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F40 lost to fire - 4/5/2017

Discussion in '288GTO/F40/F50/Enzo/LaFerrari' started by dailyferraridriver, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. Peloton25

    Peloton25 F1 Veteran

    Jan 24, 2004
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    Erik
    Believe it was ZFFGJ34B000074047 - the 6th F40 prototype - later converted to GT spec by Michelotto in 1991 according to the DK Engineering ad the last time it was sold.

    Shame that it had to occur in the middle of their epic journey like that.

    >8^)
    ER
     
  2. PAUL500

    PAUL500 Formula 3

    Jun 23, 2013
    2,049
    Ouch, the F40 does seem to prefer the automotive version of a Viking funeral.

    It had some decent company at the wake though, 288 Evo and a LaF.

    Like Jesus though it will live again no doubt, well at least the chassis number will and possibly the frame.

    Classiche do seem to have the ability to resurrect the dead, even those turned just to ash.

    Just realised this is quite an iconic example, I even built the Totip model version :-(
     
  3. tomgt

    tomgt F1 Veteran
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    Feb 22, 2004
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    Tom Wiggers
  4. Traveller

    Traveller F1 Veteran

    Apr 10, 2009
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    Is this by chance the Tax the Rich Jon Hunt car as the rest of the convoy looks like it could be his?

    Didn't his Miura also burn to a crisp?
     
  5. Bas Jaski

    Bas Jaski Two Time F1 World Champ

    Mar 24, 2008
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    What's an economical (and reversible for the anoraky :rolleyes:) solution? Replace fuel lines with fire resistant items including a valve that'll seal the fuel lines in case a fire is detected is a good start. Implementing a fire suppression system (halon?) in the engine is another, a little hand held one is going to accomplish sweet FA. I'd be tempted to get ATL fire resistant fuel bladders, too.

    It's not just about saving the car but also yourself. Paul Walker would still have been alive if the CGT had a proper fire suppression system (lets leave the coulda woulda shoulda aside here, and not discuss him at all), or at least had a better chance.

    Anyone could have an accident whether it's their fault or not, but the F40 is an old car so more susceptible to fires. If you get knocked out during the accident, even briefly, it could safe your live.
     
  6. Marcel Massini

    Marcel Massini F1 World Champ
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    Mar 2, 2005
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    Believe so.

    Marcel Massini
     
  7. Bas Jaski

    Bas Jaski Two Time F1 World Champ

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    #8 Bas Jaski, Apr 7, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
  8. thepinkumbrella

    thepinkumbrella F1 Veteran

    Feb 26, 2006
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    Different car...this car was in the convoy but is still intact.

    Paul
     
  9. Peloton25

    Peloton25 F1 Veteran

    Jan 24, 2004
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    Yes on both accounts - sad about the Miura too.

    This trip was done to collect their LaFerrari Aperta from the factory. They had done a similar convoy back in 2014 when they collected their LaFerrari.

    Ferrari Collector Takes 288 GTO, F40, F50, Enzo Road Trip To Pick Up New LaFerrari: Video

    >8^)
    ER
     
  10. Red Sled

    Red Sled Formula Junior
    Silver Subscribed

    A major source of F40 fires appears to be leaking oil spraying onto the waste gate and/or exhaust. I have had the misfortune of witnessing such a fire and spread very quickly. The magnesium bell housing, when it eventually went, was truly spectacular and beyond any firefighting.

    I replace the lines every 3 years, and have them checked before any track outing. Still, only so much you can do with an old design.
     
    Mark020 likes this.
  11. merstheman

    merstheman F1 Rookie

    Apr 13, 2007
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    Should've learned from the Miura experience... Too bad...
     
  12. phrogs

    phrogs F1 Veteran
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    Seems like inexpensive preventative maintenance to me.
    Hoses do not last forever thats for sure.
     
  13. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    Correct.

    From my perspective, as an F40 owner and specialist, I'd like to know the cause of the fire.
     
  14. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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  15. Bas Jaski

    Bas Jaski Two Time F1 World Champ

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Thanks.

    Ceramic coating on the exhaust would help I assume (also good for reducing heat soak in any case). Where is the oil leaking from? If it's from a hose, is it a rubber item? Replacing that again with a proper braided one is again a smart idea.

    Magnesium goes up at an incredible rate indeed...
     
  16. Christian.Fr

    Christian.Fr Two Time F1 World Champ

    Jun 9, 2005
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    #79890...be careful, some posts are making heart attacks.
    This model is a historic model for France. Was prepared by Michelotto and makes a record in Nardo track around 368 km/h. Was in represented in IMSA by Pozzi garage.


    Thanks Paul :)
     
  17. NürScud

    NürScud F1 Veteran

    Nov 3, 2012
    6,490
    I believe that because of it's history and only for that, this car would be restorable with the appropreate knowledge and money of course. I've seen cars in worst condition (!) than the specific F40 to get back on the road. I think a USA spec F40 returned to road after a fiery accident couple of years ago..
     
  18. stocky

    stocky Formula Junior
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    #19 stocky, Apr 8, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
  19. stocky

    stocky Formula Junior
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    #20 stocky, Apr 8, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
  20. ross

    ross Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Mar 25, 2002
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    i have become a little paranoid about fire since our own garage fire (started by 930 oil leak onto turbo, and magnesium parts accelerating it).

    my f40 has a fire suppression system already in place for both the passenger and engine compartments. it is engaged by a flip of a switch on the center console. it was installed by the previous owner, and therefore dates from a while ago - i wonder if it still works. how do you test that??

    but, i am thinking i should just swap out the fuel bladder system for the american tanks - and to hell with classiche certification ! these suggestions of airplane fuel lines with cutoff valves is also attractive.

    any thoughts on all this from the greater experts on here?
     
  21. ross

    ross Two Time F1 World Champ
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    as an addendum to that last message....
    on second thought, i dont give a damn about classiche since this car already has the bigger brake kit, the newer turbos, lowered suspension.
     
  22. Red Sled

    Red Sled Formula Junior
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    I am no expert but the following is where I am at on mine:
    1) fuel pump inertia switches
    2) high grade fuel and oil lines (from SRI)
    3) Check lines annually and prior to every track outing. One area of note are the lines to the oil rad at the back left which can spray onto exhaust/catalyst and on non-cat cars without the heat shield, the wastegate..
    4) Fire suppression - painful but I have mine taken out and tested at each service before refilling.
    5) Install fire detection in the engine bay, and auto suppression. I would be reaching for the door cord than the manual fire handle. I have seen situations where the initial fire isn't visible to the driver especially on track in the airflow. The sensor responds to rapid increase in temp.

    Classiche seem accommodating on obvious safety items that are non-structural. Fuel tanks though cross the line.

    I defer to the experts here, but it is not obvious to me that the aerosekur fuel bags manufactured today are any less safe than aluminium tanks. However, I worry about the flimsy glass fibre shells they sit in which may shatter and pierce the bags in an impact.
     
  23. Christian.Fr

    Christian.Fr Two Time F1 World Champ

    Jun 9, 2005
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    Sonebody knows the driver? And does he/are injured in this accident?
     
  24. REALZEUS

    REALZEUS F1 Rookie

    Feb 16, 2011
    4,978
    Bournemouth, UK
    Is it a foam systems, instead of a CO2 one, for it to require refilling?
     

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