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Help to solve oilleak from gearbox

Discussion in '348/355' started by THL, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. THL

    THL Karting
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    Jun 11, 2009
    154
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    Thomas Harvej Larsen
    Hi Guys

    My 1998 355F1 has a small oil leak from where the gearlever goes into the gearbox, it is leaking gear oil, not hydrulic oil. It seems to be the seal around the gearlever, so is there a shortcut to change the gearbox control rod rubber boot, if that is what it is called :)
    I recall to have seen it here somewhere but cant find it.

    Looking forward to some help

    Regards Thomas
     
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  3. Ricambi America

    Ricambi America F1 World Champ
    Sponsor Owner

    #5, and #62 on this diagram:
    http://www.ricambiamerica.com/parts_catalogs.php?V=diag&I=1472
     
  4. THL

    THL Karting
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    Jun 11, 2009
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    Thomas Harvej Larsen
    Thats the excact spot.

    My question is if there is any "easy" way to install/replace these two part numbers, think I have seen pictures and description once........

    Regards Thomas
     
  5. Justlooking

    Justlooking Rookie

    Aug 30, 2009
    11
    #4 Justlooking, Mar 8, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2010
    I've just done this on my manual box F355, it's a fairly common leak point so I was told.
    It's not difficult to change, if the boot is in good condition there is no need to change it just the seal (in my opinion). If gearbox oil has soaked into it though it may have expanded and be a loose fit.
    Anyway procedure is as follows:
    Remove engine undertray.
    Disconnect linkage (one bolt) and move out of the way.
    Remove old boot.
    Remove old seal by making a couple of holes in the centre face of seal opposite each other. Use the holes to pry out the seal taking care not to scratch the housing.
    Tap in the new seal evenly until it won't go any further, i.e. flush with the gearbox case.
    Put a new boot back on if needed.
    Reconnect linkage.
    Replace engine undertray.

    Simple.
     
  6. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    Nicholas
    I'm leaking in this exact spot. Just ordered these two parts from Ricambi before actually finding this post. Though replacement is straight forward and easy enough, my question is "will I lose much fluid when I remove this seal? Should I drain the gearbox first and then fill with fresh fluid (mind you this fluid is freshly changed as of 12 months ago and only 4,000 miles), or will fluid loss be a minimum when replacing this seal; saving me the pain of draining and filling?
     
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  8. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    No you will not loose much, just a little. Not much at all and can be measured in drops.
     
  9. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    Oh, thank goodness. Makes me all the more eager to tackle it.

    Thanks!
     
  10. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    #8 Genyosai, Sep 12, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Which one? #30, #47, or #33. I'm thinking bolt #30 then the rod can be pushed away freely? If that's the case, this area is exposed and does not require the removal of the under-tray.
    Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
  11. WATSON

    WATSON F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Sep 9, 2010
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    L.W. Wright
    I replaced that seal on my F1. In order to do it you need to pull the actuator out of the way. <gulp> I marked mine and all went back together correctly. Truth is you need to have the actuator re-set with an SD-1. I had mine looked at a year later and it all fell within parameters. Use a paint stick and mark where the studs are in relation to the actuator.

    This should be a breeze on a 6 speed.

    The seal itself is in there pretty good and requires a solid pop from a well placed screwdriver / hammer combo to get released. The new one presses in pretty easily. I used an appropriately sized socket to ensure even pressure as I applied it.

    My gear box was drained when I did it so no idea if it would leak once removed from a full box....my guess would be yes.

    Good luck...post results!
     
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  13. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    I have already answered that question. There will only be very minimum drops.
     
  14. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    #11 mr.steve, Sep 12, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
    Genyosai, may i help you :) First of, yes this job is done without the removal of any of the under trays. No disrespect to Justlooking, But I don't think he has done this job on a 355 reading what he wrote :( I mean, "remove one bolt" :rolleyes:
    Remove nut and bolt number 47 & 48. In the diagram you can see that bolt number 47 fits into one half of the rubber sandwiched metal flange thing ( numb 43). Also undo the 4 ( number 50)nuts that hold the said metal bracket to the rubber sandwich filling :) By the way that rubber part in the diagram numbers 44 is incorrect, this rubber section is twice the size and has 4 bolts passing through it and not just two as shown ;) Some times the piece #43 can be installed at the bottom of the sandwich and not at the top as the diagram shows. It's a choice on how one installs it, and maybe the cars already had an engine out.
    Then without disturbing position of the gear selector stub that comes out of the gearbox, remove the metal flange/bracket thing (#43)
    Make life easyer on your self and just slip your car into a gear before you undo anything. This will give you peace of mind that the car is in the selected gear when you put the metal bracket back. Just don't knock the gear selector stub while you change the new seal. Don't worry though, it takes a big knock to, knock it out of the gear you have selected.
    Once the flange is removed then remove nut and bolt number 30 and slip number 39 from the end of the selector stub.

    Removing bolt number 30 just by its self will not work. However there is a way of doing it, but this involves selecting reverse gear while the bolts removed. But trust me when I say you don't need the ball ache of trying to find which position your gears are in, in relation to were your gear stick is if you knock it out of gear;) Especialy if your are inexperienced in how it works.
     
  15. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    Thanks, Steve. The diagram only shows one of part #44 for the sake of diagram clutter. Because the two pieces are identical, they only show you one, just like part #53 is only shown once though we know there are really three. As for disassembling the "sandwich", removing the bracket and then slipping off #39.... does this somehow keep the gear-shift in the position you've selected? For instance, I have the car in 1st gear. I was under the impression that as soon as I disconnected the shifting rod, that the gear-shift lever would move freely. That said, can I not just remove bolt #30 and slip off #39 from the selector rod in the gearbox by pushing the entire shift rod towards the front of the car (like moving the gear-shift lever to 2nd gear position; pulling the shift rod away from the unbolted selector rod in the gearbox)?

    Just curious as to how disassembling the sandwich helps in case the gearbox is knocked out of gear.

    Thanks.

    --Nick
     
  16. WATSON

    WATSON F1 World Champ
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    So just leaking slightly while installing new seal?

    OK Mr Steve......carry on.
     
  17. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    #14 mr.steve, Sep 13, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
    LOL, yea thanks for that ;)
    Yes
    Yes as i said it can be done if you select reverse, because this will pull the long shift rod away more than selecting 2nd.The problem is when you try to re fit #39 and your by your self, you cant be in the car and under the car at the same time.you will have to have some one guide the rod into #39 at the same time as the gear shift is placed into say 2nd gear. The method i have given you is done solo just from under the car, without the chance of pushing the gear box stub into a new gear by accident.

    The method i gave you is the easy way/step by step for a solo person who i thought might have been a novice at doing this. removing the sandwitch only takes a moment and gives you alot of room to work in.
    But please, if you want to do it by pulling away the gear stick rod by selecting 2nd, go for it.
    It may be beneficial to you just to get a mate fo sit in the car while you are under it. Get him to select all the gears so you will get an understanding of how the gear box shift stub works. While you are there you will see that reverse pulls it away further.
    Any way, good luck in any way you do it. I hope i have helped you in some small way.
     
  18. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    They say that pictures speak a 1000 words :) While i have a car up i made a quick video to show the method i am trying to describe.
    Video #1 shows how the gear box stub moves when the gears are selected from 1-6 and then reverse. You will also see that there would be very little room to work in while changing the seal if just slid forward of the stub. There for increasing the risk of knocking the stub and changing gear.
    Video #2 shows the method i find easy. This method takes no time at all and gives all the room you need. Plus once the car is in a gear (in this care 2nd). there is no need to go back in the cockpit to try and align the bracket back onto the stub.
    I hope and think this will help others understand how the set up works. :)

    Video #1 [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHQBRemn-o4&feature=plcp[/ame]

    Video #2 [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCZU3GhhoFk&feature=plcp[/ame]
     
  19. andyw355

    andyw355 Karting

    Jul 5, 2011
    72
    Australia
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    Andy
    I have the same leak, the oil messed up the paint on the subframe. Found the boot is held in place with a ziptie! Will replace both soon using this method. Great thread and videos, thanks!
     
  20. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    This makes my day, glad the videos helped you understand.
    I originally posted them to help Genyosai, but he disappeared of the face of the earth with out a word.
    More fool me, but your welcome andy355 :)
     
  21. ronrob

    ronrob Formula Junior

    Jan 15, 2007
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    Ronald Brown
    Missed that Vid. What else could one ask for? (apart from you turning up and doing the job yourself - rubber gloves an' all!). Lovely job.
     
  22. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    No, I didn't disappear :D My work load varies heavily, so I can disappear from the boards from time to time. I really want to watch the videos, but when I try playing them, they say "private".
     
  23. mr.steve

    mr.steve Guest

    Apr 6, 2012
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    Ron S
    Yea I took them down after 8 days. I assumed you had watched them and sorted the problem.
     
  24. gus355

    gus355 Formula Junior

    Aug 3, 2011
    569
    B.C. and WA
    I have also replaced this seal even though the prev. owner claimed it was done (the seal in my car was old).

    After some time of studying it and watching my co-worker (who was contemplating how to remove the seal) I used a cordless drill to screw two drywall screws into the seal and pulled it right out.
     
  25. Genyosai

    Genyosai Formula Junior

    May 28, 2008
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    Nicholas
    :(
     
  26. UPAUTO

    UPAUTO Rookie

    Apr 13, 2011
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    Nottingham, U.K
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    Tony Kuo
  27. Challenge

    Challenge Formula 3

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  28. UPAUTO

    UPAUTO Rookie

    Apr 13, 2011
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    #25 UPAUTO, Oct 30, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012
    Your welcome :)

    I used this tool - http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-58430-Shaft-Type-Puller/dp/B000FPYW4K

    Take it out is very very easy 20 sec, I found it was bloody difficlt to insert one in, took me a while.

    Tony
     

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