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Full color change, Strip the paint: Yes or No?

Discussion in '348/355' started by treedee3d, Jan 11, 2012.

?

Strip the paint for a repaint

  1. Yes, strip it

  2. No, don't strip

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  1. treedee3d

    treedee3d F1 Rookie
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    Apr 1, 2011
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    Montreal
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    Fab
    I am repainting my 355 entirely and changing the color from british racing green to rosso scuderia. I always assumed the green factory paint had to be stripped in order to do a proper job but some Fchatters are telling me to keep the factory paint as a base since it will be cheaper and straighter in the end. Opinions please?

    P.S This should not be a discussion on changing the color, I have made up my mind and I hate the green. Thanks
     
  2. White Knight

    White Knight Formula 3

    Aug 22, 2011
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    Todd S.
    I think the big question is if the quality of the current paint will provide a good base or not. If it's pitted, scratched or flaking anywhere then you might run into issues if you leave it on.

    If the paint seems to be in ok condition, then there's no reason why you can't leave it.
     
  3. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    6,506
    Assuming the paint is in servicible condition, it needs to be sanded down almost to primer anyways.
     
  4. BRADAN

    BRADAN Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Aug 29, 2009
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    West Babylon, NY
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    BRADAN
    You could sand down to primer and spray. We only do bare metal paint jobs because you can't really warranty your finish if you do not know what's under it. It is more expensive but I always recommend doing it once the right way. If you had the car from brand new and know it was never painted that is another story.
     
  5. notoboy

    notoboy F1 Rookie

    Jul 8, 2003
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    David
    I voted to strip the paint, because that is definitely the best way to go, but also the more difficult and more expensive route, but with that you might open up a can of worms: any irregularities in the metal that might have been corrected pre-painting will have to be done again.


    If you choose not to repaint:
    - You will have to sand and prep properly. If not prepped correctly, putting a sticker or 3M on the paint and peeling it off might remove the new paint.
    - You may reveal the old color when the paint is chipped or scratched.
    - You may see rounder edges at the panel edges due to paint buildup.
    - The paint will be more susceptible to chipping and flaking.


    Cheers to deciding on a repaint, because you want to do it, and scr3w the nay sayers. It will feel like a completely new car in another color ;)
     
  6. gus355

    gus355 Formula Junior

    Aug 3, 2011
    569
    B.C. and WA
    I am going to go with posts 2, 3 and 4.

    If your car has the original paint and it is adhering then you are wasting time and money to strip the car, any shop that will just arbitrarily strip a car to paint it is stripping your wallet.


    You should have requested that only those with actual paint and body knowledge should vote here.

    If I were to do it (and I have) I would do any necessary spot repairs ( I saw some surface rust etc. on your car) then long board the car to get the panels straight with 40 then 80 grit, you can primer or fill any low spots (I like metalglaze) Always finish with 80 grit longboard NOT A DA - of course there are small areas that require hand sanding on curves and edges but the 355 has a good area of the qtr./door/fender that need to be straight as well as the hood.

    ***I want to note that if the car is reasonably straight (the panels have no waves when you look down the car) then there will be not much time to longboard the car as the material comes off fast and you will readily see if it is straight quickly***

    Then I would shoot the car with an epoxy primer, the 80 grit finish will give the epoxy a very high bond to the car so that no matter what (within reason - like rock chips) the paint should not chip past this coat so you don't have green showing through the chips, after that you may need a coat or two of hi-build primer and it can be wetsanded.

    This process varies from the "standard" "production line" way of doing things because it will take longer and it requires more attention to details but I promise you the results are going to be way better with not take nearly as long as if you stripped the car.

    If you like, take this post and my post #8 in your mini resto thread and show it to your paint guy - see what he says, if he scoffs at it then you might want to look elsewhere.

    If you are looking for more advice feel free to PM me.
     
  7. treedee3d

    treedee3d F1 Rookie
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    Apr 1, 2011
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    Fab
    Thanks for the advice and thank you for always responding to posts with pertinent information, you've been a great help so far and I thank you sincerely

    I will talk to him tomorrow and see what he says. I'll let you know....
     
  8. notoboy

    notoboy F1 Rookie

    Jul 8, 2003
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    gus355,
    Cheers to putting up some good info ;)


    treedee3d,
    I wish you the best in your quest - I'm sure the car will look awesome when it's all done!
     
  9. treedee3d

    treedee3d F1 Rookie
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    Apr 1, 2011
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    I showed your post and Bradan's post to my painter and he agrees with everything you said and that is what he reccomends also.

    I naively tought that "not stripping" the car was a lazy, cheap and not as good a job as stripping but it turns out it's completely untrue and there is never as good a base as a factory base so I have decided not to strip it. I will save money and it will end up looking nicer in the end based on my understanding.

    I also am going to have a red primer which will show red in case of a paint chip so it will be less visible.
     
  10. sevminasyan

    sevminasyan Formula 3
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    Jun 24, 2008
    1,057
    Glendale, CA
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    Steve
    Might be late on commenting but here's my view if its gonna help. My suggestion, paint it the Rosso Barchetta, the burgundy color.

    If you don't strip the paint, obviously you are saving the hassle of all rubber molding and misc stuff that needs to come off.
    This will give you somewhat of a darker shade red if you have green original paint. This being said, your paint material cost will go up either in white or yellow primer in covering the Green or in the base coat red.
    If I were you, I would ask to go one shade lighter on the undercoat red paint, more towards orange and when you spray the final rosso, the pop of the rosso will be there.
    Here's some advise for your painter. Around the windshield and the door rubber seals, have him or her for that matter buy some 3-5 mm tick rope and insert it under the rubber seals so you dont get paint on the edges.

    1. Removal of door outer window rubber. Remove door panel, loosen up the four window bolts , remove the two allen bolts above the locking mechanism on the door to remove teh window guide, teh triangular shiny aluminium piece, start removing the rubber moulding from the edge by pulling it up first and then on teh outer trim, push the rubber downwards towards the inside of the door then remove it by pulling it up. Obviously you need to remove the mirror.

    2. Remove the bumpers to get a clean paint job and polish them off the car to avoid the sandpaper run off on the inner structure.

    I have painted a whole 355 before and if you need other suggestions or input, dont hesitate to ask.

    Steve
     
  11. treedee3d

    treedee3d F1 Rookie
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    #11 treedee3d, Jan 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
  12. sevminasyan

    sevminasyan Formula 3
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    Just a suggestion. Like what you are doing since I just finished mine up. You are def. on the right route.
     
  13. sevminasyan

    sevminasyan Formula 3
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    Jun 24, 2008
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    Can you call me when you have time. I am still awake. Wanna know if you could help me with something.

    PMed you my number

    thanks
     
  14. Gdude

    Gdude Rookie

    Dec 22, 2011
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    Gregory
    #14 Gdude, Jan 31, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
    Owned a small exotic car restoration shop for 25 years. Did most of the paint and body work myself. Many awards. My two cents, short and sweet.
    I used green epoxy sealer primer on almost everything so leaving the green is not a problem. Scuff and paint the inside first!
    The biggest problem is with the adhesion properties of the original green paint on the outside surface and with the open edges on the chips, dents, body work, etc. You will 100% have a shrinkage line in the future if you leave the original green!
    Strip the outside of the car to bare metal. Sand the fiberglass parts to primer. Treat the metal. Seal the metal with a very thin epoxy sealer/primer. Do your body work. Seal the body work. Lightly sand. Primer with a good quality urethane. Guide coat and block sand. Soft pad sand as a finish measure. Paint one or two coats of color and let dry. Sand again checking for imperfections. If all AOK; hammer it!
    One last suggestion. Choose a paint which can be wet sanded and buffed because you will have imperfections.
    Regards, Greg
     
  15. vvassallo

    vvassallo F1 Veteran

    Aug 4, 2006
    8,191
    Palos Verdes
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    Vince V
    Stock is pretty good finish. As long as it is in good condition, just make sure it is prepared appropriately. Of course, that's another 12 lbs on your car. ;)
     
  16. INTMD8

    INTMD8 F1 Veteran
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    Jun 10, 2007
    5,342
    Lake Villa IL
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    James Moran
    If you prime directly over 80 grit scratches will you not see that through the paint when the primer shrinks over time?

    I've always hated that and assumed it was because the car being primed at too course of a sanding stage.
     

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