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Beginner Model maker

Discussion in 'Collectables, Literature, & Models' started by Jeff348, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. Jeff348

    Jeff348 Formula Junior

    Aug 2, 2005
    607
    S.I.New York
    Full Name:
    jeff spezzano
    Hey Guys I 've been think of something to do on these cold winter days and nights. I 've built a few models in my time but I always had problem when it came time to paint the cars outer body. You really can do it right with a spray can. I want to get a air brush. What is the best kind? how much should I spend? Can I use my compressor in my garage or is it too big? Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. Fast_ian

    Fast_ian Two Time F1 World Champ

    Sep 25, 2006
    23,267
    Campbell, CA
    Full Name:
    Ian Anderson
    Hi Jeff,

    My 02c:

    - You can now get very, very good results with "rattle cans" - The Tamiya "TS" series is particularly recommended - Indeed their rattle can grey primer is the current "state of the art" for highlighting flaws prior to starting the "finish" coats - If it's flawed in gray, it *will* be flawed in the finish.....

    Having said that, the "artisans" will certainly use an A/B for finish coats for it's finer control etc.

    - Yes, you can use your shop compressor, just be sure to turn the outlet pressure *way* down - Most A/B'ing is done between ~15 and 30psi (max!). Make sure you have a good moisture and oil filter in the line.....

    - Choice of brush? - Many, many choices - I happen to like the "dual action" types where depressing the trigger starts the airflow and pulling it back starts the paint flow. Others swear that single action is the way to go.....

    The "Formula1 modelling" site has many threads on the subject - Here's a reasonable start:

    http://www.f1m.com/main/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=12335

    As with all (most?) things, the more you pay, the better the product - I like Badger (been around forever, good support & service) but outside of the usual Chinese "knock-off" crap there are many others - Iwata, Paasche etc.

    You've also got to keep it *clean* - This is where many frustrations come from..... If you choose a siphon feed get at least 5x (!) the # of jars you think you'll want - Immediately you finish spraying, remove the paint jar and replace it with the appropriate thinner (often water for the first clean) and spray until it's clear..... Put it down, allow the paint to dry inside it and you're hosed!..... [Don't ask how I know this ;)]

    HTH, cheers,
    Ian
     
  4. the_stig

    the_stig F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 19, 2005
    3,360
    I use a Badger 150 dual-action, not the best in the world but cheap, readily available replacement parts, durable, comes with 3 different needles and tips. I also use a tiny compressor but that's mostly for portability and noise. The shop compressor is fine.

    It's not that you can't get a good finish from a rattle can it's just so hard to get the right balance between flooding the darn thing or going on dry and getting grainy finishes.
     
  5. Jeff348

    Jeff348 Formula Junior

    Aug 2, 2005
    607
    S.I.New York
    Full Name:
    jeff spezzano
    I agree with you about the can. I have gotten descent finishes with a can but not consistently. I wonder if it's my lack of skill. Do you think that you can be more consistent with an air brush? I realize it still takes some skill. thanks for your help.
     
  6. the_stig

    the_stig F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 19, 2005
    3,360
    Yes, definitely, because the volume of paint is far far lower and your control is much more fine.
    I've painted 1/18 diecasts with rattle cans and got results that rivaled a pro body shop but I don't know that I'd care to try that with 1/43.
     
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