News

car design thread

Discussion in 'Creative Arts' started by jm2, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    I think it needs to be more complicated :eek:
     
  2. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    9,457
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    Ferrari has it’s “special projects” department but I kinda think I’d go to Ken Okuyama, a handsome former professor at the Art Center College of Design, to order my custom Ferrari because he’s been there and done that for Ferrari, while he was at Pininfarina...

    http://mycarquest.com/2019/06/design-analysis-a-custom-ferrari-by-an-ex-ferrari-designer.html

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
    jm2 likes this.
  3. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Ken is a great designer.
    Started his career at GM Design.
    Did the Enzo.
     
    anunakki and of2worlds like this.
  4. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    colombo2cam and Isobel like this.
  5. F1tommy

    F1tommy F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 15, 2007
    7,391
    Chicago USA
    Full Name:
    Tom Tanner
    "energy88, post: 146670279, member: 113809"]
    Ferrari has it’s “special projects” department but I kinda think I’d go to Ken Okuyama, a handsome former professor at the Art Center College of Design, to order my custom Ferrari because he’s been there and done that for Ferrari, while he was at Pininfarina…"



    It looks a lot like the " powerful MACH 5 " from the front as did the Ferrari showcar. :)
     
  6. Isobel

    Isobel F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Jun 30, 2007
    8,755
    On a Wave's Chicane
    Full Name:
    Is, Izzy for Australians
    jm2 likes this.
  7. Isobel

    Isobel F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Jun 30, 2007
    8,755
    On a Wave's Chicane
    Full Name:
    Is, Izzy for Australians
    #8507 Isobel, Jun 20, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
    Pontiac were perpetually offering quite stylish variations but all of them seemed to DNF. The Holden would have been a welcome addition had Pontiac continued although sales may have been challenging.
    Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
    of2worlds, energy88 and jm2 like this.
  8. Isobel

    Isobel F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Jun 30, 2007
    8,755
    On a Wave's Chicane
    Full Name:
    Is, Izzy for Australians
    G. Pepper, of2worlds and jm2 like this.
  9. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Chevy with a Pontiac front clip.
     
    of2worlds likes this.
  10. Isobel

    Isobel F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Jun 30, 2007
    8,755
    On a Wave's Chicane
    Full Name:
    Is, Izzy for Australians
    I guess all of them were in effect. This was a factory job and it was a shame they didn’t allow an additional divisional offering to steal from Ranchero sales. Somehow tighter than the Chevelle, and could have had the performance Great Truck Option...lol.
     
    of2worlds and jm2 like this.
  11. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    GTO.......Garbage Truck Option? ;)
     
    Isobel and Texas Forever like this.
  12. Igor Ound

    Igor Ound F1 Veteran

    Sep 30, 2012
    6,869
    The Horn
    Full Name:
    Igor Ound
    Battista front slightly updated
     

    Attached Files:

    VigorousZX, colombo2cam and crinoid like this.
  13. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Smiles, ModernLou, G. Pepper and 4 others like this.
  14. Jeff Kennedy

    Jeff Kennedy F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    Oct 16, 2007
    4,787
    Edwardsville, IL
    Full Name:
    Jeff Kennedy
    And his straight lines are not straight nor are his "flat" surfaces flat.
     
    jm2 likes this.
  15. technom3

    technom3 F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Mar 29, 2007
    3,686
    Phoenix AZ
    Full Name:
    Justin
    Dont.
    They are doing quite the shuffle and trying to steer away from the wall.

    Many don't even know the wall is coming... some are content in trying to bash through it.

    Ford is taking many steps... which includes some misteps into making sure they survive the coming wall.

    From my inside info... they seem to be the most dynamic.
     
    jm2 likes this.
  16. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    I sure hope you're right!
     
  17. Jeff Kennedy

    Jeff Kennedy F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    Oct 16, 2007
    4,787
    Edwardsville, IL
    Full Name:
    Jeff Kennedy
    Peter DeL has a take on the top leadership of Ford that is rather unkind:

    ditor-in-Chief's Note: Now that Phoebe Wall Howard has unleashed a multi-1000 word "think" piece on the carefully reconstructed brilliance of Jim Farley - it was so embarrassingly gushing that even Ford PR Chief Mark Truby must be blushing and staring at his shoes - the canonization of Farley has well and truly begun. (First we had to put up with "St. Elon" Musk; now we're burdened with "St. Jim" Farley. Pathetic.) I'm not going to go into it beyond saying that, after reading it, the uninformed might think that Farley walks on water, possesses the riveting intellect that occupies a space in the stratosphere beyond mere mortals, has never put a wheel wrong in his entire career, and is now solidly in the discussion to replace Jim Hackett when "Professor Moon Beam" wanders off into the sunset. This was a setup piece designed to portray a wonderfully benign Farley, an executive whose rise has no perceptible limit, and whose enduring warmth is something that people crave to bask in. This latest "humanization" campaign of Farley is pretty much unmitigated ********* - aided and abetted by Wall Howard - and it has nothing to do with the "real" Jim Farley, the one hordes of people at Ford have grown to loathe with a seething level of disgust that is palpable. You want to know the real Jim Farley? This is what I had to say about him in May of 2018 in "Ford in Free Fall" (below). -PMD

    But another situation is roiling Bill Ford’s decision making at this very moment, and it involves the rise of another executive, one who is unfettered by rational thought and untethered by accountability, and who has gone completely off the rails. Jim Farley, the former Toyota wunderkind who was responsible for the launch of the Scion brand, was brought in by Alan Mulally to be Chief Marketing Officer way back when. And not unexpectedly, his debut at Ford didn’t exactly get off to an auspicious start. Farley didn’t waste any time transforming himself into an enfant terrible right out of the gate. Displaying a prodigiously short attention span and burdened by an excruciatingly painful interpersonal awkwardness, Farley’s belligerent, condescending style of dealing with underlings, along with his classic “parachute in, helicopter out” M.O. that has defined bad actor executives for decades in this business, became his calling card. Internally, Farley became known as "The Two Jims," and interactions with him became a crap shoot, hinging upon whether people encountered the "good" Jim or the "bad" Jim on that particular day. Needless to say when the "bad" Jim was unleashed, Farley left a trail of bad feelings and highly questionable decisions in his wake.

    Farley has long considered himself to be “the smartest guy in the room” at Ford, much to everyone’s endless chagrin, because the reality is that he isn’t. It’s a carefully crafted façade that is hollow to its core. Farley’s bad executive behavior starts with his inability to listen, considering his own counsel to be by far the best source when it comes to decision making. (Ironically this is the absolute opposite of Alan Mulally, who regularly canvassed multiple constituencies on major decisions.) And because of that, as well as a host of other annoyances, Farley left such a bitter taste in people’s mouths that when he was shipped off to run Ford of Europe several years ago the overwhelming sense of relief internally at Ford was palpable.

    Blissfully unaware that he was universally loathed back in Dearborn, Farley seized upon his assignment in Europe, seeing it as a stepping stone to the executive suite at Ford. And the planets were aligned for him to come off as a hero there, too, because the European market had been in the doldrums for so long that the only way it could go was up. Steve Odell, who had been running Ford of Europe and had done all of the heavy lifting by closing plants and laying off people, set the table for Farley to succeed. And the inevitable happened, as Ford’s fortunes recovered in Europe along with the overall market. Farley took advantage of the opportunity and made sure all of the execs back in Dearborn could see what a genius he was, and unfortunately, too many fell for it.

    The problem with all of this was that once Mark Fields was jettisoned from the company, not only did Bill Ford bring in Hackett, he brought Farley back from Europe, and made Joe Hinrichs and Farley co-No. 2 executives reporting to Hackett. And it proved to be a fateful decision, because at that very moment Farley decided that he was very much going to be The Guy.

    As I said previously, an emboldened Farley, unfettered and untethered, turned out – predictably – to be disastrous. With his eyes set firmly on Hackett’s job, the very worst of Farley returned to Ford headquarters, only now his most repugnant qualities were magnified and amplified, with no one seemingly able to rein him in.

    Besides his now-signature belligerence and rudeness in full view, Farley started to get out ahead of his skis, making decisions that were puzzling at best and potentially harmful to the long-term health of the company. Having been gunning for Ford’s advertising agency – the WPP-owned GTB – for years for slights both real and imagined, Farley almost immediately put the massive Ford account up for review. This, after WPP/GTB had been involved with Ford for 73 years. Could the advertising be improved? Certainly. And there's a way to do that. But destroying a long, fruitful relationship to assuage Farley’s gargantuan ego was flat-out irresponsible and uncalled for.

    Farley also commandeered company appearances in front of financial analysts, something completely beyond his ken, thinking that if he demonstrated his acumen there that he would gain favor with Bill Ford and the board. And true to form, this proved to be a total disaster as well. Industry analysts are still talking about Farley’s cringe-worthy performance at the Deutsche Bank Global Auto Industry Conference here in Detroit back in January, where he came off as being someone who was flippant, woefully ill-prepared and not ready for prime time, and consequently Ford came off poorly too. Do you wonder why Ford can’t gain any traction on Wall Street? Farley’s dismal performance that night didn't do the company any favors.

    And then there was the “we’re going to get out of the car business” decision that turned out to be an unmitigated PR disaster, because it was handled poorly and came off as a knee-jerk pronouncement that hadn’t been thought through. It turns out that the idea was Farley’s (no big surprise), wittingly or unwittingly aided and abetted by CFO Bob Shanks. And internally it bore the signature of a classic Machiavellian move by Farley as well, because Joe Hinrichs wasn’t even aware that it was going down until after the fact, which is almost beyond comprehension. (Editor-in-Chief's Note: I spoke with Mark Truby, Ford's PR Chief, and he said that Joe Hinrichs was aware of the car decision. I stand corrected. -PMD)

    Am I picking on Farley? Hardly. I have only scratched the surface in describing this egomaniacal character and his blatant power grab, and the sad thing is that there are several other areas he is seeing fit to mess with inside of Ford that could wreak havoc on the company’s future for years. And this simply shouldn’t be, of course. One bad actor shouldn’t be causing this much consternation and hand-wringing throughout the enterprise, threatening to jeopardize everything the Ford Motor Company stands for. When everything is factored in, Jim Farley is simply the wrong person, in the wrong place, at the wrong time.

    Bill Ford has a very difficult task facing him. He has to admit publicly (after first admitting it to himself) that Jim Hackett isn’t The Guy. Then he has to make sure that Jim Farley is kept as far away from being The Guy as is humanly possible, because left unimpeded Farley will be detrimental to the future of his family's company.

    I closed last week’s column with the following words, which still resonate loud and clear today:

    “In the meantime, since its future product announcement didn’t exactly set the world afire, the Ford executive team needs to press the reset button and focus on the task at hand. That means focusing on designing, engineering and building the best products they can muster for every segment the company competes in, despite the Wall Street cloud of negativity hanging over them.

    Because in the end, there is one fundamental aspect of this business that will never change, and that is that it’s about the product, it has always been about the product, and it always will be about the product.”
     
    jm2 likes this.
  18. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Acura Design Chief, Dave Marek:
    EXTENDED FAMILY: FROM ARTCENTER TO ACURA, DAVE MAREK BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER
    When Acura Executive Creative Director Dave Marek (BS 1987 Transportation Design) walks into a room—tall, laughing and with a pointy strip of white hair on his head—he radiates an infectious energy like Gene Wilder in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

    And when that room is the 49,500-square-foot Acura Design Studio at Honda R&D Americas’ campus in Torrance, California—about 20 miles southeast of Los Angeles—Marek is Willy Wonka himself. It’s here that the alumnus and longtime Transportation Design adjunct professor heads a team of designers for Acura, the American performance and luxury brand of Japanese automaker Honda, where Marek started as an exterior designer 32 years ago, just after graduating from ArtCenter. But rather than making Everlasting Gobstoppers or chocolate rivers, Marek and his team of designers are busy creating the future of Acura—a future that revolves around utilizing the five senses to lead to a more joyful vehicle experience.

    WE’RE ALL IN IT TOGETHER. I WANT EVERYBODY TO SUCCEED.

    Dave MarekAcura Executive Creative Director
    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Acura Executive Creative Director Dave Marek talking to journalists during a 2019 press tour of the Acura Design Studio in Torrance, California, photo courtesy of Acura.
    On this day in early 2019, following an introduction by alumnus and Acura Vice President and Brand Officer Jon Ikeda (BS 89 Transportation), Marek strolls into the studio and stands in front of a whiteboard, facing a group of journalists. This is the first time in 12 years, since the space opened in 2007, that the company has invited media inside the studio. Its sky-high white and glass walls contain a treasure trove of design concepts, models and high-tech visions. “Every walk of design you can think of originates here, and ArtCenter is where most of our designers come from,” he tells the journalists.

    Marek—wearing a burgundy velvet blazer, two-toned shoes and clear-framed square glasses—has a bunny named Waterlily, loves rock ‘n’ roll and is friends with ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons. He co-hosts the freewheeling travel podcast Man Seeks Adventure with automotive entrepreneur Brad Fanshaw and television personality Heather Storm. He gets three and a half hours of sleep a night (his mind spins with ideas) and he’s in Tokyo twice a month for work. He also designs art and graphics for championship racing teams, including Honda Racing, and has created vibrant, swooping “paintscapes” on race cars for 45 years.


    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    ArtCenter alumnus and Acura Lead Interior Designer Simon Yu working at the Acura Design Studio in 2019, photo courtesy of Acura.
    His team—which Marek calls “a family”—includes his former Transportation Design students Simon Yu (BS 98), Acura’s lead interior designer who was born in South Korea, raised in California, and has been with the company for more than 17 years; and Randall Smock (BS 01), Acura’s lead exterior designer, who has worked at Acura for more than 18 years and teaches ArtCenter at Night courses. His friend and former student Michelle Christensen (BS 05), Acura’s former lead principal designer, was the lead exterior designer of the brand’s powerful second-generation NSX supercar. Marek and Ikeda themselves first met as fellow students at ArtCenter three decades ago. Ikeda started working at Acura after graduating from ArtCenter—two years after Marek.

    Turning towards the studio’s whiteboard, Marek pulls out a black pen and begins drawing Acura’s arrow-shaped logo and bumper. He adds and erases elements, making the wheels taller, the grille higher, until he’s sketched the brand’s 2019 RDX midsize luxury crossover SUV. Marek has sketched like this for decades, setting the tone of Acura’s range of vehicles, and especially putting his stamp on the brand’s Precision Crafted Performance DNA in the designs of the next-generation NSX and 2019 RDX. “See, touch and experience,” he says about the Japanese principle of sangen shugi, in which employees participate in the production process in person and base decisions on reality versus theory. “That’s the Honda way.”


    " style="cursor: pointer; background-color: rgb(44, 44, 44); border-top-left-radius: 50%; border-top-right-radius: 50%; border-bottom-right-radius: 50%; border-bottom-left-radius: 50%; box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); display: inline-block; font-size: 12px; height: 40px; padding: 12px 2px 0px 4px; position: relative; text-align: center; transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out; width: 40px; z-index: 2; margin-right: 20px;"> 1 of 10
    Acura Executive Creative Director Dave Marek showing journalists the Acura Precision Concept during a 2019 press tour of...
    Read More

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Acura senior clay modeler Matthew Mantz with a model of the RDX at the Acura Design Studio in 2019, photo courtesy of Acura.
    Marek then leads the journalists on a sweeping tour of the two-story studio, passing his toy car-covered desk upstairs, and winding through a nearby room designed for what the late Honda co-founder Takeo Fujisawa coined waigaya: impromptu meetings in which problems are tackled. Back downstairs, as reporters mill around the studio, Marek hunkers down inside the gleaming low-slung Precision Concept, which boasts 22-inch wheels and tires. There, in the car’s sleek cocoon of quiet, he becomes introspective and personal. “I’m adopted,” says Marek, intently. “And I’m searching, maybe not consciously, for inclusion because of that. My personality outside of work and school is the same. I like to bring people in.”

    Born and raised in Sacramento, Marek grew up drawing all the time, especially cars. “I was car crazy,” he says, grinning. His late father worked as an engineer in printing, and his late mother was a housewife, attended the University of California, Berkeley, and was an active member of the League of Women Voters. “My mom was a force of nature and the smartest person I’ve ever known.” Marek went to California State University, Sacramento and had his sights set on becoming a senator. He worked for the California State Legislature printing bills overnight.

    Yet despite his political ambitions, he still found himself particularly obsessed with racecars, including the 1969 Porshe 917, and a visit to ArtCenter in 1984 literally changed his life. “There were tears,” Marek says of his first trip to the College’s Hillside Campus. “I saw the Student Gallery, and I said to myself, ‘What the hell? This is not real.’”

    He submitted his portfolio within four days, and was accepted into the College. At ArtCenter, he was influenced by his Transportation Design alumni instructors, including now Transportation Design Chair Stewart Reed (BS 69), Graduate Industrial Design Chair Andy Ogden (BS 83), Lloyd Walker (BS 84) and Doug Halbert (BS 78). Walker, Ogden and Halbert all worked at the time at Honda R&D, and Halbert hired Marek.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    ArtCenter alumnus and Acura Lead Exterior Designer Randall Smock showing a white full-scale model of the 2019 RDX during a 2019 press tour of the Acura Design Studio in Torrance, California, photo courtesy of Acura.
    When Marek started at Acura, he remembers thinking, “I’m home.”

    The first cars Marek worked on were the 1990 Honda Accord and the first-generation NSX. Still seated in the Precision Concept, he laughs when recalling one of his early contributions to the NSX design. Shortly after starting his new job, Marek was asked to go to Acura’s studio in Japan. While there, he heard his name being broadcast loudly over the intercom. “I go to where the designers are, and there’s a clay model of an NSX seat,” says Marek. “They say, ‘Please sit.’ I sit, and they start measuring. They modeled it around me since there were no other Americans there. I’m proud of that. I’m proud of my rear.”

    Marek does indeed spend a lot of time sitting on his rear for his job and his podcast. From traveling to Detroit, Las Vegas, Arizona and beyond for Man Seeks Adventure to his trips to Tokyo for work, he’s racked up more than 2 million airline miles. When home, his routine entails driving 26 miles from his house in Glendale to the Acura Design Studio in Torrance, getting to work around 6:30 a.m. (he uses that early alone time to walk around and study the vehicles). His commute also presents him with an occasional surprise: Once, while stuck in traffic, he spotted presidential candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders in the vehicle next to him.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Acura's family of 2019 A-Spec models, including the TLX, MDX and RDX, plus the second-generation NSX (in front), photo courtesy of Acura.
    His earlier “butt model” story also leads him to a much more serious note about the importance of diversity within transportation design. “I design thinking of the melting pot of people I’ve known my whole life: different cultures, genders and LGBT,” says Marek. “I’ve seen the industry shift and change over the years.”

    Marek is proud of his team’s accomplishments as well as his own, including managing the design team of the 2003 Honda Element and 2006 Honda Ridgeline, and the design of the first Acura model to be designed, developed and produced in America: the 1997 Acura CL. He opened Honda’s R&D’s Advanced Design Studio in Pasadena in 2006 and then opened its 6,500-square-foot replacement in downtown in L.A., focused on future designers.

    “The cliché is, ‘Do something you love and you’ll never work a day in your life,’” Marek says, thinking about his career. “The non-cliché is that I was going to do this anyway. If I had become a senator, I’d probably be grilling somebody while I was sketching a car. I love what I do, and I still kind of think it’s not real.”

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Gypsy Modina, Acura color and materials principal designer, and Acura designer Violet Park showing objects of inspiration for the RDX's color and materials scheme during a 2019 press tour of the Acura Design Studio, photo courtesy of Acura.
    Since 1992, Marek has also taught at ArtCenter—first, after graduating, he taught ArtCenter at Night courses and then, later, Transportation Design degree courses such as the portfolio-building Viscom Fundamentals 7. He views his role as a professor similar to his position at Acura—one of fostering collaboration. “We’re all in it together,” he says. “I want everybody to succeed.”


    In the studio, his team demonstrates that collaborative spirit. Smock points to a white full-scale model of the 2019 RDX, whose exterior design he led, and traces its black “dance of lines” stemming from the car’s front logo. Yu shows off the vehicle’s spacious interior, featuring red leather-covered seats and olive ash wood trim, which he describes as “a futuristic vision of a penthouse in the clouds.” Gypsy Modina, color and materials principal designer, and designer Violet Park showcase a table with objects—including metallic baseballs—that inspired the vehicle’s color and materials scheme. Matthew Mantz, a senior clay modeler, displays a quarter-scale model of the car while Shaun Westbrook, a designer and principal lead, presents a look at Acura’s HMI (Human Machine Interface) and its semi-autonomous Precision Cockpit.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login
    Acura Vice President and Brand Officer Jon Ikeda and Acura Executive Creative Director Dave Marek, both ArtCenter alumni, revealing the Acura Precision Cockpit at the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show, photo courtesy of Acura.
    Wrapping up the presentations, Marek shows a video imagining an autonomous concept car—inspired equally by racecars and the writing of Jules Verne—with a nanocrystal outer skin, AI-powered sensors and an immersive VR cabin.

    “We’re always aiming at what the future is,” Marek says, “and how we will get there.”
     
    of2worlds and Qvb like this.
  19. Texas Forever

    Texas Forever Three Time F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed

    Apr 28, 2003
    38,949
    Texas!
    For once, I'd like to see a designer wear white.
     
    jm2 likes this.
  20. ingegnere

    ingegnere Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 12, 2004
    2,083
    Montreal
  21. ingegnere

    ingegnere Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 12, 2004
    2,083
    Montreal
    Other line attributed to him upon seeing the TR7 for the first time at the 1975 Geneva motor show, he paused and stared at it, then walked around the other side and gasped, exclaiming: "Oh my God! They've done it to the other side as well."
     
    of2worlds, Texas Forever and jm2 like this.
  22. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    A week ago, I was judging at the Eyes on Design Concours here in Detroit. The class I was a judge in was 'Sports Cars of the '70's'. One of the cars in that class was a TR7. I had recalled the Giugiaro quote about the design of the TR7 and passed it along to my fellow judges. They couldn't stop laughing. They had never heard that story.

    Somehow, I failed to get a photo of the TR7. :eek:

    The 18 yr old son of one of the judges was telling us how much he liked the TR7. I guess us old guys just never 'got it'. Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
    ingegnere likes this.
  23. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,741
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Mr. Marek has a red jacket in one photo and a grey in another.
    Having said that, my standard uniform is black............but without a scarf.
     
    of2worlds likes this.
  24. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    9,457
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    Texas Forever and jm2 like this.
  25. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    9,457
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    jm2 likes this.

Share This Page