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  1. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    Having spent the best part of 2019 looking and hitherto failing to find a decent Ferrari 360 for decent money (c. £55k), I thought I would share some of my findings. I hope that it will help guide others like me in future and shed some light on these cars (..also hoping it may ease some of my personal FRUSTRATION..). And believe me, there is a lot of murkiness that anyone without endless wealth needs to be aware of.

    Those that are lucky enough to possess endless wealth may scoff and proclaim that those without bags of cash to throw around shouldn't think about buying these cars (it's a valid point to make); the fact is these are entry-point Ferraris. There are often many available for sale, and starting at under 50 grand (in the UK), they are accessible for many petrolheads. So why should those thinking of buying a 991 Carrera not be allowed to consider owning a Ferrari? They can and they will.

    NB: I am no mechanical expert on these cars, but I am hoping that by virtue of this I might make a little more sense to those that are also new to the field. Oh, and by the way, I truly love the 360 as a car when all is well. I want to make that clear. They are superb cars (hence, why I am still looking). But that's the crux of the matter here. Any kind of machine is ultimately defined by its efficiency, because when it doesn't operate it can't be loved. So you might as well drive a red ball of snot around, for all that's worth. Try to deny it, but every car owner dearly wants their car to work, far more often than it doesn't. This isn't a German state of mind, it's just rational car ownership in 2019.


    So let's start at the beginning..


    1. Mythical "Ferrari" valuations, and everything else.

    At present, Ferrari 360s are wildly overpriced. But ALL Ferraris make money over time!!?, I hear you cry? I'm not here to deny that. All I will suggest is that there is a somewhat mythical valuation system that all sellers of 360s bank on YOU believing. Either they overpaid for the car in the first place or they are literally willing to wait YEARS for the "right (idiotic) buyer" to come along.. I see the same achingly dull spec cars that are closer to 80 grand (when they should be closer to 50 grand) simply not selling. Search after search, the same overpriced cars not selling. It's actually weirdly gratifying to see this, but also excruciatingly frustrating (as a buyer) by the same token. Well-priced cars will (probably) sell, be they bags of **** or not, but don't be fooled into thinking higher-priced cars are in better condition. They will probably have been sat for years, slowly rotting away underneath the many layers of wax and showroom lighting. Why are they not selling? Regardless of the Ferrari myths, 50% of prospective 360 buyers already believe that most are overpriced and the other 50% knows how problematic these cars (especially the F1s) can be. Sadly, a lot of these cars have become showroom trophies, "appreciating assets" based on a more realistic reality attached to rarer / newer / more in-demand Ferrari models. Just don't attach it to 360s. Once the market adjusts its perception of these cars, only then will they actually SELL (hint hint to all traders...) at more realistic price points. Call it the jealous cries of someone with a lowly (it isn't lowly, it's sensible..) budget, but why do I see perfect red spec examples dropping by five grand overnight...? And they're still not selling...? Just reporting what I'm seeing!



    2. The Ferrari 360 is the endless nightmare you imagined it could be.

    For the purposes of brevity, I'm just going to list the problems I have faced (either pre- or post-sale) with just TWO cars. Two. One car I owned and rejected. The other I have had PPId. I will also give you an idea of how much these issues would be to fix (based on quotations I've had from Ferrari specialists - this is another area in and of itself). Remember these cars were both being sold by traders and as anyone would expect, are being sold in good faith on the basis they are mechanically sound..

    (I did believe that's the world we generally live in..buttttt, maybe not when it comes to Ferraris.. more on that later)


    • intermittent flashing F1 light / loss of gears / flat bed recovery needed multiple times (even after hours of diagnosis the problem wasn't diagnosed) TCU (trans ECU) changed (£500-1500 change), clutch position sensor changed (£600 - some quote for gearbox out ((+ £1000)), some don't) - clutch position sensor fault still showing
    • the above problem may be attributed to inner gearbox corruptions (gearbox out to diagnose £1000), (full clutch kit changed offered as potential solution (£3500-4000), also potentially attributed to wiring loom issues (£??? - electronic issues obviously hard to stick a price on)
    • timing phase variator fault code found (top end vaiators rebuild job £2500-£3500) or cam timing issue (c. £1-2000 in labour alone) (NB: early 360s need to have had the variator recall done, do your research here)
    • F1 pump changed (c. £350 + labour)
    • steering rack leak (c. £350 refurb)
    • two bad O2 sensors (c. £500)
    • high leak-off rate on F1 solenoid valves (1-6 valves need changing £??? (mainly labour intensive + F1 bleed needed but never worked out)
    • bad throttle potentiometer (didn't get a quote for this as fixed by dealer)
    • ball joint + track rod end (quoted around £1200 which is probably too high - another side issue, see below..)
    • knackered door locks (5 hrs labour c. £400)
    • both cars had 50% + clutch wear, one nearer 70% - so imminent clutch change (£3500) needed in both cases in near-term future

    SO. I think that was just about it. Two cars and a four-month experience. Thankfully, due to using my brain / having a warranty, none of this was chargeable to me, aside from some diagnosis costs. "Pandora's Box," doesn't quite do it justice.

    These cars are ENDLESSLY COMPLEX, and forever breaking (apparently). There is a decent amount of tech on these cars (think of them more as race cars, than road cars) that is being used uncomfortably ahead of its own time (F1 'box, in particular). And sure, they're around 20 years old, and maybe it's par for this particular course. Certainly, a manual gearbox will remove the hydraulic and electronic issues associated with the F1, but remember, the F1 has an ECU that monitors it. Manuals don't. So your manual could have a shagged clutch, release bearing (particularly the seals), flywheel, synchros or bushes and aside from obvious signs you may walk headfirst into this in time and you have no way of knowing in advance (other than the basic trans window). Even my old 911 997 clutch went overnight within two weeks of purchase, even after perfectly normal test drives. These gearboxes are clearly used hard and suffer wear, by nature of the car. Making matters EVEN WORSE, is that very few seem to know how to actually change a clutch efficiently, meaning it can need doing AGAIN (ka-ching ka-ching) ahead of time (some 10-15,000 miles ahead of time). And that's just the transmission side of things. The 360 is both a relatively affordable and catastrophic minefield in the making.



    3. The Ferrari industry WILL exploit your "wealth," if you allow it to.

    Just to give you an idea, a simple microcosm of what I mean. The 360 will go through suspension ball joints with regularity. This is well known. Changing them, at face value (the part is a couple hundred quid) seems relatively affordable to have to keep doing with regularity. And yet one specialist garage will insist on four hours to change one, while another will only need one hour. Perhaps one specialist is more special than another, but patently, there is a greater or lesser degree of exploitation at work here. And for me, this all ties into point # 1. There is a total misconception of the realistic values of anything attributable to these cars, be it valuations, purchase prices or the work needed to maintain them. Again, for the massively wealthy this isn't a true concern, but for those buying cheaper Ferraris it HAS to be, and it most definitely should be.

    Added to this is the cycle of **** that this exploitation (coupled with the car's inherent complexity) will throw up at a later date - most probably at your door. Things (if not the car itself) will get left, ignored and simply never diagnosed. This may even snowball to the extent that the car you're looking at right now might bear the most beautiful Pininfarina shell, yet underneath there's hiding a large blank cheque with your name artfully written in the payer section.

    To offer one quick example of potential exploitation.. the F1 is famous for failing / leaking actuators. This is when your gearbox won't be able to correctly select gears. Most will probably sell you a new one at an eye-watering £6,000. Others might suggest refurbishing (£2,000), others will tell you about the problems they are still facing with refurbed units and others will tell you they can take it apart and change a relatively simple pin inside the unit for a fraction of the money. Blind and endless wealth doesn't care, right? Not denying it. But again, most regular people of regular wealth won't even be made aware of these options. Welcome to Exploitation Land..



    4. Help isn't easy to find.

    Not only will Ferrari dealers and some specialists want to take more of your money than they should, depending on where you are located, they may literally never have any time for you in the first place. Would you hand your Ferrari over to anyone? Well, probably not. But can you actually find an indie Ferrari mechanic that isn't snowed under with work (a busy Ferrari mechanic..??), unless in the absolute depths of winter? No to that as well. So you'll most likely be sat in a pool of acute frustration as your happy-faced (and broken) £50,000+ acquisition grins at you in your drive.. almost as though it is laughing at and indulging in your plight.. Ahh, living that dream..

    Considering the amount of broken Ferraris out there (and my small survey would seem to suggest there are many), it is somewhat baffling how few specialist garages there are. And when you take into account how brief the British summer is, it is HIGHLY likely you will be without your summer-oriented investment for a good deal of it. Unless, of course, you are willing to attach a "rape me ASAP" placard to your rear end.

    I also have first-hand experience of garages that will happily engage in the "ignorance is bliss" philosophy. I politely asked one specialist about a specific car (on direction of the seller) they had recently major cambelt serviced (for an astronomical fee..) and their response was, "Well, we only changed the belts, how would we know anything else about the car?" Maybe they were having a bad day, but clearly there are those that care about your 360's endless needs and those that simply go through the motions. After a major service, I (and I think most) would expect a garage to have a fair idea of where a car is it. Maybe their "ignorance" was telling me all that I needed to know about the car in that particular case.

    Given the amount of research and through my experiences, I've concluded that I would implicitly trust a grand total of ONE garage in the UK to look after any future 360 I may own, in terms of both their knowledge and realistic pricing. Make of that what you will.


    5. PPIs are great, but...

    So you find that car that seems to tick all the boxes. PPI it. That's the wise advice, right? Well, sort of. Don't be surprised if the PPI throws up a number of issues though, and the deal is dead because of it. Going back to point # 1, the dealer will probably have overpaid for the car and simply won't have the margin to reflect the amount of remedial work needed to have the car in good mechanical health (as should be the realistic and honest expectation of any car buyer). I imagine most private sellers won't want to be told how bad they are at upkeep, either, and how much getting the car back to a decent condition will eat into any profit they had in mind. And this is when the "Well, it's a Ferrari...?" BS starts to take effect like a recurring nightmare. You WILL pay. You MUST pay! It's a Ferrari!?? Idiot.

    At this point, I feel like I could pay for an unending amount of PPIs without ever finding a deal that rationally makes sense. Moreover, you will most likely get absolutely fleeced for those PPIs. Paying anything beyond £300 for a couple of hours of specialist looking and plugging in is complete madness. Again, back to point # 1 (and # 3).


    6. It's a Ferrari..!?? (idiot..)

    So I will conclude by going back to this little industry idiom. Perhaps it pertains to all makers of supercars, but I think it holds special meaning for the 360, given its age, its complexities and its current price point. I have come out of this experience effectively believing that regardless of consumer rights, warranties, dealership promises and whatever else, it is basically an expectation that outside of common things we all accept when buying a used car (paint wear, interior wear, engine wear, suspension, brakes, pads, tyres etc etc) there is also the Enhanced Ferrari Experience mentality that you WILL ALSO expect the car to break repeatedly (in no time), and you WILL mop up the mess. Because you enjoy it so much. Because it's a Ferrari...Ahhh. I guess it's really up to you how much enjoyment you truly render from these Enhanced expectations.


    Buy a Porsche and stop moaning, is the obvious reaction to all of this. But that's really the point. This is Porsche money and sometimes Porsche people fancy a change. Sometimes.. I happen to think it's better these home truths are out there for those pondering over making that leap of faith. I hope this all helps someone in some capacity!
     
  2. EastMemphis

    EastMemphis Formula Junior
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    May 25, 2019
    400
    Memphis, TN
    Full Name:
    John
    So have you given up?
     
  3. J360M

    J360M Rookie

    Nov 29, 2018
    47
    Finding that dealer or specialist you can trust and building an honest and open relationship is key with owning a Ferrari. I have found one in particular in the UK that I trust fully. They genuinely care about your happiness as they know you will be loyal to them and provide repeat business. In return you get advice and support over the phone and they stand by their product which is either their service of your pride and joy or the sale of a Ferrari to you. I don’t think buying a 20 year old Ferrari is ever going to be hassle free, but there is the odd specialist who will stand by you... just need to find them.


    Sent from my iPhone using FerrariChat
     
  4. mmarksx19

    mmarksx19 Karting
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 9, 2018
    63
    I agree with some of your points. I bought a 360 spider in the UK in December (manual box as it was my first ferrari).
    I paid about £50k for the car which has galactic mileage for a ferrari (66,000) but it had a raft of paperwork and I used man maths to justify on the basis of it must have spent more time being driven than being fixed which is a good thing.
    It was a dream of mine to own one and now I do. It's far from perfect (Stone chips, paint swirls, some interior wear, aircon not working etc etc) but given its mileage I am not bothered to get them resolved. It will never be a high end ferrari price wise so I am happy to drive it and not worry.
    Parts pricing is ridiculous and there definitely is an attitude of 'if you worry about running costs don't buy one' which I disagree with. I'm not made of money so yes, if the car needs a £300 part it hurts. Luckily, there are reasonable arts if you do your homework. The coil packs for example are about £150 each in a ferrari box but the same part with the same part number is £30 bought from Bosch.
    Specialists are few and far between. There is one in Yorkshire that I know of but he seems honest and reasonable so I will be using him come service time.
    Luckily most 360s are 2nd cars (I have smart diesel as my daily car!!!!) So if it doesn't work I'm not stuck for transport - the concern there and agreeing with your points is that every slight noise makes you wince at the potential pain to the wallet.
    So far I have been lucky. I had an inlet air leak which the supplying garage paid to be fixed and now have a misfire which I think is ignition related so I'm going to change the plugs and coil packs. Other than that, the car sits outside all year and makes me smile every time I drive it.
    I hope you find the car for you, in my experience all the 360s need work so decide whether you can live with imperfection or want to spend big money on achieving it (and probably never will!!!)

    Sent from my BBF100-1 using FerrariChat.com mobile app
     
  5. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    nope, don't give up easy :)
     
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  6. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    #6 Rosso_United_1999, Jun 23, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
    i'm envious of your manual 'box car!

    £50k manuals literally don't exist at the moment, but I am thinking of waiting until winter to see if I can find someone that's keen to move on

    66k isn't so bad, I agree. it is on paper for some people (investors, more likely), but as you say, over that mileage you would expect a lot of things to have been encountered and dealt with

    The car I PPId was / is £58k, an F1 with a nearly dead clutch and approximately £1500 of work needed. So that gives you an idea of the current market

    and totally, it pays massively to check for alternative (non-Ferrari) parts (Maserati and Fiat parts always cheaper) and for a certain amount of DIYing (even if that just means researching into alternative options and alleyways)

    I really do think these cars *can* be reasonable to own and run, even at the lower levels of budget. I really do. but anyone can get caught out in major ways, too.

    I ran my Porsche really for nothing (after the clutch was changed), but that was mainly because I found a great local garage that didn't take the absolute piss

    On that... I forgot to mention.. I recently found out that one specialist indie Ferrari garage is charging £3,200 for a simple cambelt service (with a bonus tensioner pulley thrown in !!!). I am just appalled that people are made to pay this. There is almost an honour and pride about paying these ridiculous bills. That really needs to stop.


     
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  7. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    if you feel happy to, please PM me with your dealer! :)


     
  8. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    PS.. apparently cars that live outside have a tendency to misfire more. Does yours have the engine bay gutters?

     
  9. mmarksx19

    mmarksx19 Karting
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 9, 2018
    63
  10. greyboxer

    greyboxer F1 World Champ

    Dec 8, 2004
    10,575
    South East
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    Jimmie
    You sound too bitter to be comfortable and able to relax with the ownership experience - you're not going to change the world
     
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  11. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    North West England

     
  12. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    One person's "relax with a car" is another person's unwillingness to mop up passed-on situations with these cars that shouldn't be their responsibility

    Again, it's the "it's a Ferrari.." mentality..

    The last deal on a car I PPId was close to sealing but broke down because ultimately the trader didn't have enough margin to fix the car's knackered suspension.. So effectively I was asked to get the car through an MOT. Deal over. It shouldn't be like that!

    Not bitter, just clear-headed about it
     
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  13. mmarksx19

    mmarksx19 Karting
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 9, 2018
    63
    Personally I think you are being sensible. You have a budget, why buy a car at that budget that needs thousands spending on it?

    I'm West Yorkshire (Leeds way) if you are ever in the area I'd be happy to show you what my £50k bought. Like you I looked at and rejected a whole load of cars (possibly the same ones as they are still for sale) before I got mine. As I mentioned, it's no show winner but an honest car with a lot of work done on it by previous owners. I get to drive a ferrari and don't worry about minor issues or stone chips or adding mileage. That's not to say I don't look after it but I'm not obsessive over it.

    Sent from my BBF100-1 using FerrariChat.com mobile app
     
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  14. vinny84

    vinny84 Formula Junior
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    Nov 20, 2008
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    Full Name:
    Vince
    Sorry to say, but this is how Ferrari ownership works.

    If you want a bargain, you will get one but you get what you pay for. Expect to open up your wallet to fix everything that needs sorted.

    When shopping for my 360, I had the opportunity to buy a $55k car. In the end, I didn’t. I know better when it comes to buying a Ferrari. So I paid $20k more and got a much better car that was cared for, lower mileage, has all service records and has just done it’s major service less than a year ago with a reputable shop in the area I bought it from. Couldn’t be happier with the purchase and I still spent $21k when I got it to change out the headers, cats, exhaust and other miscellaneous things because I don’t want to have any pre cat problems or any other issues for at least a year.

    I think the only take away from your post is to find a really good independent Ferrari specialist that knows these cars inside out. I have found that shop and I will never take it anywhere else.
     
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  15. KC360 FL

    KC360 FL Formula Junior
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    Jun 20, 2017
    841
    Melbourne Florida
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    KGC
    #15 KC360 FL, Jun 23, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
    My take: There are a lot of choices out there in the form or many marques for a reasonable price. Ferrari made relatively (key word here) a lot of 360s. Finding homes for them all is tough. As you pointed out, there are quite a few available for sale. None moving too fast. The decent cars don't usually sell cheap. Cheap cars are usually cheap for a good reason. When you consider the average 360 sold for about 150K (on average) new, 75K for one is not really expensive in my book-- for a nice example. High mileage, questionable maintenance cars can be had for a lot less -- but then there's usually a good reason for that. It seems having a plethora of problems with a 360 usually only happens on high mileage and unloved cars.

    Having any car worked on these days is very expensive. Check and see what they charge to do work on a new Lexus out of warranty. I'm betting the maintenance costs related to a 360 out of warranty (of course all of them are) is probably in line and not as exorbitant as you may think. Hell I just spent $1400 to put Michelin's on my Ford P/U.

    I was a guy that did move from a Porsche 911 into my F1 360. Make no mistake the 911 had issues too. Shifter shaft bushings that simply broke apart, Odometer gear broke apart (at 36K miles and again at 46K miles) repaired the A/C system twice to the tune of $3000 in 6 years and more. Not a bad car. But it's not the Titanic of fortitude most want to believe. Have you heard about the GT3 engine failures of a few years ago?

    I've had my F1 360 for about 2 years now and while not a daily driver I have put over 3000 miles on it. I did my homework. It had a new clutch installed, a new dash, brakes, etc.-- all documented. I bought the car with about 22K miles on it. Comparable cars now on the market have not gone up or down much from when I bought mine. The car has been trouble free aside from replacing the coil packs, which I did myself: cost-- $400. I did the all the fluids and an oil change when I bought it and it will need the belts done here soon. The 360 is an incredibly reliable Ferrari. It's the model that turned Ferrari around from a finicky fussy car into an enjoyable, reliable car you don't need to carry your flatbed tow driver's number with you every time you take it out.

    Trouble is, like buying any 16 year old car, history is paramount. Most don't think so. Most want to believe what they are told and that they are getting a great deal that nobody else can see the value in.
    Sure you can be lucky OR unlucky. It can happen. You can get a "bad car". But for the most part issues develop from neglectful owners. Well cared for cars only seem expensive and while you don't always get what you pay for, a car that may seem overpriced probably isn't when you dig deeper into the cars history and ownership. In my thinking 360s with 7 or 8 previous owners or more means guys bought the car to drive the hell out of it and then passed it along before they had to pay the piper. The previous owner of my 360 had the car for 10 years (I'm the 3rd owner). To me that means the previous owner knew that he was going to keep the car awhile and abusing it was only going to cost him in the long run.

    I will agree that the prices seem too stable considering most are just sitting in someones garage or on the "used car" showroom floor. But these cars like any are going to reach a price point that nobody is willing to go below. It happens with all cars. You may think the 360s should be selling for less, but the fact is, most folks will be slow to reduce the price on them. And I'll admit, it makes little sense to me too. But most folks don't have to sell their 360s. Not like a used Toyota that just needs to be gone. I know a few guys that have nice Harleys that they have simply given up on selling in the current stagnant market for Harleys. They have said I'll keep it before I give it away in the depressed Harley Davidson market that exists today. Owners of 360 may feel the same and therefore the prices on these cars don't seem to see much movement down despite the length of time they are listed for sale.

    I don't think you need silly money to buy a 360. But expecting to buy one For what you want to pay and get a decent car is not the way to look at it. Just my 2 cents
     
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  16. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    appreciate the input. I am not here to name names, that's not the point of this, but the first car I bought and rejected was from a leading Ferrari specialist.. I didn't assume I would need such a car PPId because I put my faith in them.

    Yes, it's all anecdotal at the end of the day, but I don't think you can rely on anything with these cars outside of establishing ss much truth as you can. Trust no one, someone once said..

    The funny thing is is that I have just increased my budget. I am now looking at car 15 grand more than the first one i bought, and I'm finding cars that are both overpriced to begin with (for example, I PPId a £58k car that has been sat doing nothing in a dealership basement for TWO YEARS+). And I find it requires around £2k immediate work and £3.5k of near-term work.

    Blimey, that's a lot of exhaust work! I must admit I like to change the cats on a used car

     
  17. vinny84

    vinny84 Formula Junior
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    Vince
    I understand where you’re coming from. I think what you need is a little patience and you will find your car!

    Sometimes it’s hard to find the right car and sometimes you get lucky.

    I admit, I felt like I got lucky because it literally took me less than a month to find my 360. Usually not the case for some people.
     
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  18. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    Thanks for that. I think the US is a really interesting (and quite different) market to the UK one for 360s. I think a LOT of 360s made their way over there when the US economy was obviously popping, and it became THE classic "exotic" car, sort of devaluing it in a sense (the fact they are more common and considered somewhat of a cheap man's Ferrari - obviously this is relative!)

    Outside of London, I can't even remember the last time I saw a 360 in the UK. OK, I remember seeing one in Manchester once. You just don't see them so they have clung on to their exclusivity over here a bit more. That's good in one superficial sense (makes em feel more special), but it also keeps their value up over and above what they probably should value at

    I could be wrong but that's just the sense I get






     
  19. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118

    appreciate it!
     
  20. KC360 FL

    KC360 FL Formula Junior
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    Jun 20, 2017
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    Melbourne Florida
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    KGC
    yes. markets are different. US vs UK== can't really compare apples to oranges.;)
     
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  21. KC360 FL

    KC360 FL Formula Junior
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    Jun 20, 2017
    841
    Melbourne Florida
    Full Name:
    KGC
    exactly. Can't be in a hurry. I took my time and looked for over 6 months. I would have looked longer if the 360 I found didn't check all the boxes for me.
     
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  22. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    Yup. Been looking since January now *exhaustion face*
     
  23. 78bonanza

    78bonanza Karting

    Apr 1, 2018
    135
    Full Name:
    Jim Cear
    If you can find an owner/seller who understands the mechanical needs of the car and has been passionate about caring for it you will be off to a good start .....probably . If that person enjoys doing some of the basic work themselves , understands it and has done so perhaps so much the better.
    Best of luck on your search .
     
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  24. Rosso_United_1999

    Mar 31, 2019
    118
    Yes, I'm starting to see it that way. The level to which traders only give a **** about their financial bottom lines is actually a little scary.

    But then that ties back to my original points that these cars are often so wildly expensive to put right which forces up their price. In some cases, we're talking around 25% of the value of the car to actually make right. So clearly, traders are clinging on to every penny.

    I think there should be a duty of care and responsibility within the trade, but there really isn't. It's still basically the Wild West, when it boils down to it.

    So it does pose the question of whether traders are likely to offer any real benefits with these cars in particular.

    I really should put a wanted post up on this message board! if anyone has a (good) 360 they'd like to part with.... :)

     
  25. 360trev

    360trev F1 Rookie
    Project Master

    Oct 29, 2005
    3,461
    isle Of Man
    Full Name:
    360trev
    I've now owned my 360 since it was 2 years old and the 'current' model.

    Back when I purchased my 360 the market in the UK was very different. What your experiencing now is the fact that at one point the British Pound de-valued quite considerably against other currencies like the Australian Dollar and at this point literally many hundreds of 360 left the UK for good. In 2004 there where around 1,400 Ferrari 360's registered in the Uk. These days nearly 60% of that peak figure got either written off or exported (!) so only around 600 cars are left in the UK making them quite rare and a not very common sight anymore.

    I think you need to be realistic about the fact that these cars can be 20 years old now and not all of them are well looked after. On complexity I think the 360 is actually a very simple car to work on. Its not overly dependent on electronics and pretty easy to inspect to but a PPI is a must. I would take your budget and take 20% off it. Save that money for maintenance and find a good independent specialist to bring a car back up to where it needs to be. In the North West, Adam from AE Engineering is one of the well respected ex-Factory trained guys who knows 360's very well. Don't take it to a main dealer whatever you do.
     
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