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Ferrari 288 GTO wrecked, how many

Discussion in '288GTO/F40/F50/Enzo/LaFerrari' started by tomgt, Nov 8, 2018.

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  1. tomgt

    tomgt F1 Veteran
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    How many were wrecked?
    Do all 272 still exist or not?
    Did Eurospares parted out a 288?
     
  2. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    FWIW this GTO went back to Ferrari SpA and has been fully repaired.
     
  3. tomgt

    tomgt F1 Veteran
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    Ok. Do all 272 still exist?
     
  4. crinoid

    crinoid F1 Veteran
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    The damage doesn’t look too severe. It’s a shame however they can be fixed. It’s also a shame when it’s not the exotic drivers fault.
     
  5. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    I can't really say, I have heard of 1 or 2 that were badly burned, but then I have also heard they were being rebuilt.

    With current values, there is every incentive to rebuild.
     
  6. tomgt

    tomgt F1 Veteran
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    Badly burned needs new car to be manufactured. Chassis, engine and gearbox do not survive when it burns to a crisp.
     
  7. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    Essentially.
     
  8. The Nutsack

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    ...all of which costs less than to manufacture than the value once rebuilt, thereby making it worthwhile. I've never understood how burnt/crashed cars rebuilt by modern day restorers are worth even close to an original example. If all the paint on an original Picasso melted in a fire, would anyone pay for the same canvas repainted/recreated by a modern expert painter? If I buy a vintage ferrari, I don't want one with major the body panels built and formed in 2018 for example.

    so nobody knows how many?
     
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  9. m5shiv

    m5shiv Formula Junior

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    It's kind of weird because a lot of older cars weren't that good to begin with, despite their current values. It's far from a Picasso analogy.
     
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  10. The Nutsack

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    The point is when you pay those prices, you're buying a work of mechanical and visual art. Don't you want it to be created by the original artists and not some modern restoration shop (as talented and skillful as they are)
     
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  11. PAUL500

    PAUL500 Formula 3

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    The Picasso is unique, where as a 288 is a collection of components made in large numbers. You could take 10 288s strip them to a bare chassis and block, mix up all the parts and re assemble all 10, they would all still essentially be the same again and no expert could tell the difference.

    Better to have a phoenix example for people to enjoy than a pile of ashes that no one can appreciate anymore.

    There are a few pics out their of some distressed 288s, Marcel identified the VINs of those cars at the time on fchat.
     
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  12. The Nutsack

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    I'm not saying they should not be rebuilt and enjoyed. Just that to me a rebuilt car is not nearly as valuable as a more original one. I recall that a recent 250 GTO was rebuilt essentially from a bare chassis and still sold for a BIG number. To me, that car is closer to a replica than a real 250 GTO, but just because they started with a (totally destroyed) original chassis it was considered an original car, doesn't make sense to me.
     
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  13. of2worlds

    of2worlds F1 World Champ
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    Years ago Ferrari rebuilt a fire damaged 288 GTO. It was essentially a new GTO that the owner received. That car was assembled by the factory to fix any damage done by the fire.
     
  14. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    It is logistically impossible to know exactly how many have burned worldwide to this very day, save to say that as someone who tracks the cars closely for business reasons, I'm aware of just 3 cars having serious fires, there may be a couple more, either way it's a relatively small number, a handful covers it.

    Given current values, I think all of them will come back, if they haven't begun or completed that process already.

    I think burnt/crashed cars do bring significantly less in the market than cars without that history.

    Some people are okay with a car going back to it's original creator or artisan Ferrari SpA to be reborn, and prefer this over having an independent restorer do the work.
     
  15. willcrook

    willcrook Formula Junior

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    how many new cars could ferrari build if they decided to?
     
  16. tomgt

    tomgt F1 Veteran
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    Ask Ferrari Classiche
     
  17. amenasce

    amenasce Two Time F1 World Champ

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    So would you pay the same $$ for an original 288 in perfect condition than you would for a burnt and rebuilt at Ferrari Spa in 2018? Or less? Or more?
     
  18. The Nutsack

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    I hope the original is worth more, and it certainly would be to me. The 2018 version, even if built by Ferrari, is more like a pur sang Bugatti in my eyes.

    I think it would be really cool for Ferrari to announce a limited run of ~100 brand new 288 GTOs, F40s, or whatever. People could buy those cars and actually drive/enjoy them, although I suspect they would overcharge all the LaF owners, who would stick them in garage as a "modern collectible" rather than enjoy them...
     
  19. joe sackey

    joe sackey Four Time F1 World Champ
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    An original perfect condition GTO is always worth the most.

    Ferrari SpA is simply a good option to save a damaged car.

    Many original GTOs and F40s are regularly & enthusiastically enjoyed.
     
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  20. davemqv

    davemqv F1 Rookie

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    +1. This analogy never makes sense. No matter how hand built, cars are built from diagrams by workmen and fabricators, be it at the factory when new or by a restoration shop 30 years later. Part of the whole point in a production car (no matter how exclusive or limited in number) is that it can be replicated more than once.

    Even a Singer Porsche ...handmade from start to finish, is built to a formula.

    Additionally, cars are meant to be serviced and if needed, repaired. It's inherent in their creation. The lines between new tires, new hoses, new leather, new paint, new manifolds, new engine, and new body panels are arbitrary ones.

    I'd argue this is especially the case when the origin DNA of the car brand is racing. Racing = crashing = new parts/rebuilt cars.

    A painting possesses none of these traits. It is a singular thing that is meant to sit on a wall and be looked at, not used up and worn out, then fixed and put back on the road. However, even if we accept the comparison - conservation is an accepted part of maintaining art for the ages, and yes, that often includes cleaning and "touching up" a painting. As long as the conservators are good at their jobs, you'll never know it happened. I'd say it's fair to apply that same leniency to mechanics and restorers.

    I'd be happy with a properly rebuilt GTO.
     
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  21. Culprit

    Culprit Karting

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    Look up 'the ship of Theseus'. People have been discussing this for 2000 years.
     

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