sales numbers for luxury cars in this country and I think you will see where the work will be in the future .Mercedes sells more cars in 2 weeks than jag sells all year in the USA. Good Luck, pm me if I'm not bored you by now
    bradford
     
  13. FiveLiterEater96

    FiveLiterEater96 Formula 3

    Nov 5, 2005
    1,710
    Illinois
    Full Name:
    Andrew
    There's a very good side; I ran a service department for years where guys worked eight hour days and managed to turn 12-18 on a regular basis. Sure, there will be a day or two where you only turn five or six, but thats part of it. If you're dedicated, skilled, and enjoy what you do, then working flat rate can be a very lucrative career. Granted, that you're working for a store where your management has your best interest in mind.
     
  14. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 29, 2004
    26,949
    Austin TX
    Full Name:
    Brian Crall
    And the customers paid 12-18 hours of labor for an 8 hour job.

    The flat rate system has been a direct cause of the costs of repairs. You need to over pay the good guys to support the dead beats and the customers pay the price.

    The shops have no downside to hiring dead beat mechanics and there is no incentive to do otherwise.

    You fill the shop with warm bodies, some make you a lot, some make you a little and its all good.
     
  15. FiveLiterEater96

    FiveLiterEater96 Formula 3

    Nov 5, 2005
    1,710
    Illinois
    Full Name:
    Andrew
    Sure they do, its called liability. Do you want some 'dead beat' working for you that could potentially cost you a fortune when he makes a rookie mistake and grenades a motor? Heck no!

    Again, I acknowledge that there are ****ty, scumbag-ran shops out there that don't stand behind their work but believe it or not, there are still a number of reputable, honest service facilities out there with good men and women making an honest living.
     

Share This Page