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General service costs for a Maserati Khamsin?

Discussion in 'Maserati' started by Auraraptor, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
    I was wondering what the general service costs on a Maserati Khamsin?

    What are service intervals?

    Where does one get parts and service done? (Ferrari dealership?)

    Thank you. I was looking at a '77.
     
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  3. chasking

    chasking Formula Junior

    Nov 27, 2003
    317
    Chicago, IL
    Full Name:
    Chuck King
    If you don't get satisfaction here, try joining this group:

    http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/maserati/

    As far as I can tell, this seems to be the most vibrant on-line community of Maserati enthusiasts. I know for a fact that there are Khamsin owners on the list; I would be shocked if you didn't get a meaningful response.

    Chuck King
    87 Maserati Biturbo Spyder
     
  4. Attitude928

    Attitude928 Formula Junior

    Nov 1, 2003
    934
    NYC
    I have a 5sp '77 Khamsin. The car was previously owned by John Bookout, the ex-CEO of Shell Oil. It was part of the largest Maserati Collection in the US.
    When you first buy a classic you may need to spend some extra $ in order to sort it out. Bookout mainly showed the car, so the body and interior were essentially real good except for one rust bubble around the rear windshield (that'll cost ya). The car already had the Euro bumpers (American ones are uglier) and headers, so that saved me a few thousand. Bookout essentially was a cheap man (the car arrived with no gas in it), so it wasn't sorted out that well.
    The first year (5/03-6/04) cost me $2934 for body and paint work, $493 (well worth it) to rebuild the hydraulic accumulators at the Citroen guru west of Albany, NY, and at a $70/hour labor rate, $2633 to recore the radiator,rebuild the LHM pump, install a third fan and service the car. I have spent little since then. The total (2934+493+2633=6060) is small compared with both the entry prices to buy a comparable Ferrari (e.g. 365GTC/4) or Lamborghini (400GT). The car has chains instead of belts, so the ongoing service costs are also cheaper than a Prancing Horse or Bull.
    As long as no one added brakefluid to the hydraulic system, the Khamsin is a relative steal.
    Jordan
     
  5. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
    Thank you both for your responses!

    Mr. King,
    I will ask there as well. Thank you for the site.

    Attitude928,
    My concern is with servicing...basicly I have no idea where I would take it to get serviced reasonably. Does your tech in NY know of any respectable techs in MD?
     
  6. snj5

    snj5 F1 World Champ

    Feb 22, 2003
    10,213
    San Antonio
    Full Name:
    Russ Turner
    Would recommend Grand Touring in Laurel, MD.
    It's a beuatiful car! Good luck!
     
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  8. steveirl

    steveirl Formula 3

    Dec 29, 2003
    1,156
    ireland
    Full Name:
    steve
  9. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
    I called them, and they say it has no rust. It also has 88k miles.

    How many miles does a Mas engine run for before needing a top end or complete rebuild?

    I ask as for Ferraris the number is around 80-120k miles...

    Mr Russ, thank you. It is good to know there is servicer/tech nearby.

    Steve, your link provided interesting information. Thanks!
     
  10. steveirl

    steveirl Formula 3

    Dec 29, 2003
    1,156
    ireland
    Full Name:
    steve
    btw, congrats on the Khamsin, i just love em, older Maseratis really are special, dont be too afraid of the citroen based hydraulics, it is essentially a simple system similair to that found in the citroen CX and any mechanic competent in the area can work on it, although most parts are no longer available the majority can be overhauled and/or remade by a hydraulic workshop, most important to change the LHM fluid regularily
    good luck
    steve
     
  11. lukek

    lukek Formula 3

    May 2, 2003
    2,046
    San Francisco
    Full Name:
    LK
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  13. davem

    davem F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Jan 21, 2002
    6,250
    Stepford, Connecticut
    Full Name:
    dave m
  14. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
  15. Ira Schwartz

    Ira Schwartz Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    May 20, 2003
    1,830
    Brooklandville, MD
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    Ira Schwartz
    Omar- There's a Citroen specialist in Annapolis, if that helps. If you buy the car and need his name/number, let me know and I'll get it for you. Do you know Marc Sonnery at Motorcar Gallery in Ft. Lauderdale? He's very knowledgable, and recently bought a Khamsin for himself- I suspect he could be a useful guy to speak with. Good luck.
     
  16. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
    They do not seem to like me very much.... I am getting flamed a bit..heh. Guess they think I am some troll or something. *sigh*
     
  17. lukek

    lukek Formula 3

    May 2, 2003
    2,046
    San Francisco
    Full Name:
    LK
    I do not think it is that. I thought Stephen's answer was very well written, quite philosophical, really. It could be generalized for any exotics.

    Even with the most thorough inspection, there is no way of knowing what the maintenenance costs are going to be. If you like the car, make sure it is not rusting heap with low compression, but then just dive in....

    With regard to service, you just have to find a mechanic who has worked on one before (Citoren hydraulics, in particular), or you are paying extra hours for someone to learn. I would guess that it would cost a little more to run your 328 because the parts are more expensive. Reward for that is that you will not see yourself coming and going at every Italian car meet.

    I drove a late Indy once, and them brakes sure take some getting used to....But they work well.
     
  18. Attitude928

    Attitude928 Formula Junior

    Nov 1, 2003
    934
    NYC
    You don't need a Citroen guy to be your mechanic. Get an independent mechanic who knows Maseratis in order to do the regular maintanence (eg Weber tuning). Then get a Citroen guy to periodically check the 3 accumulators and the LHM pump. The car usually leaks some oil and some hydraulic fluid (i.e. LHM). Before you drive the car, you check the water, oil and LHM levels. That blue euro-bumpered Khamsin is beautiful. You need a good mechanic to go over that 88K engine before you buy it. I love the steering (2 turns lock to lock). The clutch is very sensitive, so you can't launch without screeching the back tires. It's hard to change into your gym shorts and use the "sensitive" brakes at the same time. But, you'll get used to them as well.
     
  19. wrecktech

    wrecktech Formula Junior

    Jun 4, 2004
    364
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
  20. chasking

    chasking Formula Junior

    Nov 27, 2003
    317
    Chicago, IL
    Full Name:
    Chuck King
    Auraraptor, sorry the car got sold out from under you.

    If you really want a Khamsin, they come up for sale fairly regularly, and while they generally cost more than that one, I've seen lots of them priced in the 20s, which seems ridiculously low for such a car. I suspect that the steering and brakes are weird enough that they keep away the uninitiated who think, "Hey, Maserati! Cool!" without any understanding of what it means to own one. (Those people then go buy Ferrari 308s and Mondials, and then skimp on the periodic maintenance.) Ironically, that may mean that somebody who owns one today will generally have a good idea of what he was getting into, which hopefully in turn will mean that they will be better maintained. They may be less likely to suffer from the aforementioned syndrome where someone buys the car because its initial price is cheap, then when the actual costs of ownership become apparent corners are cut or service is simply neglected.

    I hope you weren't too put off by that initial response on the Yahoo! group. That group is really a great bunch of people, and I would NEVER have considered buying a Maserati if I didn't know they were out there. But they didn't know that you are one of the pillars of the Ferrari community, and that initial post to them probably looked like if someone came here and posted, "Hey, I saw this high-mileage Ferrari 400 for sale really cheap! Is that a good car to drive to work everyday?" To be fair, that post would probably draw the same kind of slightly-condescending "Intro to the World of Exotic Cars" response from some veteran on this board. But if you do end up with an old Maserati, they will be immensely helpful.
     
  21. chasking

    chasking Formula Junior

    Nov 27, 2003
    317
    Chicago, IL
    Full Name:
    Chuck King
  22. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,491
    MO
    Mr. King, my initial reaction was that there was a slight underlying condescending tone to some posts, but after reading them over carefully, I see I was wrong. Very helpful posts.

    I was surprised though that running and maintaince costs can exceed my 328's. Also that parts are so very difficult to find. I guess we are a bit spoiled in the Ferrari world in this regard.

    I am also interested to know what they mean when they say it is a "different" driving experiance or that "it drives like a Citroen." I have never seen, let alone driven a Citroen here in the States. In my mind, I always pictured this car as a more modern Maserati version of the Daytona, espcially one with the very attractive euro style bumpers front/rear. It seems this is not the case.
     
  23. chasking

    chasking Formula Junior

    Nov 27, 2003
    317
    Chicago, IL
    Full Name:
    Chuck King
    Khamsins shared a hydraulic system with their Citroen cousins, which makes the operation of various car systems different from the standard non-hydraulically-infested car. Of particular note are the steering and brakes. The brakes in particular reportedly take a lot of getting used to: the pedal barely moves; the force of the brakes depends on the pressure applied to the nearly-stationary pedal. And, the sensitivity of the steering changes at different speeds, and according to one review I read is twitchy at low speeds.

    I have never actually driven either a Khamsin or a Citroen, so this is derived from reading various road tests from car magazines, but they were unanimous in commenting on the unusualness of the steering and brakes. However, an owner I spoke to once did say that once one gets used to the car everything is fine. But, it could make trying to evaluate one in a road test difficult, if you're not familiar with them.
     

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