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For you private pilots ... a question

Discussion in 'AviatorChat.com' started by mikesufka, Jan 25, 2019.

  1. mikesufka

    mikesufka Formula 3
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    Mar 4, 2006
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    Mike Sufka
    So I'm more curious than serious, but lately I've been looking at planes with new interest. I have minimal experience with small planes, although I used to fly with my dad when I was younger ( Cessna 172 and then a Piper Cherokee Arrow ) - it was casual - usually within 100 miles or so from the airport in St. Cloud, MN, looking at lakes, colleges, etc ...

    Anyway, my question is, what's the natural progression of airplanes wanted by a private pilot ? With money taken out of the equation, is there a natural path ?

    I.E.

    Cessna 152 / 172 / 182
    Piper / Mooney / Beachcraft Bonanza / Cirrus
    Piper M series / Pilatus
    A Twin ( Baron ? )
    Jet that can be flown by one pilot ( ? )

    Just curious if anyone wants to give there thoughts ...

    MDS
     
  2. airborne

    airborne Rookie

    Feb 19, 2013
    47
    Northern VA
    It all depends on mission and money.
    It is very natural and common to start training in an entry level Piper, 172, DA40 or SR20. These are economical machines for exploring your real interest and affinity to flying.
    Instrument training can be in these or more complex and powerful aircraft (retracts, turbos, etc)
    After that, it is entirely cost and mission driven.
    With a decade of G1000 birds out there now, the 'progression' norms have changed - from what I see.
    The old norm of progressing through a variety of more complex airframes over a couple thousand hours seems to be waning in favor of quicker advancement into high dollar, high performance aircraft at lower total time hours.
    My last two hangar mates both exemplify this... one went from a T182 to a Citation Mustang. The other went from a 182 to a TBM 930. Both had less than 1000 hours. I sold my DA40 and went to a Meridian then an M600. In all of these cases, the pilot/owner knew what they wanted as a final mission capability and were willing to train and employ mentor pilots.
    I believe the used turboprop market is the game changer. Why would I buy a DA62 for $1M+ when I can get a used G1000 Meridian with a PT6, 6 seats, pressurization and air conditioning for that money?
    In any case, it comes down to money and mission - and what the wife says...
     
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  3. joker57676

    joker57676 Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Apr 12, 2005
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    Because the cost of entry is only a small fraction of the overall cost?
     
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  4. sf_hombre

    sf_hombre Formula Junior
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    We have a winner!
     
  5. mikesufka

    mikesufka Formula 3
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    Mar 4, 2006
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    Airborne -

    M600 ? That is a bad ass looking plane !!! Any pics please ?? Do you do a lot of flying ? Cross country ?

    MDS
     
  6. airborne

    airborne Rookie

    Feb 19, 2013
    47
    Northern VA
    Good answer - but you would be surprised at how close the cost per mile compares between a Meridian and a Mirage.
     
  7. airborne

    airborne Rookie

    Feb 19, 2013
    47
    Northern VA
    The M600 is outstanding for a cross country mission. The new wing - versus the M500 - is a game changer with another 100 gallons of fuel, 1,000 lb load, and 250 Vmo vice 188 on the Meridian. G3000 is impressive, but I was a big fan of the G1000 too. I fly mostly up and down the East coast and out to the islands. Couple trips to CA and Cabo. The extra speed of the TBM would be nice, but acquisition and recurring costs are significantly higher. I would expect Piper to offer up a 300Kt version soon - the engine is loafing along at 600SHP.
     
  8. donv

    donv F1 World Champ
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    Jan 5, 2002
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    Don
    It really depends on what you want to do. I assume you are asking from a transportation point of view, in which case I think it has been pretty thoroughly answered.

    Other people, though, want to do different things. I have a friend with a Cessna 185 that is his dream airplane. He has wheels and amphib floats for it, can go pretty much anywhere, and does. I suppose even he might imagine a Caravan or Kodiak as an upgrade, but my sense is that he rarely wants to take more than his wife and another couple, so the 185 is perfect.

    Someone who decides they are really interested in aerobatics might start with a Citabria or Decathlon, move up to a Pitts, and maybe dream about an Extra.

    And let's not even get into helicopters!
     
  9. jason1st

    jason1st F1 Veteran

    Mar 25, 2004
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    Step 1: Get your PPL. As you progress through ratings you'll start to see the right path for you. The path I took was not what I thought it would be before I started training. Why? Because I didn't know anything.
     
  10. somi talwar

    somi talwar Rookie

    Dec 22, 2018
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    somit talwar
    Agree. I got a Cirrus and did my PPL training in it. Thought that it would lead to a Turbo-prop. Never saw reason to upgrade afterwards. Depends on your missions. The path will be revealed.


    Sent from my iPad using FerrariChat.com mobile app
     
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  11. ersatzS2

    ersatzS2 Formula Junior
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    Jan 24, 2009
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    Princeton, NJ
    'The path will be revealed' I like that. I started training in 172 because that's what was handy, then shifted to DA40 since I wanted G1000. If I knew then what I know now, I would've bought a plane up front. Biggest headache in training for me was logistics of coordinating my schedule with airplane, CFI, weather. When I started my instrument rating I ran into the same thing, so finally bought a Cirrus. Today in fact...
     
  12. jason1st

    jason1st F1 Veteran

    Mar 25, 2004
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    Congratulations on the Cirrus. I did my IFR and Cirrus training at the same time. I always try to kill 2 birds with one stone. If you're gonna train for a new airplane, you might as well be adding a new rating at the same time.
     
  13. somi talwar

    somi talwar Rookie

    Dec 22, 2018
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    somit talwar
  14. CavalloRosso

    CavalloRosso Formula 3

    Jul 12, 2007
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    SVO
    So what ARE you flying now?
     
  15. somi talwar

    somi talwar Rookie

    Dec 22, 2018
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    somit talwar
    No. For a while, could not find time to get out. So gave up the plane.
     

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