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Daytona tyre pressures

Discussion in 'Vintage (thru 365 GTC4)' started by Longstone Tyres, Dec 17, 2018.

  1. Longstone Tyres

    Longstone Tyres Formula 3
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    Feb 2, 2006
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    Dougal
    Hi

    I got an email today from a customer that wanted to know what tyre pressures to run in his Daytona. I had a little look in my period Michelin fitment guides. However this prompted me to add thiis detail to our Ferrari Daytona web page.

    https://www.longstonetyres.co.uk/classic-car-tyres/ferrari/daytona.html

    please, if you have time, have a look at this page and let me know your thoughts. there isn't a pressure recommendation for cars with the 9" rear rim of course because they fitted 215/70 front and rear as standard. However i have suggested that 2 psi less in the rear for the bigger 225 tyres at high speed. please let me know your thoughts.

    the customer in question had taken advantage of this mega deal https://www.longstonetyres.co.uk/classic-car-tyres/ferrari/daytona/set-of-4-215-70vr15-michelin-xwx.html because he has the standard set up with 215/70VR115 front and rear.

    However we do also have a deal for the larger rear tyres as well now. https://www.longstonetyres.co.uk/classic-car-tyres/ferrari/daytona/set-of-2-off-215-70vr15-michelin-xwx-and-2-off-225-70vr15-michelin-xwx.html
     
  2. turbo-joe

    turbo-joe F1 Veteran
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    romano schwabel
    what you understand under "high speed"? more than 200 km/h, but not only 1 minute. if more then it would be good reduce the pressure 2 psi. otherwise stay original plis-minus 0,1 psi. even I think a "normal" driver will not recognize the difference
     
  3. Wheels1

    Wheels1 Formula 3

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    #3 Wheels1, Dec 17, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
  4. Longstone Tyres

    Longstone Tyres Formula 3
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    Image Unavailable, Please Login Your views about the pressure being too high are interesting.

    the pressures i have are from Michelin fitment guides. A tyre manufacture would er towards suggesting a higher tyre pressure, because it will reflect well on the tyre. in that there is less chance of a tyre failure running at a higher pressure, and longevity is good, and the progressive handling is good. the slight sacrifice is comfort. but from a tyre manufacturers point of view i understand why they would be cautious.

    This american fitment guide i have would lead you to believe that earlier cars fitted 205r15, but through contact on this forum i now known that is not correct. b ut this guide even with 215/70R15 tyres does suggest lower pressures.

    Dunlop say 34 front and 38 rear and for high speed 38 front and 42 rear.

    Please keep the input coming. I would like to get as much data as i can which i will put on the page as i can. it might be the case that we cannot give a definitive answer, but if i can collate some facts coming from different sources then people can make their own choices.

    for instance if i were cruising around LA i would run a different pressure to if i was spanking down the amalfi coast.
     
  5. TTR

    TTR Formula 3
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    #5 TTR, Dec 17, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
    In my limited (300K+ miles & counting) experience driving various types of vintage cars, including several Daytonas, in nearly 4 decades,
    I'd say with most cars, regardless of the make, model, year, etc. factory(?) recommended tire pressures are like any other similar OEM "recommendation", just a base line and, depending not only on tire/wheel sizes, but driving/road conditions or surface type, condition/load (how mny passengers, luggage, etc) of a specific car or occasion, etc...., can/will vary, even from "identical" car-to-car.

    In most cases, I'd say consult your "Owners Manual" and as Romano suggested, most drivers/owners of any car, modern or vintage, are not able to notice a few psi variation under (their) "normal" driving condition.
    Why do you think TP sensors were introduced to & are now common in most modern road cars/trucks. :rolleyes:

    To obtain "optimum" driving experience, even with (vintage) road cars, can require extensive adjusting/changing and learning/testing for various car/road conditions to see what work best for a specific car & its driver.

    P.S. Perhaps somewhat irrelevant, but just yesterday a friend & I did a 135+ mile leisure drive up to local mountains (up to +/- 7500 ft altitude, i.e. above snow level, although thankfully non on the roads) in our pre-war "hot rods" and while his has more modern drive train and chassis features including wider, modern radial tires (versus my skinny bias-plys with "personalized", somewhat unconventional, tire pressures) etc, he's always commenting how there's no way for him to keep up with mine on those steep & tight hillside switchbacks with "recommended" (cornering) speeds often down to 15 or 20 MPH. ;)
     
  6. Wheels1

    Wheels1 Formula 3

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    Grant
  7. Tinbender

    Tinbender Formula Junior
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    From the workshop manual and from one of the owners manuals.
     

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  8. Tinbender

    Tinbender Formula Junior
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    Sorry. I don't know how to post the picture instead of the link to the file. If someone could post these photos it would be great.
    Thanks,
    Terry Phillips
     
  9. Longstone Tyres

    Longstone Tyres Formula 3
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    Dougal
    There is scope for varying pressures, In that they have a standard pressure and a high speed pressure. So anywhere in between to suit you is the answer, but considering the difference between the front and rear will help maintain the balance of the cars handling. I think same pressure left and right is particularly critical.


    Higher pressures will make the tyre last longer and less likely to fail because less movement in the side wall means less heat. However letting the pressure down to the standard pressure on slower roads, which we could assume are less smooth roads, will be kinder to the car.
     

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