News

car design thread

Discussion in 'Creative Arts' started by jm2, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    jm2 likes this.
  2. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    • Flymove and AKKA Technologies announce a new agreement for the brand “Bertone”. The agreement allows the English company Flymove to use the Bertone brand for all products and services in all countries of the world where the brand is registered, except for the residual rights of licenses previously granted to third parties, which will expire definitively by the end of 2020. Flymove has already planned and started a series of important investments for the relaunch of the brand, which include the opening of the Bertone Style Centre in Milan and the launch of the new EV City Cars and Hyper Cars series, which will be officially presented at 2020 Geneva Motor Show.

      The designer Carlos Arroyo Turon will lead a staff of designers chosen among the best talents in the world and a team of Italian companies of absolute excellence in automotive design. Bertone is one of the most famous automotive design brands, founded in 1912 and which under the guidance of Nuccio Bertone has seen a succession of some of the greatest designers in the world, including Marcello Gandini and Giorgetto Giugiaro, who have created some of the most beautiful cars in the history of the automobile, such as the Lamborghini Miura and Countach, the Lancia Stratos, the Alfa Romeo Giulietta and many others.
     
  3. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Whoa
    "Styling isn't going to be the motivation for these vehicles" :eek:
     
  4. Tcar

    Tcar F1 Rookie

    Hmmm, the rear wheel skirts on the L & R side seem to have totally different profiles...
     
  5. 330 4HL

    330 4HL Formula Junior
    Silver Subscribed

    May 12, 2005
    798
    Vancouver
    Full Name:
    Rick Bradner
    hey John, wrong "reply" and I don't want to be associated with that quote! :eek:
     
    jm2 likes this.
  6. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    Texas Forever likes this.
  7. Texas Forever

    Texas Forever Three Time F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed

    Apr 28, 2003
    38,914
    Texas!
    The ironic thing is most of the buyers were Boomers.
     
  8. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    Yes. One of the most compelling "features" was that you could hose it out when the interior got dirty! :)

     
  9. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
  10. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john


    https://macsmotorcitygarage.com/video-inside-the-ford-design-studios-1964/?fbclid=IwAR3YbwfSVF-hpj6tAydRmAMqcN3GHIrxb2nIhM_8LNLrNS6FeeV1DmQCtLs



    The styling studios of the global automakers are among the most secretive and secure places on earth—-except for those occasional moments when, for reasons of their own, they decide to allow us a brief glimpse inside. One such moment at the Ford Motor Company arrived in 1964, when the Dearborn carmaker produced this film, Styling and the Experimental Car.

    The early ’60s, we have to believe, were an exciting time at the Ford design studios, tucked away behind the black iron gates on Oakwood Avenue. Gene Bordinat, who in 1961 succeeded George Walker as vice-president of design, headed a talented team of stylists that included Joe Oros, L. David Ash, John Najjar, and others. And the advanced projects under way at the time included the Ford Allegro (above), the Shelby Cobra-based Cougar II, and the Aurora, a futuristic station wagon concept (read our feature on the Aurora here). Naturally, they are all featured here.

    For the purposes of this film, the culmination of all the effort was the fabulous Ford Mustang, introduced in April of 1964 at the New York World’s Fair. And of course, it’s fair to say the Mustang was easily one of the most important and memorable designs ever created in the Ford styling studios. Here’s some of the story behind it.
     
    anunakki likes this.
  11. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    anunakki and jm2 like this.
  12. F1tommy

    F1tommy F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 15, 2007
    7,320
    Chicago USA
    Full Name:
    Tom Tanner

    The vibration going over bumps and road surfaces makes this a bad idea for reliability. Those wheel mounted motors would take a beating and be exposed to the elements more than internal motors. Not sure what the advantage would be, certainly not weight. Plus if one motor went bad it would pull to one side. Dumb other than on high mtx hybrid supercars and racecars.
     
    energy88 likes this.
  13. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
    Some good real-world points.
     
  14. Veedub00

    Veedub00 F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    Jun 30, 2006
    3,426
    Troy, Michigan
    Full Name:
    James
    I don't agree with your reliability assessment at all. There's like a few pieces to these motors. As long as there is no unwanted relative motion between them, vibration is not an issue. Elements are not an issue either. Does water get through your bead your tire makes with your wheel? Does water get into your brake caliper pistons?
     
  15. 330 4HL

    330 4HL Formula Junior
    Silver Subscribed

    May 12, 2005
    798
    Vancouver
    Full Name:
    Rick Bradner
    I completely agree with F1Tommy. Regardless of what the claims are, it will be subject to greater impact stresses and it will increase unsprung weight; to claim otherwise is absurd. Meanwhile, the dampers are going to have to be oversize (at least) to handle the extra weight or super high tech ($$).

    What are the advantage to this setup?
    You could mount the same motors 24" away from the wheels with a shaft and save all the hassle.
     
    of2worlds likes this.
  16. JCR

    JCR F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Mar 14, 2005
    5,920
    H-Town, Tejas
  17. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    of2worlds likes this.
  18. Qvb

    Qvb Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Nov 9, 2003
    1,863
    Newport Beach Ca.
    Full Name:
    John Dixon
    jm2 likes this.
  19. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    https://www.cardesignnews.com/insights/design-essay-are-responsible-cars-the-future/38722.article?fbclid=IwAR0B39U1ydxY_k8CEi1oYCq_llUopKf2I1pShmjyyTC8Ibi0jW3lso4Wiyk

    INSIGHTS
    Design Essay: Are ‘Responsible’ Cars the Future?
    By Aidan Walsh17 July 2019
    • As we’re all undoubtedly aware, environmental concerns are an omnipresent topic of discussion in automotive circles today. From Dieselgate and Clean Air Zones to carbon-based taxation and the much-vaunted rise of the EV, when we talk about cars, we invariably talk about green issues too.

    What is striking nonetheless, is that these discussions are often rather one-dimensional in nature, being focused almost entirely on tailpipe emissions, as opposed to taking a more holistic view of a vehicle’s environmental and social impact.

    For, while the private car has long been typecast as an environmental villain, today’s mainstream green debates are far more wide-reaching, with everything from cheap flights and bargain-priced clothing to beef steaks being analysed and assessed in terms of eco credentials and social cost.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Cars with emphasised exhausts won’t be acceptable for much longer…

    Thus, it does seem almost inevitable that tomorrow’s automobiles will be judged on a far broader range of criteria than the content of their exhaust fumes (or lack thereof). Rather than simply fitting an Adblue system (or ‘defeat device’) to ace that emissions test, the cars of the near future will probably need to become all-round ‘responsible’ products in both an environmental and ethical sense, a requirement likely to affect every stage of the design process.

    How so? Well, one obvious trend today is the growing movement against meat and other animal products, particularly those requiring the slaughter of the animal in question. It’s not difficult to foresee a time when speccing a real leather interior in a new car is about as socially acceptable as chain-smoking on a hospital ward, meaning the need to find a real, credible alternative seems quite pressing.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    1/3

    SHOW CAPTION
    We’ve had synthetic leather (i.e. Mercedes-Benz Artico/MB Tex) for many years of course. Furthermore, there are now an array of ‘vegan’ leather alternatives emanating from sources as unlikely as coffee and paper – the latter prompting Tesla’s promise that its upcoming Model Y will be “fully vegan”. A commendable goal, although as with blanked-off ‘grilles’ on EVs, it’s hard not to see such ‘imitation’ materials as somewhat backward-looking, even dishonest.

    Far more convincing are the wool-based interiors on offer in Toyota’s Japanese market Century limousine, and latterly in Land Rover’s Velar and Evoque models. Although obviously still animal-based, their production doesn’t require bloodshed. What’s more, wool-based materials offer significant advantages over leather, such as better temperature regulation, and are simply more appealing for not pretending to be what they’re not.

    Still, leather is only the start. The drive to eliminate ‘single use’ plastic products, such as drinking straws, bottles and other packaging has made headline news recently, with events such as the UK’s Glastonbury music festival going plastic-free to much fanfare. Additionally, we also appear to be witnessing the beginnings of a backlash against so called ‘fast fashion’ – ultra-low-priced clothing produced under exploitative conditions and purposefully designed for a short shelf life.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Tesla-powered Beetle, seen at Fully Charged Live. Greener overall than an e-Golf?

    Thankfully, the motor industry isn’t known for unethical labour practices, nor is it pushing anything resembling a ‘disposable’ car (perish the thought). Still, the issue of product longevity barely registers on the automotive radar, despite research suggesting the ecological cost of manufacturing a new car can often outweigh improvements in tailpipe emissions versus long-lived older models.

    Whilst in-demand clothing brand Patagonia (see gallery below) has pitched itself as the antidote to ‘fast fashion’, emphasising the longevity of its products and actively discouraging customers from disposing of serviceable older garments, car manufacturers and governments have instead pushed wasteful scrappage schemes in the name of planetary responsibility.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    1/10


    Clearly, extending the lifecycle of individual products seems counterintuitive in commercial terms (although Patagonia certainly hasn’t suffered), but if trends in other sectors are any indicator, this issue may, in time, become unavoidable for car manufacturers and designers.

    The inherent mechanical simplicity of EVs versus traditional ICE vehicles would appear conducive to a longer usable life, additionally Fiat’s excellent Centoventi concept demonstrated the potential for a car which could be endlessly customised, modernised and upgraded over the course of its life, helping it keep up with the times.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    FIAT Centoventi concept, with its clip-on extremities, can be refreshed at any time

    It may seem a crazy idea today, but perhaps one day we’ll think of cars a little more like we do architecture today. Most people are quite happy to live or work in an older building, so long as it has modern conveniences within. We wouldn’t bulldoze our houses because the decor was outdated, or the roof leaking; we’d revamp and repair instead. Maybe tomorrow’s car manufacturers might be just as eager to sell us a software upgrade or else a new, modular, infotainment system or trim package for our old car as they would a whole new vehicle. It’s an interesting thought…

    But if that seems radical, then furthering the use of recycled and sustainable materials must be something of a no-brainer for any firm serious about planetary responsibility. Recyclability targets for end-of-life vehicles are nothing new, of course, and recycled materials have been appearing in cars for quite some time now, albeit mostly in unseen areas such as seat padding and sound deadening.

    Image Unavailable, Please Login

    BMW i3 interior

    Unfortunately, few seem to have followed BMW’s example in allowing such materials to take centre stage their products. Far from cheapening or detracting from the ambience of BMW’s i3, the car’s kenaf (rather than plastic) and eucalyptus wood interior panels help create a truly unique character and charm – in addition to easing the conscience of owners.

    Going further still, might more long-lived, customisable vehicles lend themselves more to the use of reclaimed or upcycled materials and components? Want to make your luxury car stand out from the crowd, how about custom interior trim crafted from reclaimed wood, or seats fashioned from re-used clothing or home upholstery fabrics? With the lounge-esque autonomous concepts, along with upcycled clothing and furniture, being all the rage right now, why not?

    But while we can only speculate on exactly how future trends will play out, it’s quite clear that the issues of environmental and social responsibility will only increase in importance over the coming years, with designers playing a key role in ringing change.

    We’ve become so accustomed to seeing the car industry take a beating over tailpipe emissions – only to be forced into action by legislation – it’d be incredibly refreshing to see car firms take the lead regarding other environmental and moral issues. What’s more, such a move might just help the car industry to win back favour with the kind of educated millennial buyers flocking to brands like Patagonia and even begin to throw off its planet-killing image.

    Are responsible cars the future? Let’s hope so!



    Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
    of2worlds likes this.
  20. F1tommy

    F1tommy F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 15, 2007
    7,320
    Chicago USA
    Full Name:
    Tom Tanner
    Interesting article. This will still take 5 years for the Italian's to do. And they have been doing "refreshed at anytime" for years. Just look at the Maserati GranTurismo going on 14 years now of refreshing:)

    "FIAT Centoventi concept, with its clip-on extremities, can be refreshed at any time"
     
  21. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    G. Pepper likes this.
  22. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Ian Callum's new job is to make cars beautiful again
    Former Aston and Jag designer starts up a new career - his own design business

    [​IMG]
    Jason Barlow
    17 Jul 2019


    Full screen
    Read more on:
    Anyone who knows Ian Callum will also know that his exit from Jaguar last month – Jexit? – after almost two decades steering its design wasn’t the end, more a new beginning. “Liberating, that’s how it feels,” he says as his new design and engineering business CALLUM (upper case) is unveiled. “I’ve been very fortunate, don’t get me wrong, but I now have a choice what to do on a daily basis. I’ll be the designer of my own future.”

    That and many other things. Callum, based in a 20,000sq ft facility in Warwickshire, will be channelling its boss’s world-class design smarts into travel, audio, and furniture, as well as automotive. After 40-plus years in the business, it’s time for the man whose contribution to our world earned him a CBE to stretch out in ways that the corporate strictures of Big Auto rarely allow.

    Says Callum, “It’s important to me that I’m creative, that’s the stimulus of life. It was essential that I continue with that, although the unfortunate thing is that my medium is very expensive. But I’m going to have a go at this. I could have taken up painting, but I’m a 3D kind of person, so whatever I do had to have a dynamism and real purpose.”

    Backed by a still-secret investor, Callum will be joined by three others, programme director David Fairbairn, who developed a fearsome reputation both for lateral thinking and an ability to get things done while at Jaguar, engineering director Adam Donfrancesco, who has cars like the Noble M600, Aston Martin GT8 and GT12 and F-Type GT4 to his name, and commercial director Tom Bird, who has worked for PWC, Barclays, and JLR. This is a formidable array of talent.

    “My name’s above the door, but if I want to be successful I need to surround myself with good people,” Callum freely admits. “There are four directors, we all have an equal play to make sure it happens, there’s no hierarchy. You need friends and people you can trust. You can’t do something like this on your own, and it’s not an ego thing. We all go through phases of that, where you have to prove something to yourself, then to other people, and then back to yourself again. I’m getting the acoustic guitar out again and hoping I can still play some good tunes.”

    Callum is also pragmatic enough to know that the creative impulse can’t go totally unfettered. “It’s important to understand the calibration of being creative and actually making it happen,” he admits. But the strong romantic streak and innate appreciation of what makes something beautiful that has always marked out this most fascinating of automotive figures is still going to be given full rein.

    I want to bring some artistry back into it. Beauty is missing, and it’s more difficult to create than creating something that’s different

    “The focus will be on the things we enjoy. My mantra is the ‘journey to destinations’. I don’t want to get into corporate train interiors or kettles. I want to get into things that are born of artistry rather than pure practicality. Because I’ve done all that. This might be contentious, but I also believe that once you’ve designed a car, and all the various components involved as well as navigating all the legislation, you can probably design most things. People talk about someone ‘penning’ a design, and it’s a word I loathe. The real strength in car design is in understanding how to get that notion into reality. It’s a very, very complicated process.”

    It’s also an opportunity for him to rediscover one aspect of contemporary car design that many – Ian included – think has gone AWOL.

    “I’d like us to be in charge of what we’re creating, see it through to the end to the level we want to see it through to. It’s a tall order, I know. Metrics and processes are amazing, but I want to bring some artistry back into it. Beauty is missing, and it’s more difficult to create than creating something that’s different. There’s a lot of stuff out there that’s brutal and different for the sake of it.”

    Though not ready to reveal his plans, TG.com knows what’s coming, and it’s very good news indeed.

    “It will be a car,” Callum confirms. “It’s a nice story, and a story I have the right to tell. It’s also a controlled project, and one we can do without getting too ambitious – although any 3D project on this scale is inherently ambitious. It’s a stepping stone for me. Chassis, powertrain, exterior and interior – we’ll be working on all of it. One day I want to do a whole car, but this is a good place to start.”

    More when we get it.
     
    of2worlds and energy88 like this.
  23. energy88

    energy88 F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2012
    8,710
    Fredericksburg, VA & Sarasota, FL
    Full Name:
    John
  24. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner Lifetime Rossa

    Aug 19, 2002
    11,626
    michigan
    Full Name:
    john
    Very cool!
    Tom is a friend of mine. Super talent.
     

Share This Page