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I didn't think I'd see it this fast, ICE is history...

Discussion in 'F1' started by johnireland, Sep 6, 2020.

  1. Remy Zero

    Remy Zero Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 26, 2005
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    MC Cool Breeze
    I do not think it will be over for ICE cars that far. Most posters here are focusing on the EU.

    For example, people over here still favours ICE. There's no way anyone wants to wait 45 mins for a charge while halfway down a 600 km journey. The speed limit here on highways are 110 km/h. Many, including me, do not follow this, as I average around 140 whilst most do 150-160 here.

    The weather here means the AC is always switched on with the coolest mode. People here are always in the hurry to get to places. Manufacturers have to spend tonnes to invest in EV charging stations here, and frankly, it will never take off due to costs.

    The whole EV nonsense might work in EU, at most Japan (however they prefer the Shinkansen even vs flights), and at maybe certain parts of China. No way the rest of Asia will adopt this EV crap.
     
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  3. Beau365

    Beau365 Formula 3

    Feb 27, 2005
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    And at the other end, a healthier society places less burden on its heatlh services.

    At the rate things are going people will be cooped up in their boxes with most things possible online.

    George Orwell was onto something !
     
  4. JackCongo

    JackCongo Formula Junior
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    Same in Africa. The whole continent suffers every single day with major power outages. EV are not going to invade African streets and roads anytime soon. The African continent will first « swallow » all ICE vehicles that Europe and the US will ban! :)
     
  5. jgonzalesm6

    jgonzalesm6 F1 World Champ
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    #204 jgonzalesm6, Jan 17, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
    Exposing F1’s Emissions

    Bring up the subject of F1’s carbon footprint and its contribution to the Climate Crisis on Twitter and you’re bound to see some pretty triggered responses.

    Sadly we’ve seen over recent years that understanding the lack sustainability in F1 isn’t the only trigger point for F1 fans, with the predominantly white and male audience showing a common propensity to promote racial hatred towards Lewis Hamilton, while shouting about how grid girls aren’t sexist and at the same time as repeating out-dated sexist myths about why there won’t be another woman in an F1 seat.

    While the latter points can’t necessarily be levelled at the majority white, majority male media that covers the sport, the industry press has frankly failed to give any meaningful coverage to the Climate Crisis and F1’s role in it.

    This has never been more important, with just seven years to avert the worst case Climate Crisis scenarios, while F1 has simultaneously got into bed with Aramco – the single biggest emitter of CO2 in the 20th Century – and is promoting a highly vague goal to go carbon-neutral by 2030 that lacks transparency in how this will be achieved and what this will cover.

    So, how green is F1? And should fans get trigged at understanding their entertainment of choice has huge ecological and human health implications?

    Flight Footprint

    A recent study by Linnaeus University in Sweden declared that just 1% of people cause half of global aviation emissions, with those flying more than 56,000km per year – equivalent to three long-haul flights – accounting for the greatest level of damage to human and planetary health.

    The average F1 team staff member who attends each race of the season can expect to travel as distance of 170,700km during each season – this is three times higher than the 1% who cause half of global aviation emissions.

    For the average UK F1 personnel attending each race event, their carbon footprint is over 28.99 tonnes during the course of a typical F1 season. This is on top of the 8.34 tonne carbon footprint of the average UK resident, which covers everything from food, to driving, and tech to clothing consumption.

    To put that in context, the global average carbon footprint in 2017 – the latest year for which complete data is available – is just 4.7 tonnes of CO2 per person. As such, the average F1 team member is creating six times more emissions than the average person on this planet.

    And that is for just one team member.

    According to Autosport, each team typically averages 100 personnel at a race event during any given season, covering everything from the mechanics to marketing.

    Therefore, on just travel to and from circuits alone, the average F1 team has a carbon footprint of 2,899 tonnes of CO2 per season – meaning that the 10 teams on the F1 grid account for 28,990 tonnes of CO2 per season.

    One other important consideration is that this only looks at CO2 emissions – which stay in our atmosphere for between 300-1,000 years. However, jet planes also emit high levels of nitrous oxide, which is 289 times more powerful than CO2 over the first 20 years and can last in our atmosphere for over a century.

    Therefore, on the flights of just team personnel alone, we can see how incredibly harmful F1 is as an industry.

    Methodology

    The methodology for these calculations is below:

    • Using the 2019 F1 calendar to reflect a more normal F1 season compared to 2020, which had more back-to-back and European races
    • Using MyClimate – an independent non-profit organisation used to calculate emissions per flight
    • Emissions were calculated based on the average team personnel member’s flight in economy class from London Heathrow airport to the nearest event airport (with the majority of teams and personnel based in the UK, this gives the clearest average)
    • All average flights were multiplied by 100 members of staff (average number of personnel attending a race according to Autosport)
    • The emissions per team were then multiplied by 10 to give the emissions for all teams
    Please note that this does not include the flight emissions for shipping F1 corporate personnel, FIA personnel, safety cars and other equipment, nor any of the media to races. This also does not include flight emissions for test or filming days, as these vary by team and season.

    One important factor to note here is that we did not include the estimated 50 tonnes of cargo each team takes to each race. This has not been included in our calculations as some cargo is shipped by road for European rounds – which of course entails its own emissions.

    Given the average of 50 tonnes of cargo for each race – as well as rushed parts being delivered by private jet in some instances – we can expect the flight emissions from parts to be as high, or higher, than personnel.

    Event Emissions

    In addition to the caveats above, it is important to note that this only accounts for the emissions of direct members of race team staff.

    It does not account for the vast amount of media, merchandise and food vendors or fans who attend race events. Nor does this include the energy used to power the circuit facilities – including lights for night time events – nor does it cover the emissions of the cars themselves at races.

    While the latter is likely negligible compared to the industry as a whole, if we are to tackle the Climate Crisis, we need to count every single emission to avert cataclysm.

    Additional Emissions

    Then there are the unseen emissions in F1.

    Creating the carbon fibre for cars and testing them in windtunnels requires a vast amount of energy, and while the latter is likely to be phased out in the coming years, the rise of data centre usage to track everything from aerodynamic performance to fan engagement will also require an untold amount of power.

    Then there is the issue of the factories that F1 teams run; the energy they use for lights, computers and canteens – as well as the emissions that staff create driving to work. This is not to blame staff in any way, this is part-and-parcel of their job, but it all counts.

    In addition to the emissions from teams, we must also consider the emissions that F1 as a brand is responsible for.

    The construction industry is a major source of emissions worldwide, and F1 regularly demands tracks upgrade and conduct renovations to increase fan capacity, extend run-off areas or simply to resurface the track. All of these cause huge emissions.

    Then there is the issue of new tracks being built. Despite vast investment – often from the taxpayer – places like India and South Korea saw F1 only visit a handful of times. They have premium grade international circuits that are now not used at the highest level, despite the land being cleared, and vast amounts of concrete, metal and oil products being used to build them.

    For once, the issue of ecological damage surfaced around the proposed construction of a new circuit in Rio, which would see pristine forestland removed to build the track. Not only will this create emissions, but it will remove the carbon sinks that are soaking up emissions.

    Of course there is also the unspoken fact that F1 is still heavily pushing Big Oil and the use of internal combustion engine cars – and, yes, this includes hybrids. Every race fans are bombarded with adverts, sponsor logos and TV features on how oil and lubricant partners have helped a team gain an extra tenth.

    This level of marketing matters – why else would oil and automotive companies pump tens of millions of dollars into it every year?

    We have known since the 1960s that the use of internal combustion engine vehicles and our vast consumption of oil has driven the climate crisis and needs to stop – not be reduced, but stopped. F1 is promoting the continuation of this industry, and therefore the destruction of our planet.

    F1’s Carbon Neutrality Plan

    F1 has stated that it plans to be carbon neutral by 2030, covering “the Formula 1 cars and on-track activity and the rest of the operations as a sport”.

    This is incredibly vague language that offers no insight into what this will actually cover – is it just the cars and F1 as an organisation, or does that include the teams too? The emissions from flying 1,000s of staff to events? The energy required to make carbon fibre? The emissions from circuit construction?

    The list of questions goes on.

    Meanwhile F1 is droning on about running hybrid engines and “sustainable fuels” – frankly the emissions from 20 cars on a track is the least of the world’s problems, and most of those “sustainable” fuels are being grown on land that was once used for food.

    F1 is being deliberately obtuse in which questions it chooses to answer on this front, and is therefore directly engaged in greenwashing.

    F1 is directly responsible for everything from 1,000s of media personnel to track building and upgrade emissions – without F1’s demand, these things would not happen. And, as such, they should be incorporated into F1’s carbon neutrality plan.

    Doubtlessly F1 will claim that it will offset its emissions through carbon-offsetting plans, but it has been known for decades that this is nothing more than a greenwashing ploy that helps brands look like they are taking action, when they are doing nothing.

    Without reducing emissions in the first place, there is no meaningful potential for achieving carbon neutrality.

    Here are just some of the unanswered questions that need urgent and meaningful answers to avoid F1 simply greenwashing the sport and continuing to do a vast amount of ecological and human health harm:

    1. Will F1’s carbon neutrality plan cover teams as well as F1 as a brand entity?
    2. If teams are included, will that cover all staff activity – from race attendance, to merch and filming days?
    3. Will F1’s emissions be verified by an independent watchdog to ensure transparency?
    4. Will F1 regularly report on its emissions in the build up to, and post, 2030?
    5. Will F1’s carbon neutrality plan cover the incredibly high energy consumption to form carbon fibre and the use of windtunnels?
    6. Will F1 include fan attendance at grand prix, or is that something it expects fans to cover?
    7. Will F1 include the emissions from track construction and renovations – an industry that accounts for enormous emissions worldwide?
    8. Will F1 include the destruction of natural resources to create or update tracks (e.g. Proposed Rio Grand Prix)?
    9. Will F1 include the emissions from media attendance at events?
    10. Will F1 include the emissions from F1 drivers’ own private jets?
    11. How will F1 actually achieve the promises that it has made?
    Now What?

    Now it’s time for the motorsport media and fans to step up.

    F1, and the motorsport industry at large, needs to be held accountable for its emissions – and the industry press (or at least that which isn’t owned my Liberty Media) needs to be making noise about this issue. F1 is not immune to the Climate Crisis.

    Is this an attack on the sport you love? No. But is a call for it to be better.

    If you want to see loud cars which burn oil go round a track quickly, then that is possible – but only if we reduce every other emission level in the sport and in society. It is up to all of us to act.

    We have less than seven years…

    https://apexracingpr.wordpress.com/2020/12/04/exposing-f1s-emissions/
     
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  6. 635CSI

    635CSI Formula 3
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    **** Off
     
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  8. 635CSI

    635CSI Formula 3
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    Sorry that’s a bit juvenile, but he lost me at the fact that I wasn’t “necessarily” a racist. Or, maybe it was the repeated use of the word “triggered”.
     
  9. william

    william F1 World Champ
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    Hummm

    At this rate, we may as well do away with any international sporting, cultural or political event that draw crowds worldwide.

    They all use air transport to bring the public, and the media to various locations.

    What about the Olympics, the G8 and G20 conferences, the World Football Cup, etc ... ?

    What about banning holidays abroad, since every year there is a massive migration comes Summer time ?

    They can impose solutions to car use, but we have yet to see any for aviation (the main culprit?) or navigation.

    Since many governments imposed themselves 2030 as the turning point when we should become almost carbon free (if that's possible), I expect some panic in

    high places as we get to the deadline.

    "Decide in haste, repent at leisure" has never been more appropriate.
     
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  10. Remy Zero

    Remy Zero Two Time F1 World Champ

    Apr 26, 2005
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    MC Cool Breeze
    Global warming is inevitable .
     
  11. william

    william F1 World Champ
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    Where are the majority of cars made?

    In Japan, China, North America and Europe, where reduction of ICE and electrification is taking place.

    I cannot see how countries that don't make cars, but buy them, can escape the trend in the long run.

    Other large producers like India or Brazil would be cut off the international market if they don't follow.
     
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  13. william

    william F1 World Champ
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    Possibly, but is it "man made" as many pretend?

    Climate changes are cyclic, the scientits keep telling us.
     
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  14. Mitch Alsup

    Mitch Alsup F1 Veteran

    Nov 4, 2003
    7,406
    a) does not consume fuel
    b) billions of bicycle miles will not wear roads out
    c) manufacture cost will be DIV 30 the cheapest car
    d) owner maintanence
    e) parts last essentialy forever (excepting tires)
    leaving nothing left to tax.
     
  15. Beau365

    Beau365 Formula 3

    Feb 27, 2005
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    Beau

    Meanwhile Government Ministers fail to follow their own rules and contract Covid-19.

    These Muppets tell us they know best :D
     
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  16. william

    william F1 World Champ
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    William Denoyelles

    Believe me, inventing new taxes if never a problem !
     

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