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Monterey car auction extravaganza

Discussion in 'Vintage Ferrari Market' started by Timmmmmmmmmmy, Jul 27, 2015.

  1. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    #1 Timmmmmmmmmmy, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
    There are 115 Ferrari's for sale at Monterey ranging from the 1950 275S/340 America at RM thru the 2013 F458 Challenge Evo also at RM. The list includes multiple F40s, 308/328's, 246 Dino's (9), Daytona's, 330/365GTC, Lusso, 330GTS and more. Price's are strong across the board with some startlingly high. Million dollar daytona's, 4 million dollars 275GTB, Rick Cole has an alloy 275GTB estimated to sell for a minimum of 7.8 million USD.

    Key
    B=Bonhams
    G=Gooding & Co.
    M=Mecum
    RC=Rick Cole
    RM=RM
    RS=Russo & Steele
    Estimate (given as low estimate in USD)
    (*) See my second post

    1950 Ferrari 275S/ 340 America Scaglietti Barchetta #0030MT (*) RM Lot 217 7.5m+
    1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Cabriolet #0159E (*) B Lot 56 2.4m+
    1955 Ferrari 250GT Europa GT Competizione #0387GT/0139EU RC Lot 1130 N/A
    1956 Ferrari 250GT Boano Coupe #0435GT RM Lot 341 1.25m+
    1956 Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta Competition 'Tour de France' #0557GT (*) RM Lot 332 N/A
    1957 Ferrari 250GT Boano Coupe #0667GT RM Lot 215 1.3m+
    1957 Ferrari 410SA Series II Pininfarina Coupe #0717SA (*) G Lot 135 5m+
    1959 Ferrari 250GT Pininfarina Cabriolet Series II #1213GT RM Lot 225 1.5m+
    1959 Ferrari 250GT Pininfarina Coupe #1301GT RM Lot 339 675k+
    1959 Ferrari 250GT California Spider #1307GT (*) RM Lot 118 9m+
    1959 Ferrari 250GT Interim Berlinetta #1519GT (*) B Lot 56 9m+
    1960 Ferrari 250GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione #1773GT (*) RM Lot 125 N/A
    1960 Ferrari 250GT Coupe #1825GT G Lot 138 750k+
    1960 Ferrari 250GT Pininfarina Cabriolet Series II #2047GT RM Lot 317 1.8m+
    1961 Ferrari 250GT Pininfarina Cabriolet Series II #2533GT G Lot 153 1.8m+
    1961 Ferrari 250GTE #2651GT G Lot 116 550k+
    1961 Ferrari 250GTE #2927GT G Lot 057 350k+
    1961 Ferrari 250GT SWB California Spider #3095GT (*) G Lot 129 16m+
    1962 Ferrari 250GT SWB Berlinetta Bertone Speciale #3269GT (*) G Lot 039 14m+
    1962 Ferrari 250GTE #4001GT B Lot 81 400k+
    1963 Ferrari 250GT Lusso #4393GT RM Lot 328 1.8m+
    1963 Ferrari 250GT Lusso #5003GT RS Lot 4001 N/A
    1964 Ferrari 250GT Lusso #5607GT RM Lot 242 2.3m+
    1964 Ferrari 250GT Lusso #5817GT M Lot S85 2.25m+
    1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast #6049SA G Lot 020 3m+
    1964 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 RS Lot 4044 N/A
    1964 Ferrari 250 LM #6105 (*) RM Lot 113 N/A
    1965 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 #6537 RC Lot 950 300k+
    1964 Ferrari 275GTB #6563 M Lot S91 2.75m+
    1965 Ferrari 275GTB #7053 RC Lot 1110 2.2m+
    1965 Ferrari 275GTS #7559 G Lot 059 1.8m+
    1966 Ferrari 206S Dino Spider #026 (*) G Lot 034 2.6m+
    1966 Ferrari 330GT Series II #8361 B Lot 108 300k+
    1966 Ferrari 275GTB/6C Alloy #8517 (*) RM Lot 309 3.6m+
    1966 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 #8639 RS Lot 4031 N/A
    1966 Ferrari 330GTC #9237 G Lot 010 800k+
    1966 Ferrari 275GTB/4 Alloy #9413 RC Lot 1000 7.8m+
    1967 Ferrari 330GTS #9781 RM Lot 230 2.65m+
    1967 Ferrari 275GTB/4 #9925 RC Lot 1100 3.4m+
    1967 Ferrari 275GTB/4 #10051 RM Lot 121 3.5m+
    1967 Ferrari 275GTB/4 #10803 G Lot 029 N/A
    1968 Ferrari 330GTS #10913 M Lot S101 3m+
    1968 Ferrari 330GTC #11279 RM Lot 316 750k+
    1968 Ferrari 330GTC #11427 RM Lot 251 800k+
    1968 Ferrari 365GT 2+2 #11649 B Lot 49 250k+
    1968 Ferrari 365GTC #12035 G Lot 106 800k+
    1969 Ferrari 365GTC #12315 RC Lot 820 875k+
    1969 Ferrari 365GTC #12407 RM Lot 211 850k+
    1969 Ferrari 365GTC #12415 G Lot 053 900k+
    1969 Ferrari 246GT #00320 G Lot 021 725k+
    1971 Ferrari 365GTB/4 #14191 G Lot 007 650k+
    1971 Ferrari 365GTB/4 #14335 B Lot 90 600k+
    1971 Ferrari 365GTS/4 #14537 B Lot 59 2.5m+
    1971 Ferrari 365GTC/4 #14871 B Lot 6 275k+
    1971 Ferrari 246GT #2938 RS Lot 4054 N/A
    1972 Ferrari 365GTC/4 #15255 B Lot 101 250k+
    1972 Ferrari 365GTB/4 #15757 M Lot S89 1m+
    1972 Ferrari 365GTC/4 #15933 G Lot 012 400k+
    1972 Ferrari 246GTS #3128 M Lot S73 350k+
    1972 Ferrari 365GTC/4 RS Lot 4035 N/A
    1973 Ferrari 246GTS #4870 RS Lot 4027 N/A
    1972 Ferrari 246GT #4892 RM Lot 322 375k+
    1973 Ferrari 365GTB/4 #17607 G Lot 157 750k+
    1973 Ferrari 246GT #6626 B Lot 71 330k+
    1973 Ferrari 246GT #7134 M Lot S55 350k+
    1974 Ferrari 365GT4 2+2 #18037 M Lot F24 100k+
    1974 Ferrari 246GTS #7794 RM Lot 123 350k+
    1974 Ferrari 246GTS #7798 G Lot 004 400k+
    1974 Ferrari 246GTS #7874 G Lot 148 350k+
    1976 Ferrari 308GTB Vetroresina #19397 G Lot 101 175k+
    1978 Ferrari 308GTS #23271 M Lot F101 125k+
    1978 Ferrari 308GTB #24721 M Lot F135 125k+
    1978 Ferrari 512BB #24881 RM Lot 228 400k+
    1979 Ferrari 308GTB #30461 B Lot 103 90k+
    1980 Ferrari 512BB #30931 G Lot 104 350k+
    1983 Ferrari 308GTS QV #46541 RM Lot 302 75k+
    1984 Ferrari 512BBi #48723 M Lot S113 650k+
    1985 Ferrari 308GTB #53039 M Lot F108 90k+
    1985 Ferrari 288 GTO #54243 B Lot 32 2.5m+
    1985 Ferrari 288 GTO #55181 RM Lot 124 2.4m+
    1986 Ferrari Testarossa #63631 M Lot S56 N/A
    1987 Ferrari 328GTS #67927 B Lot 21 75k+
    1987 Ferrari 328GTS #72494 M Lot F112 100k+
    1988 Ferrari 328GTS #78668 M Lot T136.1 N/A
    1989 Ferrari Testarossa #79507 M Lot S152 125k+
    1989 Ferrari 328GTS #79624 M Lot S63 110k+
    1989 Ferrari F40 #80727 M Lot S77 1.2m+
    1989 Ferrari 328GTS #81897 M Lot S99 275k+
    1989 Ferrari Testarossa #82273 RC Lot 1020 285k+
    1989 Ferrari Testarossa #82752 RM Lot 310 200k+
    1990 Ferrari F40 #87200 B Lot 78 1.2m+
    1991 Ferrari F40 #87530 RC Lot 1030 1.2m+
    1992 Ferrari 512TR #92146 M Lot S120 500k+
    1992 Ferrari F40 #92978 G Lot 037 1.1m+
    1993 Ferrari 512TR #95077 M Lot S68 275k+
    1994 Ferrari F40LM #97904 RM Lot 116 2m+
    1995 Ferrari F512M #100483 G Lot 005 450k+
    1995 Ferrari F512M #101251 RM Lot 208 375k+
    1995 Ferrari F50 #104064 RM Lot 106 1.6m+
    1997 Ferrari 456 GTA #107391 M Lot F128 60k+
    1998 Ferrari F333SP #020 (*) G Lot 140 2m+
    1999 Ferrari 456M GTA #111539 M Lot T148 50k+
    2001 Ferrari F550 Barchetta #124293 RM Lot 241 275k+
    2001 Ferrari F550 Barchetta #124300 G Lot 040 550k+
    2001 Ferrari F360 #126543 G Lot 002 100k+
    2002 Ferrari F360 Spider #127073 M Lot F32 80k+
    2002 Ferrari F575M #128695 M Lot S4 115k+
    2003 Ferrari F575M #130836 M Lot S32 375k+
    2003 Ferrari F575M #131989 G Lot 150 140k+
    2005 Ferrari Enzo #141920 RM Lot 103 4m+
    2005 Ferrari 575 Maranello #142572 RM Lot 8 350k+
    2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica #143799 RC Lot 830 650k+
    2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica #145719 G Lot 065 425k+
    2011 Ferrari F599 Alonso #187131 M Lot S49 300k+
    2013 Ferrari F458 #189375 M Lot S110 270k+
    2013 Ferrari F458 Challenge Evoluzione #195266 RM Lot 354 250k+
     
  2. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    #2 Timmmmmmmmmmy, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2015
    My favorite cars for sale at Monterey are really rather diverse and selected on the criteria most important to me. 1 - competition pedigree (Le Mans, Mille Miglia et al), 2 - Model importance, 3 - style, 4 - Provenance, 5 - value. My picks are

    1 - 1956 Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta Competition 'Tour de France' #0557GT. RM Saturday. lot 332.

    Lot description -

    "This long-wheelbase 250 GT may be the most important Tour de France example. As winner of the 1956 Tour de France Auto, it is the primary namesake of the TdF moniker. Chassis number 0557GT is the ninth example of fourteen first-series cars and the seventh of only nine to be clothed in Scaglietti’s louver-less coachwork. Originally sold to the Marquis Alfonso de Portago on April 23, 1956, the car took some months to prepare, with original build sheets showing the specification of the rear axle on August 28 and the Tipo 128B engine on September 10. Registered with Italian tags reading BO 69211 and decorated with #73, the ravishing Berlinetta was entered by the Marquis in the Tour de France Auto on September 17, where he was joined by Ed Nelson. The 1956 TdF was routed at 3,600 miles and included two hill climbs, one drag race, and six races at various circuits, including Le Mans, Comminges, Rheims, and Montlhéry. Portago and Nelson managed to win five of the six circuits, taking 1st overall in the Tour and beating both Stirling Moss’s Mercedes-Benz 300 SL and future three-time Tour winner Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari 250 Europa GT. On October 7, the Marquis drove the Berlinetta to a 1st overall finish at the Coupes du Salon at Montlhéry, while two weeks later the car achieved a 1st in class finish at the Rome Grand Prix. Portago’s final triumph in this car came the following year at the Coupes USA on April 7, where he once again took 1st overall. Sadly, this would be the car’s final outing with the Marquis at the wheel, as his tragic death in the 335 S would occur a month later at the Mille Miglia.

    Following Fon’s passing, chassis number 0557GT was returned to the Maranello factory and was offered by the Portago family to Alfonso’s friend, C. Keith W. Schellenberg, of Richmond, Yorkshire, England, a Lichtenstein-descended shipping magnate. Schellenberg kept 0557GT for over two decades, and the car was seen little before being offered for sale in 1983. Chassis number 0557GT was then purchased by the esteemed Peter G. Palumbo, of England, who sold the car in 1992 to Lorenzo Zambrano, the late and equally esteemed Ferrari collector who resided in Monterrey, Mexico. During his ownership, the car received a ground-up restoration by highly respected Ferrari restorer Bob Smith Coachworks, of Gainesville, Texas. Shortly after the restoration, a leather-bound book documenting the car’s history and restoration process was produced to showcase its amazing story and restoration, and this book still accompanies the car. Often seen during Zambrano’s ownership with California dealer plates reading 31333, the 250 GT was exhibited frequently over the following 12 years, starting with a First in Class win at the International Ferrari Concours d’Elegance at Monterey, California, in August 1994. A few days later, the car was displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, again taking home a First in Class award. Presented as a non-judged entry at the Cavallino Classic in February 1996, the Berlinetta then won the Prix Blancpain Award at the prestigious Louis Vuitton Parc de Bagatelle Concours d’Elegance in Paris in September. Shown at Rétromobile the following February, the car then returned to the United States and was exhibited at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in August 1997, where it garnered a Blue Ribbon award. Presented again at Pebble Beach in August 2004, the Berlinetta won a Third in Class award and then took a Platinum award at the FCA’s International Concours a few days later.

    Following Mr. Zambrano’s passing in May 2014, this exquisite and historically important 250 GT was domiciled within his estate and is now offered for the first time in 23 years. The car remains in excellent condition following a recent service and has clearly been very well maintained after its restoration by Bob Smith Coachworks. Prior to the sale, 0557GT was shipped to the Ferrari specialists at Motion Products Inc. in Neenah, Wisconsin, who found the vehicle to be in wonderful condition both cosmetically and mechanically. As the first 250 GT Berlinetta to win the Tour de France and the fifth of only seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition berlinettas, 0557GT is without exaggeration one of the most significant Ferrari competition sports cars to ever be offered publically. It holds a highly significant place in Ferrari history and stands head and shoulders above the rest of TdF production as the most important example of the model. Also claiming the unique original ownership of the fascinating Marquis Alfonso de Portago, one of racing’s most flamboyant fallen stars, this sensational TdF is accompanied by copies of its original build sheets and period photographs, affirming its fantastic history. Undoubtedly the most important of all the 250 GT Tour de France examples, this influential long-wheelbase Berlinetta should attract the interest of top-tier Ferrari collectors and connoisseurs worldwide, as it would comfortably join the most significant collections of Maranello’s finest. This very TdF gave the model its iconic nickname with its stunning victory at that race in 1956, and as such, it is not only a valuable piece of Ferrari lore but also a hugely significant and successful competition vehicle. This represents the first time chassis 0557GT has been offered for sale in over two decades, and it is very likely an opportunity that will never present itself again. Make no mistake, this is a singular opportunity to purchase a piece of Ferrari history."

    I WOULD EXPECT CIRCA $20 MILLION SINCE THIS CAR HAS IMPECCABLE HISTORY, WON THE TOUR DE FRANCE & OWNED BY ROYALTY, PROVENANCE AND STYLE, IMO THE MOST STYLISH SHAPE OF ALL THE 250 TDF. LOOKS GORGEOUS IN BLEU. PREVIOUS TDF PUBLIC SALES HAVE BEEN BETWEEN $5M AND $10M BUT NONE HAVE HAD THE QUALITIES OF THIS CAR.
     
  3. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    #3 Timmmmmmmmmmy, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
    2 - Ferrari 250 LM #6105 - RM Thursday. Lot 113.

    Lot description -

    "Like all other 250 LMs, chassis number 6105, the 23rd of just 32 examples constructed, was destined for the race track. The Ferrari was ordered through Maranello Concessionaires by noted privateer Ronald Fry, a descendant of the prominent Fry family, who had made their fortune through confectionaries and chocolates in England starting in the 18th century. Ronald Fry was a seasoned racer, and it was no secret that his favorite cars were those from Maranello. Fry had traded in his 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO (chassis number 3869GT), which he had campaigned quite successfully over the 1963 and 1964 seasons, and with the arrival of the 250 LM in mid-September, he was obviously quite excited to get his newest Ferrari out onto the track. The 250 LM, boasting a new mid-mounted, 3.3-liter V-12, was developed for the GT class but forced to compete as a sports prototype. This was a drastically different automobile from earlier 250-series Ferraris. Nevertheless, it proved to be highly successful on the track, exhibiting spectacular poise due to its combination of handling and horsepower, which was beautifully mastered by a number of skilled drivers lucky enough to get behind the wheel. In 1965, chassis 5893 took 1st overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, making it the last Ferrari to ever do so, cementing the car’s place in automotive history. The 250 LM is widely lauded as one of the greatest Ferraris of all time by owners, historians, and tifosi alike, and it would appear that Fry would agree. In his ownership, it was very actively campaigned on hill climbs, sprints, and club races around England for the rest of 1964 through to 1966, often placing in the top three with his weapons-grade Ferrari. Taking a 250 LM to such events was the automotive equivalent of taking a gun to a knife-fight, and the car’s results speak for themselves. Chassis number 6105 (easily recognizable thanks to its registration number, RON 54) proved to be very successful in Fry’s ownership, and he often finished 1st in class and occasionally 1st overall. During the warmer months of the year, this car would be campaigned as often as four times a month. Seemingly every possible weekend that Fry could be out on the track in his Ferrari he made his way to an event and came home with a trophy in hand.

    In December 1965, Enzo Ferrari presented Ron Fry with a medal of recognition for his outstanding achievements in racing, which is a testament to the success of both Fry and his 250 LM. More importantly, even though the car was campaigned with much frequency, Fry never had a major accident, and as a result, the car remained in exceptionally original condition. This is an important point to note, as 250 LMs in particular were raced hard and consequently many fell victim to the hardships of motorsport. Therefore, it is nearly impossible to find an example that is in such original condition, boasting such extensive competition history, as 6105. In October 1966, chassis number 6105 returned to the Earls Court Motor Show, where it was displayed by Maranello Concessionaires in celebration of its racing success. Prior to the 1967 racing season, Fry sold his 250 LM in January 1967 to David S. D. Skailes, of Staffordshire, the owner of Cropwell Bishop Creamery in Nottingham, who reregistered the car on plates BFB 932 B. Shortly after acquiring the car, Skailes had the engine overhauled by the Ferrari factory in Maranello and, at the same time, had body specialist Piero Drogo install a long nose on the car, giving it a more distinctive front end. Skailes continued to race the car at events in the UK and even campaigned the car, with Eric Liddell, at the nine-hour race at Kyalami in South Africa, placing 6th overall. In October 1968, the 250 LM was acquired through Maranello Concessionaires by its third owner, Jack Maurice of Northumberland, who traded in his 275 GTB in order to make the purchase, and re-registered the car on license plates JM 265. Much like Ron Fry before him, Maurice continued to campaign his 250 LM on hill climbs and sprints around the UK, and the car returned to many of the same venues that it raced at under Fry’s ownership. For the 1970 season, Maurice had accumulated eight class wins, placed 2nd in the Shell Leader’s Hill Climb Championship, and won the Baracca Trophy and the David Poter Trophy for his exploits on the track.

    Following the success of the 1970 season, 6105 took a brief respite from competition and was featured in a pair of articles written by Jack Maurice for the Ferrari Owners’ Club UK magazine, a five-page article in the Winter 1970–1971 issue, titled "Speed-Hillclimbing in a 250 LM", and a two page article titled "The Duchess" in Autumn 1975. Maurice had the engine rebuilt at Diena & Silingardi’s Sport Auto in Modena over the winter of 1975/1976 and sold the car in 1976. After passing through Martin Johnson, chassis number 6105 was purchased by Richard Colton, of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, and once more returned to the track under his ownership, participating in even more hill climbs and sprints around the UK. Following another four years of racing, Colton decided that his 250 LM was deserving of a restoration. To bring the car back to its original specifications, Colton purchased an original Scaglietti nose for a 250 LM from Robert Fehlmann, replacing the car’s Drogo long-nose, and had it fitted to the car during its restoration by GTC Engineering. Following the completion of the restoration, Colton showed the car at a pair of Ferrari Owners’ Club meetings in the UK, one in July at Eastington Hall and the other in September at Avisford Park. Nearly 20 years after it was delivered new to Ron Fry, in 1984, chassis number 6105 was sold to its first owner outside of the UK, Mr. Yoshiyuki Hayashi of Tokyo. Hayashi kept the car in his collection for 11 years before it was sold to another esteemed Japanese collector, Yoshiho Matsuda, who also owned a 250 GTO and 250 Testa Rossa. In Matsuda’s ownership, the car was featured in a book on his collection, titled Rosso Corsa – Matsuda Collection, as well as pictured in issue 92 of Cavallino magazine and featured in the Japanese magazine Car Graphic.

    Following a brief stint in the United States for three years with Kevin Crowder, of Dallas, Texas, the car returned to Europe and was owned by Robert Sarrailh and Andrea Burani before being purchased by Pierre Mellinger, of Lausanne, Switzerland. In his ownership, Mellinger exercised the car frequently, being driven and enjoyed by him on several European driving events. Mellinger drove the car on the Italia Classica in September 2011 from Maranello to Venice and back, as well as in the Tour Auto in April 2012. Also in 2012, chassis 6105 was driven by Mellinger at the Le Mans Classic, taking to the track for the first time in more than 30 years. Prior to this, the car received over $100,000 of work at GPS Classic in northern Italy, excluding an engine and transmission rebuild. This 250 LM was sold to its current custodian later that year, as part of The Pinnacle Portfolio, and while in this collection, it has been beautifully preserved alongside other highly significant Ferraris. From the moment one first sets eyes on it, the sheer level of character and originality is instantly palatable. Although exhibiting slight signs of use from its more recent outings, it is evident that this is a very well-preserved and original example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated racing cars. The car’s Ferrari Classiche certification only further confirms that it retains all of its original mechanical components. Additionally, it is offered with a spare, un-numbered 128 F-type engine, as well as an additional crankshaft and a set of Borrani wire wheels on Dunlop tires. Of course, the factory-correct appearance of its Scaglietti nose makes it all the more appealing. The opportunity to purchase a 250 LM at auction is a rare occurrence, but the opportunity to purchase a pure example with known history from new is an unrepeatable opportunity. As one of the finest and most original examples of the last Ferrari to win overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the importance of the 250 LM as a model, and chassis number 6105 in particular, simply cannot be understated."

    THIS 250LM HAS IMPECCABLE PROVENANCE, A SUCCESSFUL IF MINOR COMPETITION HISTORY AND ABOVE ALL HAS NEVER BEEN SPLIT INTO TWO NOR FULLY WRECKED. THE LAST FEW COMPARABLES WERE EITHER CARS WITH FLAWED PROVENANCE OR NO COMPETITION HISTORY AND STILL SOLD FOR 9 - 13 MILLION USD. MM POINTED OUT IN ANOTHER THREAD THAT THIS CAR SOLD IN 2012 IT WENT FOR 11 MILLION BUT NOW THIS COULD EASILY GO FOR NEARLY 20 MILLION, MAYBE 18 TO BE EXACT.
     
  4. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    #4 Timmmmmmmmmmy, Jul 27, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
    3 - 1960 Ferrari 250 GT Short Wheelbase Competizione #1773gt - RM. Thursday. Lot 125.

    Lot description

    "Chassis number 1773GT was constructed by the factory in March 1960 as the eighth of about forty-five aluminum-bodied competition 250 SWB Berlinettas for that year, and it boasts a remarkable history that stands proud amongst the many successes for the 250 SWB Berlinetta as a model. By 1959, Ferrari was a well-respected force in international motorsport. In the GT class, the company was second to none, and its 250 GT long-wheelbase Berlinetta was considered by many to be the finest dual-purpose GT car ever built. Ferrari introduced that car’s replacement at the 1959 Paris Salon, and while it appeared similar to the outgoing “Tour de France” in many ways, it boasted a number of updates, including a new chassis with a wheelbase 20 centimeters shorter than its predecessor, a new Tipo 168 engine producing 280 horsepower in competition specification, and disc brakes, with the latter being a first for Ferrari. Customers could order their new 250 GT Berlinetta in either right- or left-hand drive, specify an uprated competition engine, and add other custom touches to further personalize their cars. Of course, the most desirable examples were those built for competition, leading Ferrari to more victories in motorsport, and the 250 GT SWB presented here is one such example. Chassis number 1773GT was built to competition specifications fitted with not only aluminum bodywork but also a factory roll bar. A number of features were absent from the car, including side vent windows, fender vents, rain gutters over the doors, side indicators on the front fenders, an indentation for the trunk on the license plate, a vent over the rearview window, and finally, a glove compartment. The car was completed by the factory on March 16, 1960. Just nine days later, the Ferrari made its way to sunny Florida, where it was preparing to compete at the ninth annual 12 Hours of Sebring. The car was delivered through Luigi Chinetti to legendary racing figure George Arents, who entered it in the race, along with famous gentleman driver Bill Kimberly as co-driver, under the banner of Chinetti’s North American Racing Team. Bill Kimberly was heir to the Kimberly-Clark paper fortune, and quite interestingly, 1773GT was photographed for this catalogue in Wisconsin, in and around the Kimberly-Clark factories. It proved to be a good year for the 250 SWB at Sebring, as Arents and Kimberly finished a highly impressive 7th overall and 5th in class, with another NART-entered 250 SWB, driven by Ed Hugus and Brewing-heir Augie Pabst (chassis number 1785GT), placing 4th and 2nd in class. The 250 SWB (1539GT) of Bill Sturgis and Fritz D’Orey finished 6th overall. This would be the sole occasion that Arents raced his 250 SWB. The following month, it was sold to another well-known American enthusiast, Robert M. Grossman of Nyack, New Jersey.

    Grossman’s first race was the SCCA National GT race at Bridgehampton, New York, on May 30 and 31, and he took 1st overall. The car even appeared on the cover of the October 1960 issue of Sports Cars Illustrated magazine before its next series of races at the Bahamas Speed Week. In his first race at Nassau in the Nassau Tourist Trophy, Grossman and 1773GT finished 2nd overall, behind another 250 SWB, which was driven by none other than Stirling Moss. Grossman returned for the Governor’s Trophy on December 3, finishing 11th overall and 4th in class. The next day, Grossman and his Ferrari placed 11th overall and 1st in class in the open race of the Nassau Trophy. Chassis number 1773GT was sold to its third owner, Bob Hathaway of Rhode Island, in early 1961. Hathaway found similar success as Arents. It was raced at a handful of SCCA events in the U.S. Northeast and even in a race at Mosport in Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada, placing 1st overall. Chassis 1773GT then returned to Nassau in 1961, placing 4th overall and 3rd in class in the over 1,500-cubic centimeter GT class race on December 3 and 3rd overall and 3rd in class at the Nassau Tourist Trophy the same day. In the Governor’s Trophy on December 8, Hathaway placed 7th overall and 5th in class. In 1962, the Ferrari was purchased by Walter Luftman, of Rye, New York, and later passed to Jim Hunt, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. In 1966, it was then acquired by Adrian Pothus, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, remaining in his tenure for 10 years before it was purchased by Joseph William Moch, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, in March 1979. Chassis number 1773GT then passed to Anthony Mudd in 1983, before it was exported overseas to Jean-Jacques Bally, of Vence, France, and later Rinnie Van Der Velden, of Holland, in June 1987. While in Mr. Van Der Velden’s ownership, a new front clip was installed by Alwin Hietbrink Coachworks, but it is important to note that the car retained the remainder of its original Scaglietti aluminum coachwork. In February 1994, the car was sold to Tony Smith in the United Kingdom, who commissioned David Cottingham’s DK Engineering to perform a full restoration, with engine work being performed by Bob Houghton.

    Following the completion of its restoration, the car was sold to Andre Ahrle, of Bonn, Germany, in 1996 and was purchased by a prominent collector in the Pacific Northwest in 1999. This 250 GT SWB was then displayed at the eighth annual Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2003, and four years later, it was purchased by John Romano, of Connecticut. The car was exercised by Romano in June 2007 at the Ferrari Historic Challenge Series at Mont Tremblant and later shown by him at the Cavallino Classic in 2010. Chassis number 1773GT also received a color feature in the May 2013 issue of Ferrari World magazine. After being acquired by The Pinnacle Portfolio, chassis number 1773GT was immediately shipped to Wayne Obry’s esteemed Motion Products Inc. in Neenah, Wisconsin, for a complete restoration back to its 1960 Sebring livery. The owner’s directive was simple: he wanted a restoration beyond reproach that could compete at the highest level of concours judging and would be capable of handily winning awards wherever shown. Mr. Obry’s firm was chosen specifically on the advice of countless collectors who were consulted on this project and who believed that a Ferrari of this caliber should be sent to Motion Products. Though the car was already an excellent example, the project was carried out with a near-fanatical level of detail. It received new yellow paintwork and a new green interior, as per its original specifications. The engine was fully rebuilt, and during restoration, Motion Products was able to confirm that the car is still retaining all of its original mechanical components, including the engine, transmission, and rear axle. Additionally, no evidence of accident damage was found during the restoration, confirming the purity and exceptional quality of chassis number 1773GT and placing it amongst the upper echelon of all 250 GT SWB Berlinettas. All told, this was a top-to-bottom, full nut-and-bolt restoration. The attractiveness of 1773GT is truly two-fold. On the one hand, its provenance is graced with such illustrious names as Grossman and Kimberly, and on the other hand, its condition remains mechanically pure and enjoys a restoration of the highest caliber. But perhaps most importantly, despite all the effort and care lavished on this car, it has not been presented publically since restoration, and the new owner has the opportunity to show the car at such distinguished events as the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. It is, without exaggeration, an opportunity not to be overlooked!"

    THE BEST EXAMPLE OF THIS MUCH SOUGHT AFTER MODEL TO COME UP FOR PUBLIC SALE IN THE PAST FEW YEARS. GREAT EXAMPLE THAT HASN'T BEEN CRASHED REPLETE WITH A MOTION PRODUCTS RESTORATION IN GREAT COLOURS. THE CAR WAS DRIVEN BY ARENTS & KIMBERLY TO 7TH AT SEBRING IN 1960 SO NO LACK OF HISTORY. 20 MILLION COULD BE A STRETCH BUT I WOULD'NT BE SURPRISED TO SEE IT GO EVEN HIGHER.
     
  5. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    4 - 1959 Ferrari 250GT Interim Berlinetta #1519GT. Bonhams. Friday. Lot 56.

    Lot description -

    "Chassis no. 1519 GT is the fifth of the seven 1959 'interim' LWB Berlinettas that featured SWB-style coachwork mounted on the traditional 2,600mm wheelbase. On July 31, 1959, the Maranello factory sent this chassis to Scaglietti to receive lightweight Berlinetta coachwork, and a week later the Berlinetta was sold to the nickel company Soconemet S.A. on behalf of Jean-Pierre Schild, a founding member of the Ecurie La Meute, one of Switzerland's earliest racing teams. Schild had raced Alfa Romeos through 1956 and 1957, achieving a first-overall finish at the Coupes du Salon at the Circuit de Linas-Montlhéry in October 1957. By mid-1958, he had acquired a 250 GT, which he drove to a 2nd-place finish at that year's Coupes du Salon. Even after acquiring a 3-louver TdF (0747 GT) in late 1958, Mr. Schild still sought greater performance, and his new LWB alloy Berlinetta was officially completed by the factory on September 16, 1958, just two days before its racing debut. On September 18, Schild and Roger de la Geneste entered 1519 GT in the Tour de France decorated with #161, as one of about fifteen 250 GT TdF examples in attendance, and one of three interim Berlinettas. After the grueling six days of sprints, hillclimbs, and circuit laps (including Le Mans), the Berlinetta placed an impressive 3rd overall, finishing behind only the two TdF's of the Ecurie Francorchamps, the first of which was driven by two-time reigning Tour de France champion Olivier Gendebien. A month later, Schild reprised his regular appearance at the Coupes du Salon, driving 1519 GT to 1st place in the GT class. In March 1960, the 250 GT returned to the Maranello factory to receive some upgrades intended to keep it competitive. Most significantly, these measures including fitting Dunlop disc brakes all around. Following these official factory conversions, the car was exported in April to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York, and in turn sold to John Bunch of New Canaan, Connecticut.
    Fitted with a black rollbar and registered with tags reading "20-769," the 250 GT Competizione was campaigned on Bunch's behalf by Dean McCarthy of Syracuse in numerous SCCA events over the course of the 1960 season, including races at Cumberland, Marlboro, Lime Rock, Bridgehampton, and Watkins Glen. Highlights of the season included 2nd-place finishes at Thompson and Montgomery, with a 1st-overall victory at the Glen Classic at Watkins Glen in June. After 1960 there is little record of any SCCA use for 1519 GT, and the car was soon purchased by the well-known Ferrari privateer and dealer Bob Grossman. Following a minor accident, though, Grossman removed the original engine, transmission and sold the car to William Denger of New York, who stored it for many years.

    In the mid-1970s, 1519 GT was acquired by John Damron of Ottawa, Illinois, a nuclear scientist, and he similarly kept the car safely domiciled for many years. In 1972, an esteemed Connecticut-based collector of important vintage Ferraris, entered the story of 1519 GT when he purchased a 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, chassis no. 2237 GT. Installed in the car was 1519 GT's original V-12 motor, as removed by Bob Grossman. Though he did not retain possession of the SWB, itself, for more than five years, he did recognize the significance of the unusual tipo 128 DF motor, which he put away for safe keeping and eventually sold it to Mr. Damron. In 2011, the alloy Berlinetta became available when offered by Mr. Damron, who had owned it for over 30 years. The previously mentioned Greenwich-based Ferrari collector agreed to buy the car from Mr. Damron, and set about a complete restoration of the complete body, chassis and original engine. Italian specialists Diena & Silingardi were commissioned to rebuild all the running gear and the original motor, Tappezzeria Luppi re-trimmed the interior, while Carrozzeria Autosport Bacchelli & Villa (the renowned restoration house founded by former employees of Drogo and Scaglietti) restored the coachwork, finishing the exterior in the Ecurie la Meute's Swiss livery of red with a central white stripe. As their reputations would suggest, the work of these old-school Modenese craftsmen resulted in exquisite detail and artful execution. Following completion of the two-year restoration in 2014, the car was authenticated by the Maranello factory with the desirable Ferrari Classiche Red Book. As noted by the Red Book, all major components in the car remain original, including the engine, body, suspension, and brakes. The lone exception to complete originality is the gearbox, which is the correct tipo 508 C, though the unit is not original to chassis 1519 GT. Bolstered by the breathtaking, handcrafted restoration and the assurance of factory-backed authenticity, 1519 GT was presented at the Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este in May 2014. It subsequently ran the hill climb at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in June 2014, and in Brandon Wang's "Le 250 Tornano a Casa" tour in France and Italy later that month. In January 2015, the Berlinetta was presented at the 24th Annual Palm Beach Cavallino Classic, where it won a Platinum Award and took home the Excellence Cup 2 for best restoration. At the Mar-a-Lago Concours d'Elegance held during the same weekend, the car won an Excellence in Class Cup, while four months later the Berlinetta garnered the Best Ferrari award at the Greenwich Concours d'Elegance, rounding out a very impressive list of exhibition accolades. Still displaying the benefits of its immaculate restoration, chassis no. 1519 GT is an extremely rare and historically important competition Ferrari. Not only does the car represent a fascinating design transition to the more widely produced 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, but it exemplifies the competition success of the early 250 GT Berlinettas at the Tour de France Auto, where the model performed so well that it became synonymous with the race. This unique and race-pedigreed 250 GT Competizione Alloy Berlinetta would constitute a crowning addition to any postwar sports car collection, and should particularly attract the interest of Ferrari connoisseurs and sports car racing aficionados."

    BONHAMS STAR LOT THIS YEAR, AN EXTREMELY RARE INTERIM 250 GT WITH A GOOD LOOK, A GREAT HISTORY, GOOD PROVENANCE, 3RD AT THE 1959 TOUR DE FRANCE AND FRESH FROM STELLAR OWNERSHIP AND A FERRARI CLASSICHE RESTORATION. ONLY DISCOUNTED BY A CERTAIN AWKWARDNESS IN THE OVERALL DIMENSIONS FROM THE STRETCHED PLATFORM..... 10 MILLION EASY. GO FIND ANOTHER.
     
  6. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    5 - Ferrari 250GT Short Wheelbase Bertone Coupe #3269gt - Gooding. Saturday. Lot 039. Estimate 14 million+ USD.

    Lot description -

    "In early 1962, Nuccio purchased a complete 250 GT SWB chassis from Maranello, numbered 3269 GT, and laid out his vision for a spectacular new Ferrari that he would retain for his personal use. Prior to this purchase, Carrozzeria Bertone had fashioned coachwork for just two Ferraris, a 1950 166 Inter Cabriolet built for Franco Cornacchia’s dealership and a 1959 250 GT SWB Coupe commissioned by wealthy industrialist Enrico Wax. To execute the design of the new Ferrari, Nuccio turned to Giugiaro, a young stylist who had joined the coachbuilder in 1959 and whose first task was to update the popular Giulietta Sprint. Though he would go on to become one of the most talented and influential designers of the postwar era, the 23-year-old Giugiaro had penned only a handful of cars by 1962. Nevertheless, his Aston Martin DB4 GT Jet and a one-off Maserati 5000 GT showcased his remarkable ability to make already outstanding sports cars even more desirable. Working together, Nuccio Bertone and Giorgetto Giugiaro created one of Carrozzeria Bertone’s most famous designs and, quite possibly, the most memorable coachbuilt Ferrari of all time. Inspired by Ferrari’s world-championship-winning Grand Prix car, the 156 F1, as well as the 330 TRI LM and 246 SP sports racing cars, the signature feature of Giugiaro’s design was its “sharknose” front-end treatment. Similar to Franco Scaglione’s BAT cars, the leading edge of the bonnet came together in an expressive point, splitting the traditional Ferrari eggcrate grille into two large ovoid openings. Consistent with the sharknose theme, the bodywork featured several competition-inspired cues, including a Plexiglas bug deflector, a wide hood scoop, drilled rocker trim, and a small trail of louvers following the line created by the rear quarter windows. As in the standard design, the Bertone 250 SWB had extractor vents on the front and rear fenders. While Pinin Farina’s vents were purely functional vertically oriented slashes, Bertone’s were horizontally oriented, oval shaped, and trimmed with decorative slats. Viewed from any angle, the sharknose 250 SWB was an absolutely gorgeous automobile, with voluptuous forms, beautiful flowing lines, and compact, aggressive proportions. The interior was pure Bertone and far more luxurious than the standard road-going SWB berlinettas, with comfortable leather-trimmed seats, electric windows, and stylish quilted vinyl covering the transmission tunnel, footwells, and sills. The metal dashboard – painted to match the body color – was outfitted with the full array of black-faced Veglia gauges, knobs, and switches, along with a locking glove box and a deluxe radio. Even the steering wheel, with its special black Bakelite rim, was unique to 3269 GT. Finished in Blu Notte Metallizzato with burgundy leather upholstery, the spectacular coachwork was finished off by a standard Ferrari badge on the upper edge of the nose, a large prancing horse below it, and the classic Bertone badge placed on each front fender, highlighted by a decorative chrome flash.

    A prime example of the coachbuilder’s art, this marvelous creation showcased the incredible attention to detail, quality construction, and Old World craftsmanship typical of Carrozzeria Bertone. Nuccio Bertone was obviously very proud of his Berlinetta Speciale, and he introduced it at the prestigious Geneva Auto Show, held in Plainpalais March 15–25, 1962. The unique Bertone Ferrari – the perfect marriage of a 250 GT SWB chassis and a stylish Giugiaro-designed body – must have caused quite a stir. After all, here was the finest Italian sports car presented in a bold and completely original way, yet retaining the fundamental Ferrari character and sharing exotic styling cues with the Scuderia’s latest racing cars. After the debut at Geneva, Carrozzeria Bertone displayed the Ferrari at the annual carrozzerie exhibition at the famed Biscaretti Museum in Torino. In this exclusive gathering of the latest coachbuilt cars, the Berlinetta Speciale was showcased alongside Pinin Farina’s Superfast III, a Touring-bodied Maserati 3500 GT, and a Dual-Ghia L6.4. Auto Italiana covered the event and its correspondents remarked that cars like the Bertone Ferrari reconfirmed the current trend for rounder, more curvaceous designs, replacing the boxy, conservative styles that had been in vogue throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s. In May, the certificate of origin was issued for 3269 GT, and the car underwent a variety of revisions at the request of Nuccio. For instance, the body was refinished in metallic silver gray, the Bertone badge was standardized, and the large prancing horse was removed from the lower edge of the nose while a smaller one was secured to the driver’s side grille. In this updated form, 3269 GT was displayed as the centerpiece of the Bertone stand at the Torino Auto Show in November 1962, surrounded by contemporary production cars, such as the Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint and the new ASA 1000 GT. Despite all the accolades Nuccio’s Berlinetta Speciale received during its tour of the motor show circuit, Enzo Ferrari never formally acknowledged the car that had so beautifully re-imagined his classic 250 GT SWB. In a rare attempt to communicate with Il Commendatore, Nuccio sent him a Christmas gift in 1962 and was surely pleased to receive the following reply: “Dear Bertone, your gift and words are the unmistakable signs of a man that is gripped by the same passion that has led me to where I am today. My heartfelt thanks. Your – if you permit me – friend, Enzo Ferrari.” On March 9, 1963, Nuccio sold the Berlinetta Speciale to Milanese automotive parts supplier Italo Musico. The car’s next owner, Gerda Anna Speckenheuer, sold it on December 30, 1966, to M. Gastone Crepaldi, the official Ferrari dealer in Milano. From there, it was sold in a package of cars to Peter Civati, a Ferrari enthusiast living in Redondo Beach, California. In 1967, Mr. Civati sold the Bertone-bodied Ferrari to Bill Karp, a drummer living in Hollywood, California. Two years later, the distinctive Ferrari made a brief cameo in Marlowe, a neo-noir film starring James Garner as Raymond Chandler’s famous detective character Philip Marlowe. Though its big-screen appearance was brief, 3269 GT is easily spotted, still finished in silver but wearing black California plates. Mr. Karp enjoyed the one-off SWB as his sole method of transportation throughout his 13-year ownership, driving it nearly 100,000 miles and even using it to transport his drum kit between gigs at music clubs and studio sessions. He retained 3269 GT until September 1980, when it was sold through Ed Niles to famed collector Lorenzo Zambrano of Monterrey, Mexico. First restored by Steve Tillack in the 1980s and then by Bob Smith Coachworks in the 1990s, the Bertone sharknose SWB has received numerous awards at concours d’elegance around the world, including several Best of Show honors. Perhaps even more significant than these accolades is the car’s remarkably genuine character, which was officially recognized in June 2007, when 3269 GT was certified by the Ferrari Classiche Department. According to the Ferrari factory, this unique 250 GT retains its original chassis, body, engine, gearbox, and differential, as well as other important components. For the past 35 years, this extraordinary Ferrari has been the crown jewel in Mr. Zambrano’s famous stable, one of the most impressive private collections of postwar Italian sports cars ever assembled. During this period, this exceptional car has been featured in countless books and articles on Ferrari, Nuccio Bertone, and Giorgetto Giugiaro, and yet it remains as fresh and exciting today as it did upon its debut at the Geneva Auto Show in 1962. Leading Ferrari experts have professed their admiration for this sharknose SWB’s striking design, and many top collectors have attempted to acquire it, but it has remained elusive, jealously guarded by its passionate long-term owner and wholly unavailable for more than 30 years. A one-of-a-kind 250 GT SWB, designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro for the personal use of Nuccio Bertone, one of the most successful and influential Italian coachbuilders, 3269 GT is a world-class Ferrari that possesses every special quality sought after by discerning collectors. Gooding & Company is proud to present this magnificent automobile – surely among the most important and distinctive Ferraris ever built – at public auction for the first time in its history."

    CERTAINLY UNIQUE, UNDOUBTABLY BEAUTIFUL, PERFECTLY RESTORED BY BOB SMITH AND ABSOLUTELY ORIGINAL. RM SOLD THE OTHER BERTONE SWB BACK IN 2013 FOR 7 MILLION USD AND THIS CAR IS MUCH BETTER LOOKING ALTHOUGH IT IS HARD TO SEE IT BEING WORTH DOUBLE THE AMOUNT. $14 - 15 MILLION SOUNDS ABOUT RIGHT.
     
  7. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    6 - Ferrari 275S/ 340 America Scaglietti Barchetta #0030MT - RM. Friday. Lot 217.

    Lot description -

    "THE 275S AND THE 1950 MILLE MIGLIA

    Calling chassis number 0030 MT simply rare and significant would be an incredible understatement, as this very car, born as one of only two 275S Barchettas ever built, became the first Lampredi-engined Ferrari sports racer. Originally fitted with coachwork by Touring and a 3.3-liter V-12, both examples built would immediately be put to the test by the factory, as their first competitive outing would be at the 1950 Mille Miglia.

    According to an article published in issue 109 of The Prancing Horse, Ferrari invited Alberto Ascari and Luigi Villoresi, the factory drivers for that year’s Mille Miglia, to Maranello to test the new 275S just days prior to the race. Ascari would get behind the wheel of chassis number 0030 MT with Senesio Nicolini as navigator for the famed Italian road race. Unfortunately, despite their driver’s best efforts, both chassis number 0030 MT and its sister car, 0032 MT, would not finish the race due to rear axle failures on both cars.

    Following the Mille Miglia, chassis number 0030 MT returned to Maranello, where it was upgraded with a newer 4.1-liter 340 America V-12 engine sourced from one of Ferrari’s Formula One cars. During this time, the car was also shown at the 1950 Salon de l'Automobile at the Grand Palais in Paris. The next year, chassis number 0030 MT was purchased by Scuderia Marzotto, who continued to race the Ferrari throughout Italy.

    The car competed with Scuderia Marzotto in a number of events, including twice more at the Mille Miglia in 1951 and 1952, as well as the Targa Florio in 1951 and the sports car race at the 1952 Monaco Grand Prix. During this time, Giovanni Bracco and Gianni Marzotto, a pair of well-known Italian racing drivers, were lucky enough to get behind the wheel on a handful of occasions at events throughout their home country.

    At the end of its formal racing career, chassis number 0030 MT’s original Touring bodywork had been replaced with a body crafted by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. According to Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the car would remain in Italy until 1958, passing through four subsequent owners until that year, when it was purchased by Carroll Mills, a serviceman living in Europe, from Vincenzo Sorrentino, of Naples, Italy, in a trade for a Maserati plus cash. Mills then imported it to the United States and stored the car at Zumbach Motors in New York City before moving it to his home in rural Vermont sometime prior to 1961.

    A BARN, A BOY, AND A FERRARI

    At just 12 years old, Peter Markowski, a neighbor of Mills' in West Rutland, Vermont, was a burgeoning sports car enthusiast, and he heard of an older gentleman nearby his home who had a barn full of old cars. Curious about the cars, Markowski did what any other enthusiast at that age without a driver’s license would do: he got on his tractor and went to go have a look for himself, finding that the rumors were true. Mills’ barn was full of cars of all different types, including an Alfa Romeo 6C 2500, an Austin Healey 100-6, and even a handful of Packards, in addition to the 275S/340.

    Even though there were so many incredible cars in the barn, it was the red Ferrari that captured young Peter’s heart. He built a friendship with Mills that led to the pair eventually striking an agreement. Mills would allow Markowski to purchase the Ferrari for $500 if he would get the other cars in the barn back on the road. Three years later, at the age of 15, the Packards were running and Peter Markowski owned a Ferrari.

    It was obvious that the Ferrari nonetheless required lots of work, and at that time, the easy thing to do would be to remove the complicated Lampredi engine and fit an American-built V-8 in its place. Luckily for Peter (and chassis number 0030 MT), he was working on a 250 GTO, owned at the time by Dr. Richard Cardozo. Cardozo convinced him that it would be worth keeping the original engine, as it was an important part of the car’s history. In order to get that engine up and running, Markowski struck a deal with Luigi Chinetti to categorize their warehouse, and in return, he would be allowed to take the parts he needed for his car. What Markowski couldn’t find in the warehouse, he produced for himself.

    Needless to say, through completely rebuilding chassis number 0030 MT, Markowski developed a unique understanding of the car and was able to further hone his mechanical skills by working on other Ferraris at the time. Markowski got the car running again at the age of 21, and from there, as he says, “I drove the wheels off it!”

    During a recent conversation with RM Sotheby’s Research Department, it was clear that Markowski adored chassis number 0030 MT over his 40 years of ownership. “I figure I drove it over 110,000 miles over the time I owned it. We drove it to Lime Rock, Watkins Glen, and Mosport. We drove it in California, Ohio, Florida; we drove it all over the country!”

    Not only did Markowski drive and race his 275S/340 on a frequent basis, but he also continued to maintain and service it as necessary. As the car required maintenance to keep it the road, Markowski personally ensured that it was always in running condition throughout his ownership. Much as when he initially restored the car, anything that was not available was produced or adapted from existing Ferrari parts to keep the car on the road.

    Not only did his restoration of chassis number 0030 MT gift Markowski with an incredible automobile, but his work with Cardozo’s GTO and Mills’ cars, in addition to his own Ferrari, helped him launch a restoration business of his own, Restoration & Performance Motorcars, of Vergennes, Vermont.

    The car became a frequent sight with Markowski, not only on the roads around his home state of Vermont but also at numerous Ferrari Club of America events across the country, both on the track and on the concours lawn. It appeared at annual meetings across the country, from as close as Watkins Glen and as far away as Monterey, California.

    RETURN TO EUROPE AND THE MILLE MIGLIA

    Peter Markowski finally sold his beloved Ferrari in 1999 to respected collector William B. Jacobs, of Joliet, Illinois. The car remained in the United States for only a short while, and in 2003, chassis number 0030 MT was purchased by Michael Willms, of Aachen, Germany. Willms planned to use his new Ferrari exactly as Enzo would have intended, and his very first event with the car, the 2005 Mille Miglia, brought the 275S/340 back to its roots. Fifty-five years after it had rocketed through the very same Italian streets, chassis number 0030 MT was back reliving its glory days alongside a handful of vehicles that would have shared the same experience with it.

    After completing the Mille Miglia, Willms continued to drive the car at events around Europe in 2005, including Uwe Meissner’s 12th Modena Motorsport Track Days at the Nürburgring and the Shell Historic Ferrari Maserati Challenge World Finals at Mugello. The car also received a color feature in the German magazine Auto, Motor & Sport. The next year brought the car back to a similar series of events, including the Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge events at Valencia, Spa-Francorchamps, and Monza, in addition to the 2006 Mille Miglia. Chassis number 0030 MT returned to the Mille Miglia in 2007, followed by an appearance at the Monaco Historic Grand Prix in 2008, and it returned yet again to the Mille Miglia in 2010. The car has also been granted the Ferrari Classiche attestation for competition cars, certifying that although the car does not comply with the Classiche department’s normal criteria for issuing certification, it has been deemed a vehicle of historic interest due to its competition history and importance in the history of the marque.

    TODAY

    Purchased by its current collector from Willms, chassis number 0030 MT remains in wonderful condition and is ready to enjoy on the world’s most exclusive motoring events. Sitting in the driver’s seat, the historical importance and sheer character of chassis number 0030 MT is instantly palatable at first glance. Turn on the fuel pumps, turn the key for ignition, press the starter, and the 4.1-liter Lampredi V-12 instantly fires to life. Throttle response is immediate, and the power and torque available from the engine is infectious. At full tilt, the engine produces the most glorious noise, one that any enthusiast would never tire of, even while winding through 1,000 miles of Italy’s best roads.

    The sale of chassis number 0030 MT presents an unparalleled opportunity to acquire and enjoy one of Ferrari’s earliest racers, one that was bred during what many consider to be the Golden Era of motorsport, when it was raced by such legends as Alberto Ascari, Giovanni Bracco, and Gianni Marzotto. As one of only two examples of its kind ever built, the lucky winning bidder will not only gain an extremely rare automobile but also a highly significant Works Ferrari, boasting Mille Miglia and Targa Florio history and eligibility for some of the most exciting and selective historic events on the planet.

    Perhaps its longest custodian describes it best: “The sound was like nothing else; it was magic. It just sings the most incredible song…it’s a delight.”'

    AN ASTONISHING CAR THAT IS HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT THAT HAS BEEN WELL KEPT AND IS AUTHENTIC AS RACED. PERHAPS NOT AS USABLE AS LATER FERRARI'S MORE THAN MADE UP BY IT'S HISTORY. WOULD BE PERFECT FOR THE MILLE MIGLIA. 8 - 9 MILLION WILL BE ABOUT RIGHT.
     
  8. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    7 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type Lightweight #XKC052. RM. Friday. Lot 237. Estimate $9 million+.

    Lot description -

    " Chassis XKC 052 is the second of those three lightweight Works examples that were prepared specifically for the 1953 running of Le Mans. These cars constituted the final examples of the mighty C-Type (a last development car wore a D-Type-style body) and featured a number of upgrades over the prior examples. Improvements included new thin-gauge aluminum coachwork, more powerful Weber carburetors, a fully synchronized gearbox and triple-plate clutch, an additional upper link to the rear axle, and a rubber aircraft fuel bladder, amongst other lighter, weight-saving components. Most importantly, the three cars were the only lightweight C-Types built by the factory and were the first disc-brake-equipped entrants to ever run Le Mans, being the only cars so outfitted among the 1953 field. This distinction proved to be quite significant in the race’s outcome.

    On February 12, 1953, chassis number XKC 052 was tested by Norman Dewis in preparation for the upcoming race. Wearing #19, the C-Type was entered with its two sister cars (XKC 051 and XKC 053) during the Le Mans weekend of June 13, 1953, piloted by Peter Whitehead and Ian Stewart. As the sun set on the first day of competition, Jaguar, Ferrari, and Alfa Romeo appeared to be the teams to beat. The Jaguar drivers soldiered on through the night, certainly battered but not to be defeated. With the rigors of endurance racing taking their toll, only one of the three Ferraris remained by daybreak, while all three Alfas retired early.

    The C-Types, essentially unmatchable through the curves with their low weight and disc brakes, continued to set the race-leading pace, with 051 and 053 in 1st and 2nd place, respectively, and 052 only a few laps behind in 4th. The Jaguars continued to run strong, fighting through the fatigue and exhaustion, and by the 24th hour, this order remained, with Briggs Cunningham’s C5-R preserving 3rd place to stave off a 1-2-3 sweep by the Coventry team. With Ian Stewart concluding driving duties at the end of the grueling 24 hours, XKC 052 completed 297 laps with an average speed of almost 167 km/h.

    Following this smashing success, XKC 052 continued its factory competition campaign, with appearances at Silverstone and Goodwood, but mechanical issues resulted in two DNFs. By the end of the 1953 season, Coventry was beginning development of its next sports-racing model (soon to be known as the D-Type) for the following year’s Le Mans, as the company was far more interested in competing at Sarthe than other venues or series. Consequently, in November 1953, chassis number 052 was prepared for private sale with a rebuild to Le Mans specifications and was sold to the famed Ecurie Ecosse.

    On December 12, 1953, the Scotland-based scuderia registered the Jaguar with tags reading LFS 672. Painted the Ecurie’s signature color of Flag Metallic Blue, XKC 052 was mostly driven by Jimmy Stewart, older brother of famed Jackie, through May 1954, finishing 1st three times at Goodwood and once at National Ibsley. In early June, future Le Mans winner Roy Salvadori took over for Stewart, winning two events at Snetterton on June 5 before Stewart returned to finish 1st at Goodwood two days later. Ninian Sanderson then became the car’s principal driver for the next month, taking 2nd place at National Oulton Park on June 12 and at the National Charterhall race on July 11. Salvadori claimed another checkered flag at National Charterhall on September 4, following it up with a 2nd place finish at the Penya-Rhin Grand Prix on October 10. In total, XKC 052 netted Ecurie Ecosse eight victories during 1954, with four 2nd place finishes, four 3rd place finishes, and three 4th place finishes, which is a remarkable overall record for a single season.

    In the October 22, 1954, issue of Autosport magazine, the Ecurie Ecosse advertised all three of its 1954 team cars for sale, and XKC 052 was soon thereafter purchased by well-known privateer Peter Blond. Repainting the C-Type green, Mr. Blond used the car for club racing throughout 1956, finishing 2nd at Goodwood in March 1955 and 5th at the Spa Grand Prix in May, with Hans Davids at the wheel. Three 4th place finishes at the Goodwood International, BARC Goodwood, and the Crystal Palace International rounded out the 1955 season. The following March, Mr. Blond improved upon his BARC performance with a 3rd place finish at the Goodwood event.

    By mid-April 1956, XKC 052 passed to Maurice Charles, who continued the car’s racing endeavors with appearances at Goodwood and the Aintree 100 and a 5th place finish at Brands Hatch on August 6. Mr. Charles offered the car for sale in October, and it was soon after purchased by Jim Robinson, of Northampton, who ran the car twice at the Evesham sprints, finishing as high as 2nd in class. The owner advertised the car twice in Autosport during 1957, eventually selling the C-Type to Alan Ensoll later that year.

    Mr. Ensoll somewhat renewed the car’s competition relevance with some stronger driving in various hill climbs and sprints, taking 3rd place at Charterhall in May 1958 and 1st in class at Barbon Hill and Yorkshire. Second place finishes were achieved at Charterhall and Catterick Camp, with an all-out victory earned at the Castlewick Hill Climb in June.

    In September 1958, Mr. Ensoll sold the Jaguar to Tom Candlish, and it remained competitive with a 4th place result at Charterhall and 1st overall finishes at the Rest-and-Be-Thankful Hill Climb Championship and the unlimited GT race at Charterhall in July 1959. During an outing around this time, XKC 052 was involved in a moderate accident, and in late 1959, the important race car was sold to Ian Denney, who completely restored it, including a new lightweight body. After passing in 1969 to Brian Classic, the car was acquired in 1970 by Paul Grist, who cosmetically returned it to its former Ecurie Ecosse livery.

    XKC 052: ON THE ROAD

    In 1971, the C-Type found a more permanent home when it was purchased by the esteemed Martin Morris, one of Britain’s more astute collectors of the period. The car remained in the Morris family’s purview for over 30 years, finally reaching the status of rare collectible. In one of the C-Type’s final period outings, Stephen Curtis ran it at the Le Mans 50th Anniversary event on June 9, 1973, finishing a commendable 11th place.

    In 1986, Mr. Morris commissioned a comprehensive two-year restoration of XKC 052 that was publicly enjoyed a few years later with the car’s participation in the Jaguar factory's Cavalcades to Le Mans in 1991 and 1993. In 2000, Morris’s son assumed control of the C-Type’s care, and he soon sold the car into American ownership for the first time in its existence. XKC 052 was purchased then by the consignor, one of the world’s foremost collectors of important vintage sports cars and a regular exhibitor at premium concours d’elegance, including Pebble Beach.

    The consignor’s first order of business was a proper renewal to 1953 Le Mans specifications, which he entrusted to John Pearson, of the United Kingdom. The C-Type was completely mechanically refreshed and mounted with new, completely accurate, lightweight thin-gauge aluminum coachwork built by RS Panels to the factory-correct thickness. This is typical of these types of race cars, as they saw a great number of years of competition; the lightweight aluminum bodies were never intended to outlast their racing careers. The body was finished in the Ecurie Ecosse livery, with a fresh coat of the famous blue paint and decorated with #19 roundels. The 1959 replacement body has been retained for the car’s overall historical record and completeness.

    Following the completion of Mr. Pearson’s exacting work, the consignor began to enjoy the Jaguar on various rallies and tours, starting with the factory's C-Type Cavalcade to Le Mans in June 2001. XKC 052 was also featured on the cover of the December 2001 issue of Classic Jaguar World magazine. In August 2002, the car was exhibited at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as a display-only, non-judged entry; while in April 2005, it participated in the California Mille. Four months later, the C-Type drove the prestigious Quail Rally, staged in conjunction with the Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley, California. Furthermore, XKC 052 is eligible for just about any of the most prestigious and exciting events the world over.

    Enjoying climate-controlled storage and regular maintenance and attention as needed ever since, XKC 052 has benefited from a pampered life over the last 15 years and still displays the beautiful quality of Mr. Pearson’s restoration.

    Now publicly available for the first time in many years, this historically significant C-Type is one of those rare sports-racing cars that truly embodies a crowning acquisition. It is a very significant component of Jaguar’s storied racing history and remains one of the rarest and most significant race cars of that period, let alone one of the most timelessly beautiful sports cars ever designed. The apogee of the C-Type’s technical development, this highly desirable Works Lightweight would make a spectacular addition to the most pedigreed collections, being enjoyed for its brisk performance in vintage rallies throughout the world. XKC 052 also promises acclaim at the world’s finest concours, offering future ownership a singular and impressive landmark in the Coventry legend."

    A GREAT CAR WITH ALL OF ITS MAJOR COMPONENTS IN SITU, REBODIED TWICE BUT OTHERWISE AUTHENTIC UNLIKE SO MANY JAGUAR'S. CAME 4TH AT LE MANS AND ONE OF ONLY THREE LIGHTWEIGHT SPEC C-TYPE'S BUILT. JOHN PEARSON PREPARED TO THE HIGHEST ORDER AND REALLY ENIGMATIC. THE EQUIVALENT FERRARI WOULD BE DOUBLE THE AMOUNT BUT I THINK THIS WILL BE $10 MILLION.
     
  9. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    8 - Porsche RS60 #718-044. Gooding. Sunday. Lot 143. Estimate 5.5 mil.+

    Lot description -

    "This car, 718-044, was the last of the four works RS60s constructed, and it made its competition debut at the most famous race of all, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. For the 1960 race, Porsche entered a team of four specially prepared cars, consisting of three works RS60s (718-042, 718-043, 718-044) and a Carrera Abarth GTL (1001), with the aim of defeating Scuderia Ferrari’s 250 Testa Rossas. All three RS60s were powered by the Type 547 engine; however, two cars, 718-043 and 718-044, were equipped with larger 1,606 cc versions – a ploy by Porsche to move into the two-liter class – which allowed a larger 100-liter fuel tank. The most notable feature of the works RS60s, however, was their bodywork, which featured a high rear-deck lid and tall Plexiglas side windows faired into the new FIA-mandated windshield, giving the Spyders the appearance of a low, roofless coupe. This more aerodynamic configuration, combined with the larger-displacement engine, gave the works RS60s a significant advantage over the customer cars; and they were clocked as fast as 145 mph, whereas the fastest standard RS60 could barely reach 138 mph. For the 24-hour epic, 718-044 served as Porsche’s lead car and was entrusted to Jo Bonnier and Graham Hill. Wearing race no. 33, the RS60 was delayed in the race’s opening laps. But by 6 am, the talented drivers managed to work their way back up to the lead in the two-liter class before a blown gasket caused the engine to fail. As in the 1959 race, the works Porsches were plagued by engine trouble, and both 718-043 and 718-044 failed to finish the race. The next outing for 718-044 took place at the 12 Hours of Sebring in March 1961, where Porsche’s two works RS60s, 718-043 and 718-044, were joined by six customer cars. For this race, Porsche installed an even larger 1,678 cc engine in 718-044 and entrusted it to Hans Herrmann and Edgar Barth. When the other works RS60, driven by Bonnier and Dan Gurney, retired around the seventh hour, team manager Fritz “Huschke” von Hanstein called in 718-044 and put the faster duo in the car. Unfortunately, Bonnier and Gurney were a bit too fast, and the RS60 retired an hour and a half later with a broken camshaft.

    The most memorable race for 718-044 took place at the legendary Targa Florio on April 30, 1961. For this race, the Porsche team fielded three Spyders, all equipped with different engines: 718-043 ran a 1,700 cc engine; 718-044 was equipped with a two-liter Type 587 unit; and 718-047, a works RS61, ran a two-liter, eight-cylinder engine. Interestingly, 718-044 was technically entered by American Lloyd “Lucky” Casner’s Camoradi team, but was prepared and maintained by the Porsche works team. For the grueling Sicilian race, 718-044 was entrusted to two of the best English drivers, Stirling Moss and Graham Hill. In his book My Cars, My Career, Moss recalled the outstanding nature of the works RS60, stating that it was, “a super car, beautifully well balanced and simply tailor-made for the Targa Florio… That was one morning I woke up and could say to myself, ‘For today’s race you have got the ideal car…’ ” Moss started the race and, by the time he handed the RS60 over to Hill at the end of his four laps, 718-044 was about a minute and a half ahead of 2nd Place Bonnier in another works Porsche and nearly two minutes ahead of the 3rd Place Ferrari 246 SP driven by Wolfgang von Trips and Olivier Gendebien. When Hill returned the RS60 to Moss, the Porsche was trailing the Ferrari by more than a minute. Charging over the circuit, Moss managed to take the lead back from the Ferrari and held a 65-second advantage going into the final lap. During the last lap, Moss was on pace to set a course record, and yet, just 5 km from the finish, the Porsche’s differential seized – surely as a result of the two-liter engine’s increased torque. Moss and 718-044 skidded to a stop, giving Ferrari the victory. The final race for 718-044 as a works entry was at the 1000 Km of Nürburgring in May 1961, where it was equipped with a 1,678 cc engine and driven by Barth and Herrmann. Sadly, the Porsche had to retire after suffering a burned piston early in the race. After serving the works team for a year, 718-044 was shipped to North America, where Porsche Cars entered it in the Player’s 200 at Mosport. Wearing the same no. 23 as it had at Nürburgring, the RS60 was driven by Bonnier to a 2nd Place finish behind Moss in a 2.5-liter Lotus 19.

    Following this strong result at Mosport, 718-044 was sold to Bernhard Vihl of Clifton, New Jersey. Vihl, a successful industrialist, began racing sports cars in the mid-1950s and owned a succession of Porsche Spyders. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Vihl was also the main financial backer of Bob Holbert, whose talent as a driver and enthusiasm for Porsches was instrumental in establishing the marque in the US. As Holbert raced a number of RSKs, RS60s, and RS61s between 1960 and 1962, many have confused 718-044 with Holbert’s other Spyders, creating discrepancies in its published racing history. As a former works car, 718-044 was the only Holbert car with a dash-mounted fusebox and, early in Vihl’s ownership, the car’s nose was modified into a distinctive “anteater” style, making this car unique and easily identifiable. As such, the only definitive record of Holbert driving 718-044 took place at the Bahamas Speed Week in late 1961, where he captured two overall wins and a 1st in Class in the Nassau Trophy race. Around 1962, the RS60 was sold to a mechanic named Hans Ziries, and its next recorded owner was Clarence Catallo from Dearborn, Michigan. A famous name in hot rod circles, Catallo is best known for owning a 1932 Ford Coupe known as “Silver Sapphire,” which was featured on the cover of the famous Beach Boys album, Little Deuce Coupe. It was this famous hot rod that Catallo sold in 1965 to buy the RS60. In 1978, respected Porsche collector Warren Eads was searching for an important RS60/61 and flew to Detroit to inspect 718-044. When he arrived, he noticed the car’s two front torsion-bar adjustments, immediately identifying the Spyder as a genuine factory racer. After negotiating a purchase, he entrusted legendary four-cam expert Al Cadrobbi to do the mechanical restoration and enlisted expert body men Don Borth and Jack Hagemann to restore the aluminum coachwork. Completed in 1982, the RS60 was vintage raced through the mid-1990s, when it was sent to noted Spyder specialist Urs Gretener for further attention and freshening. Since this work was completed in 1998, 718-044 has been the centerpiece of several important private collections and exhibited at the Monterey Historics, the first running of the Le Mans vintage races, Rennsport Reunion III, the 50th Anniversary Porsche Parade, and the Goodwood Revival. In addition to being featured in countless books on the Porsche marque, it was twice featured in the Salon section of Road & Track magazine, most recently in May 2000, when it was driven by Phil Hill in a comparison test with its period rival, the Ferrari 246 S Dino. Hill, who raced Ferraris for much of his career, certainly appreciated the finer qualities of the works Porsche, stating, “While the Dino shape and its red paint may appeal to your heart and soul, the finished RS60 is probably a more thoughtful design that satisfies the intellect.” Faithfully presented today in its 1961 Sebring livery, 718-044 is being offered for public sale for the first time. Well-known and highly regarded among marque experts, this car is among the most important Porsche Spyders in existence, as one of only four works RS60s built and a veteran of the most important FIA races: Le Mans, Sebring, Targa Florio, and Nürburgring. During its active racing career, 718-044 was driven by the best drivers of the era, including Stirling Moss, Graham Hill, Jo Bonnier, Dan Gurney, Edgar Barth, Hans Herrmann, and Bob Holbert. Considering that the other works RS60s are held in three of the most important Porsche collections – those of the Porsche Museum, Miles Collier, and Dr. Julio Palmaz – the appearance of 718-044 represents what may be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire the ultimate evolution of Porsche’s legendary four-cam Spyder."

    A WONDERFUL EXAMPLE OF PORSCHE'S EARLY WORK. DRIVEN BY HILL, MOSS, BARTH, HERRMANN AMONGST OTHERS AND ONE OF FOUR IN THIS SPEC. WONDERFULLY ORIGINAL AND IN GOOD WORKING ORDER. AGAIN THE EQUIVALENT FERRARI WOULD BE DOUBLE THE EXPENSE. WELL WORTH $5 MILLION. ESPECIALLY CONSIDERING WHAT YOU COULD DO WITH IT. LIKE A BOSS.
     
  10. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    9 - 1998 McLaren F1 "LM spec." #73. RM. Thursday. Lot 107.

    Lot description -

    " The second-to-last “standard” F1 road car built, chassis number 073, was completed in 1998 and delivered that year to its first high-profile owner. According to information supplied in the owner’s manual (written in and signed by Gordon Murray himself), this car was designated as a European-delivery example that had been finished in AMG Green Velvet with a two-tone cream and green interior. The car was built over the summer of 1998, and it is noted as being delivered new on September 4, 1998. However, rather than being shipped out to its first owner, that owner specified for his car to be kept at McLaren’s facilities in Woking. Since the F1 was left in the custody of McLaren, all its requisite services and upgrades were performed by the factory during this time. A unique aspect of McLaren is that owners, current or original, of McLaren F1s have the opportunity to send their cars back to the factory to be upgraded to their desire. That department, now called McLaren Special Operations, was set up to service, upgrade, and personalize F1s for their discerning clients. Some cars that entered the MSO facilities received only minor cosmetic updates, while some received sweeping changes that left few stones unturned, in an effort to improve upon what is the finest road going automobile ever built by man. Chassis 073 is an example of the latter. In fulfilling McLaren Special Operations’ goal of making chassis 073 the finest and most desirable F1 on the planet, the car was fitted with the more powerful LM-specification engine. These engines were further optimized with parts derived from the GTR race cars to provide 680 horsepower at 7,800 rpm, which was accomplished by increasing the compression ratio, changing the cams, using different pistons, and swapping airflow meters for air pressure sensors. Chassis number 073 was also updated with larger radiators, to provide additional cooling, and a sports exhaust.

    It is one of only two road going F1s to be fitted with an LM engine. McLaren also installed the Extra High Downforce Package, which includes a revised nose with additional front wing vents and a more aggressive rear wing over the traditional High Downforce Package. It was also fitted with a 4-millimeter Gurney flap, to further aid the car’s high-speed stability. As the original headlights were a noted weak point on F1s, gas discharge headlights were fitted for improved visibility. A custom set of 18-inch multi-spoke wheels were fitted as well. Finally, the car was refinished in a brilliant orange metallic, which is a hue seldom seen on F1s and perfectly suits its stunning design. The updates did not stop there. Inside, the car has been fitted with a number of modern amenities. The interior was updated to GT specifications and retrimmed in magnolia leather and alcantara, with beige alcantara inserts in the seats. Numerous other modern improvements were made, including upgrading the air-conditioning system and stereo and installing a Phillips satellite navigation system, as well as a helicopter-grade car-to-car radio and intercom system. The intercom allows passengers to speak to each other with ease, even while accelerating north of 7,000 rpm. McLaren fitted the car with a larger 14-inch steering wheel, an LM-style handbrake, an LM-style instrument cluster with a shift light, and tinted side windows, and they also etched “073” into the tachometer. The final touch was by Gordon Murray: he signed the car just ahead of the ignition switch on the transmission tunnel. The sum of these upgrades produced a car which is lauded by many as the finest driving F1 in existence, as it is a perfect mix of the best aspects of both the original road car and the radical LM. Only five LMs were sold to the public (with an additional prototype being retained by McLaren), and while these cars are considered the very best, they rarely come available for sale and are often traded for nearly twice the value of a road-specification F1. Chassis 073 offers all that the F1 LMs offer, but in a package that can be comfortably enjoyed on the open road. The car was sold by its first owner in 2003 to a collector in Florida, and it has remained in the Sunshine State ever since. Since leaving the custody of its original owner, the car has only accumulated an additional 700 kilometers, meaning that the engine has covered just under 6,000 kilometers during its time with chassis number 073. It has only been serviced by McLaren, to ensure that it is appropriately maintained and ready to drive and enjoy at a moment’s notice. Please consult an RM representative to review the extensive receipts on file from 2013, which total over $80,000 and include such notable items as the replacement of a clutch and fuel cell. Accompanying chassis number 073 is its original exhaust, a correct original gold-plated titanium Facom tool roll, a Facom mechanic’s roll-around tool chest with a torque wrench, luggage, and its original owner’s and service manuals. It was also fitted with new tires. Few people ever get to see an F1 in person, and even fewer have ever had a chance to inspect one up close, let alone slide past the butterfly doors and into its three-seater cabin. Perhaps two or three hundred people have ever had the privilege of driving one, and fewer still have ever realized the dream of owning a McLaren F1. Today, RM Sotheby’s offers a rare and singular opportunity for a new caretaker to purchase chassis number 073, a U.S.-legal example.

    The successful bidder will sit behind the wheel of a car that combines the comforts of the original F1 with the performance of the radical LMs and the best of modern conveniences—all as set up by the talented artisans of the McLaren Special Operations team. Within the realm of the McLaren F1, a special car in its own right, chassis 073 is even more special, as it offers luxury options that are absent from the LM and performance above that of the road-specification F1s. Moreover, it is one of only two examples, making it rarer than a typical LM, and it is a car whose three-seat configuration may never be repeated within the advent of modern safety regulations. Here, in the ultimate version of the greatest automobile ever built, its new owner will become the next member of a close-knit and exclusive fraternity of enthusiasts, each of whom is dedicated to serving as the custodian of a McLaren F1 and enjoying it at speed. To call this car the "modern 250 GTO" is no exaggeration, nor is the exclusivity of joining this rarified club."

    THE MODERN GTO? CERTAINLY THE ONLY NON-FEZZA TO COME NEAR THE PANACHE AND MYSTIQUE OF THE GTO. THIS IS ONE OF THE VERY BEST F1'S. US-LEGAL, ULTIMATE SPEC., WELL MAINTAINED, NEVER CRASHED. EASILY $10 MILLION, MAYBE EVEN $15 MILLION, TIME WILL TELL.
     
  11. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    10 - 1959 Ferrari 250GT California Spider #1307GT - RM. Thursday. Lot 118. Estimate US$9 million+

    Lot description -

    "Chassis number 1307GT was constructed in early 1959 and began life as the 23rd of 50 LWB California Spiders built by Ferrari. On March 27, 1959, it was sold new directly from the factory to its first owner, Prince Alvise Hercolani of Bologna. Of course, a Ferrari fit for a prince would have some custom features, and this California Spider is no exception. To begin to describe in detail how sensuous the looks of this particular California Spider is would be wasting time and words, just as trying to explain how Audrey Hepburn is beautiful. The car is fitted with open headlights, which was a configuration seen only on a handful of California Spiders, including the examples that finished 1st overall at the 1959 12 Hours of Sebring (1207GT) and 5th overall and 3rd in class at the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans (1451GT). The open headlight configuration provided greater visibility than closed headlamps, as the covers obstructed the light during nighttime driving. According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, 1307GT was originally fitted with highly attractive Superamerica-style front fender vents, an inset air intake on the hood, and a hardtop, giving this particular California Spider a very elegant appearance. The car’s special features were not only skin deep. Under the hood, the car’s 3.0-liter Colombo engine was topped with triple Weber carburetors, which breathed through factory-fitted velocity stacks contained within a cold air box; these are highly desirable performance options that were fitted to only a handful of examples. Inside, the ignition switch and other controls were relocated from the dashboard to on the transmission tunnel below the dashboard and instrument panel, allegedly in an effort to give taller drivers more leg and knee room. Hercolani owned chassis number 1307GT for just six months before selling it to Wolfgang Seidel, the German racing driver who had competed in a number of events, including a handful of Formula One grand prix, the Mille Miglia, and the 1958 12 Hours of Sebring, where he and American Harry Schell placed 3rd overall and 1st in class in a Porsche 718 RSK. Appropriately, chassis number 1307GT also saw limited use on the race track under Seidel’s ownership, placing 2nd in class at the March 1960 Pferdsfeld airfield race in Germany, where it was driven by Gerd Koch. The car was also seen at the fifth Brussels Grand Prix in 1961, where Seidel was entered to race a Lotus-Climax yet did not start the race. In 1961, Seidel sold the car to Rolf Helm, who in turn sold it to William W. Morgan, an American living in Wiesbaden, Germany. Morgan drove the car quite frequently in his ownership, including on a trip from Wiesbaden to Marseille. He then put the car on a boat to Corsica, where he spent a two-week vacation with his wife. The car was then shipped to Geneva and driven by Morgan to Modena in 1962. Both of these are journeys perfectly suited for a car like the California Spider. Fast, luxurious, and comfortable: this was an automobile perfectly suited for traveling in high fashion to and from beautiful locales. Morgan had the car serviced at the factory in September 1963, and in 1965, he had it again shipped by boat, this time to his new home in Pleasant Hills, California. Morgan relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona, later that year and advertised the car for sale the following summer. On September 22, 1966, Morgan sold the car to none other than Ed Niles, a Los Angeles-based attorney and well-respected Ferrari collector and historian. Niles had the car repainted dark red but only kept it for just under a year before selling it to Ronald Semler, of North Hollywood, in June 1967. Jim Swartout, a 29-year-old college student from Lake Forest, Illinois, purchased the car in November 1968. A few years later, Swartout moved to California, where he kept the California Spider for the next 30 years. In 1989, the car was noted as being highly original. After selling his dental supply business and retiring, Swartout listed the car for sale, and it was eventually sold to Jonas Linden, of Stocksund, Sweden, in 1999. Linden commissioned a full restoration at Carrozzeria Autosport, Bacchelli & Villa in Bastiglia, Italy. The car was first shown following its restoration at the Ferrari Owners’ Club UK National Concours in June 2001 by Peter Jaye, although it was still owned by Linden at that time. The car was purchased by Joe Hayes, of Chicago, Illinois, in 2003, and Hayes immediately hit the road, participating in the Texas 1000 and New England 1000 rallies with his wife. After the completion of the rallies, the car was stripped to its bare metal and refinished in dark blue, the same color it was during Seidel’s ownership, and its hardtop was refinished in silver, also the color it sported under Seidel’s tenure. The car was shown at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in August 2005. Three years later, it was shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in the special California Spider class. In 2009 and 2010, Hayes invested nearly $115,000 to bring chassis number 1307 up to Ferrari Club of America Platinum award-winning standards. Ferrari specialist Greg Jones was commissioned for a complete motor and suspension rebuild, and the entire car was detailed to concours standards before being shown at the Cavallino Classic in 2011. At this time, the car was certified by Ferrari Classiche and confirmed to be matching numbers throughout. Hayes sold the car in 2011, and it was purchased by Adam Lindenmann, an avid art collector living in New York City. Lindeman sold the car in late 2013 to Jean-Claude Biver, of Switzerland. Biver commissioned Garage Alberto Donati in Corseaux to refresh chassis number 1307GT’s restoration; accordingly, it was refinished in a similar shade of dark blue.

    Shortly thereafter, the car was purchased by its current owner, and it has been maintained ever since in a climate-controlled environment and exercised appropriately to ensure that it remains in excellent cosmetic and mechanical condition. It is offered with a hearty file, including copies of its original build sheets, its Classiche certification binder, the car’s original Automobile Club d’Italia forms, correspondence between previous owners, and service and restoration invoices. Chassis number 1307GT features several unique and desirable factory features, making it a highly compelling and very desirable example of one of Ferrari’s most iconic convertibles. With a combination of special features that enhance both its beauty and performance, 1307GT offers the best of both worlds and perfectly illustrates Ferrari’s incredible penchant for building sporting automobiles with a flair for Italian luxury. While all California Spiders are exceptional vehicles, it is those with unique features that add to their visual appeal that are the most desirable. As a result, these examples command a significant premium in today’s market over any “standard” examples. Incidentally, the most valuable examples of the California Spyder, many of them with competition history, feature open headlights, just like 1307GT. First and foremost, a California Spider is nothing short of iconic, not only in terms of collectability and design but also in terms of its significance to pop culture and its inarguable sex appeal. It is a design of relative simplicity that is at once instantly recognizable and utterly perfect yet immediately acknowledged by all who behold it, expert or otherwise, as one of the most desirable Ferraris in the world. Chassis 1307GT, with its features, colors, and hardtop, has presence unlike any of its siblings, and it is widely regarded as one of the most stunning examples in existence."

    GLORIOUSLY PRESENTED IN WONDERFUL COLOURS. CLASSICHE CERTIFIED, HARDTOP FITTED AND HALF THE PRICE OF A COVERED HEADLIGHT, SWB. VERY GOOD VALUE AT THE LOW ESTIMATE. $10 MILLION.
     
  12. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 5, 2010
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    NZ
    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    11 - 1961 Ferrari 250GT SWB California Spider #3095GT. Gooding. Sunday. Lot 129. Estimate US$16 million+.

    Lot description -

    "The Ferrari 250 GT presented here, chassis 3095 GT, is among the most desirable SWB California Spiders, as it features the highly attractive covered headlight treatment that Scaglietti applied to 37 of the 56 examples built. In addition to this significant distinction, this is one of a limited number of SWB California Spiders factory-equipped with an optional hardtop and a distinctive passenger-side headrest. Originally finished in the splendid color scheme of Blu Metallizzato (Metallic Blue) with red leather upholstery, 3095 GT was equipped with features typical of the late-production SWB models: a Tipo 168/61 engine, three Weber 40 DCL 6 carburetors, Abarth Lusso exhaust system, white-faced Veglia instruments, and polished Borrani wire wheels wearing Pirelli Cinturato tires. As completed on December 19, 1961, 3095 GT was the 33rd SWB California Spider built. It was delivered new to Baron Emmanuel de Graffenried’s official Ferrari dealership, Italauto SA in Lausanne, Switzerland. Little is known of the car’s first owner except that his name was M. Babour and that he had his California Spider serviced and maintained at the Ferrari factory’s assistenza clienti in Modena through May 1964. According to the research of Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, 3095 GT may have been owned or used by Gunter Sachs, the famous German industrialist, filmmaker, and international playboy, in late 1964 or early 1965, while he was living in Saint-Raphael, France. Despite these early mysteries, it is well documented that Stephen Safran, an American medical student living in Grenoble, France, purchased 3095 GT in 1965 from Italauto SA. Over the next three years, Mr. Safran used the elegant California Spider as his daily driver, installing a discreet key-operated alarm to keep the car safe and modifying the accelerator pedal to aid in heel-and-toe shifting while driving at speed. Garage Montchoisy in Switzerland and Piero Drogo in Italy maintained the California Spider for Safran until he moved to England in 1968. Soon after arriving in England, the California’s engine “swallowed a valve” and was sent to Col. Ronnie Hoare’s Maranello Concessionaires for a rebuild. Later that year, Safran returned to the US and traded in his aging California Spider to New York sports car dealer Bob Grossman for a new Jaguar E-Type and cash. The entire deal was valued at just $7,500 and the blue Ferrari was then repainted red in hopes of attracting an American buyer. From there, 3095 GT is thought to have remained in the US until it was sold to Pierre de Siebenthal of Lausanne, Switzerland, in the late 1970s. A fascinating character, de Siebenthal was an amateur racing driver, mechanic, and proprietor of a scrapyard, famed for its sprawling collection of forlorn exotics, where everything from Aston Martins to Lamborghinis could be found in varying states of disrepair.

    Though many remember him for these lesser cars, de Siebenthal owned a number of important Ferraris, from a 166 MM to a 250 LM, which he often entered in historic racing events. This car was surely one of de Siebenthal’s prized possessions, and, in April 1981, he entered the California Spider in the historic races at Monza. A series of photos shows the 20-year-old Ferrari in race-ready trim – wearing Swiss dealer plates, with its bumpers removed and competition SNAP exhaust extractors fitted. In the early 1980s, de Siebenthal sold the California Spider to an American enthusiast; however, it wasn’t long before the car returned to Europe, eventually joining a private collection in France. In the 1990s, 3095 GT was sold to Emilio Gnutti of Brescia, Italy, a respected collector with a stable of outstanding road and racing Ferraris, ranging from a 375 MM Berlinetta to a Series I Cabriolet. In 2004, both a FIVA Identity Card and an ASI Certificato di Identita were issued for the Ferrari, each bearing the desirable A/3 classification. Two years later, Sig. Gnutti had the California Spider certified by the Ferrari Classiche Department, which, in fall 2006, issued the Certificazione di Autenticita for 3095 GT and confirmed that the car retains its original chassis, body, engine, and other important mechanical components. The current owner, a gentleman with a collection of the finest sports and racing cars, has been an excellent steward for the Ferrari and has gone to great lengths to enhance its already superb presentation. Over the past several years, the car has been looked after by respected UK specialist Tim Samways Sporting & Historic Car Engineers Ltd., which performed an engine rebuild and other important service work as recently as 2014. The California Spider has continued to benefit from regular care and exercise, and, most recently, it has been kept at the owner’s winter home in the south of France – an ideal locale for the glamorous open Ferrari. While in the current ownership, 3095 GT also made a memorable appearance at the Belgian Grand Prix in August 2014, when it served as the official parade car for Scuderia Ferrari driver Kimi Raikkonen.

    Though the Ferrari can most certainly be used and enjoyed in its current condition, its as-delivered specification is most appealing. There is no denying that this covered-headlight SWB California Spider would be a particularly striking example finished in its original Blu Metallizzato, with a matching hardtop and red leather upholstery, though it should be noted that a hardtop does not accompany the car. Unlike many top-tier Ferraris, 3095 GT has not yet been the subject of a full restoration, and it has not made the rounds at various concours d’elegance, offering its new owner the rare pleasure of being the first to exhibit such an important 250 Ferrari at the most exclusive international events. Amazingly, the last time that 3095 GT was offered for public sale in the US was in the late 1960s, a time when only the cognoscenti knew that a California Spider was something truly special and not just another used Italian sports car. In the decades that have passed since, the California Spider has become recognized the world over as one of the most beautiful, desirable, and valuable road-going Ferrari models of all time – an undisputed automotive icon with a universal appeal, revered by casual enthusiasts and connoisseurs alike. While any 250 Ferrari is among the upper echelon of collector cars, this Classiche Certified, covered-headlight SWB California Spider is surely a star among the best of them."

    SURE IT'S THE PERFECT CAR WITH COVERED HEADLIGHTS AND IT'S SHORT WHEELBASE BUT THAT'S ABOUT IT. THE EVER INCREASING PRICE OF ENTRY TO THIS CLUB SEEMS LIKE A BIT OF A P:SSING MATCH RATHER THAN A LOGICAL MARKET DRIVEN INCREASE. JUST THREE YEARS AGO THESE WOULD HAVE STRUGGLED TO GET $10 MILLION, 10 YEARS AGO YOU COULD BUY ONE FOR A MILLION. $18 MILLION SEEMS A STRETCH, I WOULD GO WITH $15 MILLION.
     
  13. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    12 - 1957 Ferrari 410SA Series II Pininfarina Coupe #0717SA. Gooding. Saturday. Lot 135. Estimate 5 million+.

    Lot description -

    "Numbered 0717 SA, this 410 Superamerica is documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini as the fourth of just six short-wheelbase Series II examples produced, and it is the 21st 410 Superamerica of the 34 built in all along three distinct series. The chassis was sent to Pinin Farina on July 18, 1957. Handsomely finished in Grigio Metallizzato (Metallic Gray) with a red roof over red Connolly leather, 0717 SA was sold to HRH Mohammad Shah Reza Pahlavi of Iran; and Enzo Ferrari personally greeted the shah and his wife, Princess Soraya, née Soraya Esfandiari-Bakhtiari, when they went to pick up the car. Princess Soraya was glamorous, rich, and famous. She was perhaps best known for her penetrating eyes, but less well known was her passion for speed. She was a highly accomplished skier and, after she and her husband were exiled to Italy in 1954, developed a love for Ferraris, the most powerful and exclusive automobiles of the day. According to a Forza article in June 2003, the shah and the princess had visited the Ferrari factory to have their coachbuilt 410 custom-fit to their specifications. The work included the fitment of a unique two-position driving setup: one for a taller driver, the shah, and a custom-made cushion that would allow the princess to drive the powerful car with command and comfort. Interestingly, the dual-driving setup remains with 0717 SA, which has since become known as “The Princess’ Ferrari.” Although the marriage of the shah and the princess ended in divorce, the 410 Superamerica remained with her as she began her new life as an actress. Maintained by the Ferrari factory through March 1965, by which time the Ferrari had covered just 5,172 km, 0717 SA was registered on Iranian license plates ‘‘IR 10988.’’ In 1967, Tom Barrett III of Scottsdale imported the princess’ 410 Superamerica to the US, and it passed through the ownership of two more Arizona-based owners until it was acquired by Gary Yahnke of Phoenix, who initiated the very rare Ferrari’s concours life, with consecutive showings at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance® in 1977 and 1978, when 0717 SA won First in Class. In 1979, Mr. Yahnke sold 0717 SA to Kim Franceschini of New Jersey, who in July 1980 won Best of Show, the Phil Hill Award, and First in Class with it at the Ferrari Club of America annual meeting in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The next chapter in the story of 0717 SA began in 1984, when film producer Greg Garrison of Thousand Oaks, California, purchased it from Mr. Franceschini. Mr. Garrison, a well-known collector specializing in the rarest and most desirable coachbuilt Ferrari classics, kept the vehicle until July 2001, when he sold 0717 SA to the current owner, himself a noted private collector with a penchant for the finest and rarest Ferrari V-12 models.

    In late 2001 and early 2002, the 410 Superamerica was given a concours-level restoration by John Carlson’s Gran Turismo Motors in Monrovia, California, with metalwork and paint handled by Steve Beckman’s Metal Works in Costa Mesa, California. Mileage at the time of the restoration was recorded as 20,464. Soon after the restoration was completed, 0717 SA resumed its show career, with appearances at the 2002 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance® and the inaugural Winter Park Concours d’Elegance. In January 2003, the Ferrari earned a Gold Award at the XII Palm Beach Cavallino Classic; and that April, 0717 SA appeared at the 39th Ferrari Club of America National Meet and Concours in Sebring, Florida, where it won the Classic Ferrari Award and Platinum in Class 2. Soon thereafter, 0717 SA was the subject of a feature article in Ferrari magazine, Forza. The trophy run of 0717 SA continued in 2004 with the car winning Platinum in Class 10 at the XIII Palm Beach Cavallino Classic that January, followed by Best in Class FC – Ferrari Closed – at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in March. In June 2005, 0717 SA was particularly successful at the 42nd Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meeting and Concours at Indianapolis, where it was awarded the Luigi Chinetti Memorial Award for the outstanding Ferrari road car at the event, plus the Forza Ferrari award for the outstanding Ferrari built in the 1950s. All told, the car had an amazing trophy run in just three short years.

    Beautifully restored under the present owner, this exceptional Ferrari is being offered with the intention that the consignor will use proceeds from its sale to benefit an important foundation that furthers the educational opportunities of America’s children. The Wayne and Marilyn Nelson Foundation was created more than 10 years ago to provide funding to elementary schools and to assist universities in giving scholarships to students in need of financial aid. The Nelson Foundation recognized the importance of identifying children early in their academic career and awarding them with financial assistance on their path to higher education. The foundation has also held seminars on the benefits of a comprehensive education. Fittingly, the consignor has stated that some of the proceeds from the sale of the Princess’ Ferrari will provide funding for scholarships in Automobile Restoration at McPherson College and the Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology. Gooding & Company is proud to promote this wonderful cause. The star-crossed history of the Princess’ Ferrari is an extraordinary narrative. Apart from its provenance, however, 0717 SA stands proudly on its own merits. It must certainly also be considered on the basis of its muscular, close-coupled Pinin Farina styling, an attribute enhanced by the shorter chassis of the exclusive Series II 410 Superamerica. That attribute, along with its extreme rarity, high quality, outstanding specifications, and unimpeachable history, make 0717 SA a spectacular opportunity for anyone seeking to add a once-in-a-lifetime car to their collection."

    A TRULY BEAUTIFUL CAR WITH THE BIG LAMPREDI V12 AND REALLY GREAT PININFARINA STYLING. IMAGINE DRIVING THIS ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA. GREAT HISTORY WITH THE SHAH OF IRAN BEING THE FIRST OWNER. WONDERFUL. $5 MILLION EASILY AND STILL GOOD BUYING.
     
  14. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    13 - 1931 Bentley 4.5 Litre 'Blower' 2 Seater Sport #MS3929. RM. Lot 342. Saturday. Estimate 4.5 million+

    Lot description -

    "Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay’s report on this car, chassis number MS3929, notes that it was indeed originally built as a supercharged car from new. Upon completion in 1931, however, it apparently remained unsold for two full years, due to Bentley Motors’ receivership, before being finally bodied with a new four-passenger Tourer body, number 1829, by Vanden Plas in 1933. Delivered in this form to A. Ansell and registered as JB 1850, it was the last “W.O.” Bentley to have been fitted with the iconic Vanden Plas coachwork. Bentley Motors service records indicate that the car was acquired as early as 1933 by famous Maidenhead dealer R.S. Mead and then by April of 1934 by C.E. Robinson, who acquired the car through the showroom of W.O. Bentley’s brother, H.M. The car was sold back to H.M. Bentley by Mr. Robinson, next passing in 1936 to J.M. Campbell before being shipped out of the U.K. to Cape Town, South Africa, in late 1937 by the next owner, Dr. T.W. Stephens. While in Cape Town, it was driven by Oscar Heim, whose report on enjoying the car was published in the April 27, 1939, issue of the Cape Times and later reprinted in the Bentley Drivers Club Review in May 1984. The car remained in South Africa through World War II, being returned to the U.K. by a friend of Dr. Stephens, believed to have been M.C.C. Haycraft, reportedly a Royal Air Force Squadron leader. In 1957, the Bentley was exported to the United States by J.D. Clark, passing in 1962 to C.M. Crowhurst, then to E.S. Nisbet, and then in February 1969 to John Webb de Campi, the late, respected Rolls-Royce and Bentley historian. During his ten-year tenure of ownership, Mr. de Campi restored the Bentley with its original Vanden Plas bodywork. The Bentley returned to the U.K. in 1979 and was acquired in 1987 by its present owner. In 1990, a fresh restoration was undertaken. As part of this work, Ulf Smith, of Sweden, built the present body and fenders for the car, marking its only modification from new; the body is a copy of the lightweight fabric two-seater sports body built by Vanden Plas for the famous #1 “Blower,” chassis number HB3402, for the 1929 500 Miles Race at Brooklands. Fortunately, the owner, sensitive to the preservation of history, retained the original Vanden Plas body, which has been crated and is being sold with the car today, should the successful bidder wish to take the Bentley back to its original form.

    Critical to the acquisition of any “Blower” Bentley is determining how much of the car is still original, as many were raced as intended, with the common accompanying results of engine, body, and gearbox changes. Fortunately, surviving original factory records and the work of Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay have allowed the originality of surviving cars to be determined with very little doubt. As Dr. Hay notes of this Bentley: The supercharger number isn’t listed in the Service Records; the blower units are numbered 101-150, with the last two numbers of the supercharger number usually the same as, or very close to, the last two digits of the chassis number. MS3929 is, I gather, fitted with supercharger no. 129 and this is, I am sure, the original unit for the chassis. The original engine isn’t listed; by interpolation from the records, it is no. MS3932…The gearbox as new would have been the standard close-ratio ‘D’ type box, but no number is listed in the Service Record. Interpolation from the Service Records suggests that the original box was no. 7241, this is now confirmed as the gearbox in the car. The conclusion is that, aside from details such as the switchgear, Bosch magnetos, and the use of improved Hartford shock absorbers, this is today much the same vehicle mechanically that it was when built, with its original chassis frame, engine, gearbox, and supercharger.

    Few “W.O.” Bentleys can make such a claim—and even fewer “Blowers.” The owner has had the car properly accepted and documented by the FIA and has proceeded to compete with it in such major events as the Mille Miglia. He notes that it has recently received a full examination, with all necessary servicing carried out, including a complete restoration and overhauling of the engine between 2011 and 2012 and new brakes. During the complete engine overhauling, the inner cylinders were replaced, with the original cylinders saved and accompanying the car today, at a reported cost of $150,000. A more recent major service was completed at a reported cost of $25,000. Records for the services undertaken in the present ownership are on file, along with a collection of copies of mentions of this car in various Bentley books, correspondence with the W.O. Bentley Foundation, and, of course, Dr. Hay’s detailed and fascinating report, quoted in part above, which is recommended reading for prospective bidders. The opportunity is rare, indeed, to acquire such a well-preserved “Blower” Bentley that retains all of its original major components, is offered with its original coachwork, and has such a long and proud record of ownership by enthusiasts. This marks one of the most significant “W.O.” Bentleys to come to market lately and the priceless opportunity to acquire a genuine “Blower” with so much of its authenticity, history, and brawny original soul intact."

    NOT ENTIRELY ORIGINAL BUT OH SO ENIGMATIC ITS A WONDERFUL CAR WITH LOTS OF CHARISMA. HAY'S REPORT WOULD GIVE A NEW BUYER MUCH CLARITY AND PROVIDE CERTAINTY. I SAY OLD CHAP SHAL WE GO AND VISIT BERTIE AND HAVE A GIN AND TONIC WITH SOME CUCUMBER SANDWICHES. $5 MILLION SEEMS RIGHT.
     
  15. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    1982 Porsche 956 #956-003. Gooding. Saturday. Lot 050. Estimate 7 million+

    Lot description -
    "For that race, Porsche fielded three of its works 956s, all wearing an attractive new livery with sponsorship from the Rothmans cigarette company. In qualifying, 956-002 (driven by Ickx and Bell) qualified on the pole, with 956-003 (driven by Jochen Mass and Vern Schuppan) and 956-004 (driven by Al Holbert, Hurley Haywood, and Jürgen Barth) following in 2nd and 3rd Place, respectively. Clearly miles ahead of the competition, Porsche utterly dominated Le Mans in 1982, with the works 956s crossing the finish line together in a magnificent 1-2-3 finish, and the Porsche 935s taking 4th and 5th Place. Porsche 956-003 placed 2nd, with 956-002 taking the laurels. For the remainder of the 1982 WEC season, 956-003 served as the Porsche team’s top car, primarily driven by Ickx, Mass, and Bell. In September and October, 956-003 won the last three WEC races – Spa, Fuji, and Brands Hatch – as well as the last event of the year, a non-championship race at Kyalami. At the end of 1982, 956-003 was responsible for four of six race wins during the 956’s debut season. Most importantly, its three WEC victories secured the Drivers’ Championship for Ickx and the Manufacturers’ Championship for Porsche – a surprise bonus as Porsche had competed only in four of the seven championship rounds. 956-003 returned to Le Mans in 1983, as part of the Porsche factory’s three-car assault on the French endurance race. Driven by Schuppan, Holbert, and Haywood, 956-003 initially looked to be the weak link in the works team, starting in seventh position on the grid behind the two other Rothmans Porsche entries (956-005 and 956-008), two Martini Lancia LC2s, and two customer 956s (956-104 and 956-106). Nevertheless, it took more than outright speed to win at Le Mans, and 956-003 eventually worked its way into the lead, maintaining a smooth, consistent pace. When Holbert took over for his last stint with an hour and five minutes remaining, he was amazed to find the left-bank cylinder temperature rising, yet for several laps he kept the car cool while simultaneously managing a driver’s door that refused to stay shut and the rapidly approaching 956 of Ickx and Bell. In his famous racing anthology Time and Two Seats, Janos L. Wimpffen vividly describes the race’s thrilling conclusion: “Fifteen minutes from the end, the no. 1 car unlapped it for the last time. He routinely glanced across the gauges as he had done so many times before at this one ‘relaxing’ spot on the course. The water-cooled head temperature seized his attention – the needle had pegged. As he flicked through the Porsche Curves and the Ford Chicane, a steady trail of vapor came from under the wheel arch. Bell was a little over two minutes behind, and Holbert didn’t have time to take on a splash. Holbert had no choice but to bring it around the last 13 kilometers, while Bell kept up the pressure. The gap shrank to 63 seconds, but the American nursed the nearly seized engine across.” 956-003 crossed the finish line victorious, just before its engine expired in a billowing cloud of white smoke. Schuppan, Holbert, and Haywood’s performances not only earned them an outright win at Le Mans, they also captured the Index of Energy Efficiency and broke several track records along the way. The 1983 24 Hours of Le Mans will forever be remembered as a high-point in Porsche’s racing history, with 956s taking nine of the top 10 positions. This incredible achievement inspired the “Nobody’s Perfect” poster, one of the most memorable advertisements in Porsche history. Following its victory at Le Mans, 956-003 was occasionally run by the Porsche factory team, appearing at Kyalami in October 1983, as well as at Imola and Nürburgring in September 1984, where it was driven by Formula 1 ace John Watson. After its racing career, 956-003 was retired to the Porsche factory collection. As Porsche already owned the first 956 to win Le Mans, 956-002, and had promising new 962s waiting in the wings, it decided to sell four of the works 956s. The process of qualifying to buy one of the cars was relatively simple – you were required to have won Le Mans in a 956, for the factory. So, of the four cars sold, one each went to Ickx and Bell, with Schuppan acquiring both 956-003 and 956-009. The 1983 Le Mans winner remained in Schuppan’s private collection until 1996, when it was sold to New York-based collector Aaron Hsu. Mr. Hsu, who was then assembling an unrivaled collection of works Group C cars, treated 956-003 to a comprehensive bare-tub restoration overseen by the highly regarded Jim Groom. As the Porsche was in excellent cosmetic condition, Groom restored only the chassis and mechanical components, while the engine was sent to marque specialist Jerry Woods for a rebuild. Once completed, 956-003 made a memorable appearance at the 1998 Monterey Historics, where Porsche was the featured marque. There, Mr. Hsu reunited the 956 with Schuppan, and the 1983 Le Mans winners did several demonstration laps around Laguna Seca. n 1999, Mr. Hsu sold the 956 to Jeff Lewis of Newport Beach, California, a collector with a passion for the finest racing Porsches. From there, 956-003 then passed through the hands of two prominent East Coast collectors before being sold in 2007 to Jean Marc Luco, a resident of Switzerland. The consignor, who purchased the Porsche in 2010, has maintained 956-003 in his impressive stable of endurance racing cars and exhibited this important car at many top events, from the Goodwood Festival of Speed to the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, where, in 2014, it was honored with the award for the Most Historically Significant Porsche. Though 956-003 has been spared from an active career in vintage racing, it has always been maintained by leading Porsche specialists. Kevin Jeannette of Gunnar Racing looked after the car for much of its time in the US, Sebastian Crubilé did the same for Mr. Luco, and Gary Pearson has skillfully handled the task for the consignor. The Porsche 956 is undoubtedly one of the most successful and important models in the history of endurance racing, ranking alongside other motorsport icons such as the Alfa Romeo 8C 2300, Jaguar D-Type, Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa, and Ford GT40. When grouped together with the 962, an evolution of the original 956 design introduced in 1986, the success of this Porsche series is unrivaled in the history of sports car racing. Between 1982 and 1987, the Porsche 956 and 962 won Le Mans six times, finishing 1-2-3 every year except 1987, when they were a “mere” 1-2. In North America, the Porsche 962 won 48 of 68 IMSA GTP races between 1984 and 1987, including 1-2-3 finishes at both Daytona and Sebring for three consecutive years. Campaigned by the Porsche works team and several capable privateers, the 956 and 962 captured the WEC Manufacturers’ and Drivers’ championships (1982–1985), the World Sports Prototype Manufacturers’ and Drivers’ championships (1986–1987), the IMSA GTP Manufacturers’ Championship (1985–1988), and the IMSP GTP Drivers’ Championship (1985–1987), along with numerous other important victories and series championships. In total, Porsche built just 22 examples of the 956. Of these, just 10 were retained for the works racing team and raced in the definitive Rothmans livery. Yet, even from this limited supply of works 956s, important distinctions can be made: one chassis was used solely as a test and development car, another was broken up in period following an accident at Weissach, and two additional chassis were used as crash mules. Remarkably, 956-003 is one of only five works 956s to compete at Le Mans. 956-002 has been a fixture in the Porsche Museum collection since winning Le Mans in 1982, and three of the other works 956s, chassis 001, 008, and 009, are held in a significant private collection and are not likely to trade hands in the foreseeable future. In just two years of racing, 956-003 accomplished everything Porsche had set out to achieve with the 956 racing program. In 1982, it was responsible for more WEC points than any other 956, earning Porsche the Manufacturers’ Championship and Ickx the Drivers’ Championship. The following year, it was the overall winner of the 24 hours of Le Mans, the oldest sports car endurance race and one of the most famous and influential races in the history of motor sport. In its three-year career as a Porsche works car, 956-003 was raced by many of racing’s greatest names, including Ickx and Bell – two of the winningest drivers in the history of the 24 hours of Le Mans – as well as Holbert, Haywood, Mass, Bellof, and Watson. Beyond its incredible roster of drivers, this exceptional 956 possesses a complete, uninterrupted provenance that can be traced back to 1986, when Porsche AG sold the car to Schuppan, the works driver who had been entrusted with it at Le Mans in 1982 and 1983. With its exclusive works car status, longtail Le Mans bodywork, iconic Rothmans livery, exceptional competition record, and unblemished history, 956-003 must be considered among the most significant Porsche racing cars, and thus, one of the finest competition cars built since WWII. An irreplaceable piece of motor sport history and an essential part of Porsche’s endurance racing legend, 956-003 is an automobile of immense appeal and historical import."

    THE GREATEST MODERN LE MANS RACER AND IN THE GREATEST SPEC. THE 1983 LE MANS WINNER REPLETE WITH ITS ROTHMANS LIVERY. THE ONLY DOWNSIDE IS THAT YOU STILL CAN'T USE IT FOR A HELL OF A LOT. DRIVING IT ON THE ROAD WOULD BE POSSIBLE BUT NOT THE SMARTEST MOVE AND IT IS SIMPLY TO NEW TO BE AS VALUABLE AS 1950S OR 1960S LE MANS WINNERS. OFFERED AT RM A FEW YEARS BACK AND NOT SOLD AT LESS THAN $3 MILLION. $5 MILLION, MAYBE 6 ON A GOOD DAY.
     
  16. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    15 - 1947 Delahaye 135M Figoni & Falaschi Narval #800516. Rick Cole. Lot 900

    Lot description -

    "According to Tissot, this example, numbered 800516, was constructed upon Delahaye 135M Chassis 800516 and completed in March 1947 with its original color scheme comprising Light Blue Metallic paint with blue leather interior. It was sold and delivered to Mark B. Deitsch, the President of the Prima Company in Ohio, which manufactured fine ladies’ footwear. In 1954, the Narval was used in a magazine advertisement for “Cover Girl Dress Flats by Prima,” hence this car’s wonderful “Cover Girl” nickname. Subsequently, 800516 seems to have disappeared from view until the 1970s or early 1980s, when it was owned by Erich Traber in Switzerland, where it received partial restoration and an engine swap to engine serial number 48482, with the donor car being an Antem-bodied Delahaye 135 convertible, which was the Carrosserie Antem’s Paris show car. It can be seen on Page 75 of the Jean Antem book by Dominique Pagneux and published in 2002. While some publications had stated that the car offered here, 800516, had once received a Cadillac V-8 engine, this is incorrect. Both the Narval (800516) on offer and the Antem-bodied car (48482) were later sold as a package to the late R.L. Atwell of Fredericksburg, Texas. In the 1980′s Mr. Atwell sold the Narval with engine 48482 installed to Russ Jackson of Barrett-Jackson collector-car auction fame. His son Craig Jackson (now CEO of Barrett-Jackson), performed a full restoration and sold the Delahaye, now finished in black with dark red snakeskin leather upholstery at Barrett-Jackson’s 1989 auction to one Mr. Hata of Japan. The car remained there with him in nicely restored and little-used condition in the Hata Collection Museum until February 2013, when it was purchased and transported to California. Meanwhile, Mr. Atwell sold the Antem-bodied car with engine 800516 in it to John McMahan of Houston Texas, who retained it for many years, later selling it to J.A. Paalman of Holland. In February 2013, the Antem, now in very deteriorated condition, was purchased and transported to California to be reunited with the Narval on offer here. A number of photographs on file show the Antem-bodied car and the Narval’s original engine (800516) at the garage of Mr. McMahan in Houston circa-2000, and as located in Holland during 2013, including an image of the Narval’s original engine with the identification tag still affixed to the outside of the crankcase and just below the spark plugs. While the Antem-bodied car is quite valuable in its own right, it is ultimately worth less than it would cost to restore it; however, the engines can certainly now be re-united with their original chassis, which will in turn enhance the “Narval”. Accordingly, the Narval’s original engine, numbered 800516, will accompany the vehicle at auction, mounted on a display stand. Additionally, the Consignor advises us that the Antem Cabriolet will also be included with the sale the Narval (plus shipping) if the winning bidder desires. Recently during 2014, Narval 800516 was one of precious few road cars to be displayed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, alongside the Mercedes-Benz W198 Streamliner. The Narval was also displayed that year at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. As an unqualified motoring icon and fabulously imaginative Figoni et Falaschi design statement, Delahaye 135M Narval 800516 stands today as the ultimate, and one of the very last, expressions of the French custom coachbuilder’s art form. Uncommonly sensual in every respect, 800516 also marks the closing chapter of the Classic Era and as such, it is a CCCA Full Classic automobile that will be welcomed at virtually any concours and event the new owner should ever desire to attend. As such, it will stand confidently on its own or provide the crowning touch to any proper collection of French motorcars including the finest achievements of French coachbuilders. Original Engine No. 800516 will accompany the sale of the vehicle at auction."

    THIS IS A FINE EXAMPLE OF A FULL FRENCH CLASSIC. NOT A BUGATTI NOR PRE-WAR IT IS STILL ONE OF THE MOST EXTRAVAGANT DESIGNS EVER MADE. PERHAPS A BIT OTT BUT STILL WORTH $5 - 6 MILLION.
     
  17. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    16 - Bugatti Type 29/30 #4008 - Bonhams. Lot 17. Estimate US$950k+

    Lot description -

    "The factory records clearly detail each of these sixteen pre-production Type 29/30 chassis, of which only two are known to survive, one being Zborowski's privateer single seater Indianapolis entry, chassis 4004 and this car, chassis 4008. This car's specific chassis length (2.55m) and original two seater configuration has lead world respected Bugatti historian Pierre Yves Laugier to refer to it as 'the oldest 8-cylinder sport Bugatti and the only survivor of the 8-cylinder Type 23 Series', the 'sport' referring to its roadgoing intentions, i.e. excluding its single seater counterparts. This world respected historian reached this conclusion of the history of this fascinating milestone in the Bugatti story following one of his exhaustive 'forensic' projects. Beginning in the early 2000s, Laugier's pioneering strategy of research came from following documented transactions of cars by the license plates and their respective police jurisdiction, a facility available in his home country of France which unlike the U.S. retains much of this documentation, and where many Bugattis had enjoyed the large part of their early days. Furnished with names and addresses from these records he would vociferously pursue his findings, quite literally knocking on the doors of the houses where cars had lived, or asking neighbors if they recalled a Bugatti living in the village. Of course, it wasn't always successful, but on many occasions his findings produced revelations that unraveled long unanswered anomalies in Bugatti histories. Quite simply his contribution to this particular marque has been ground breaking and in doing so his opinion has become renowned throughout the hobby. 4008 is a perfect example of this new approach to research and once again the new information that came to light in this process has provided key insight into the importance of this car. As is now factually documented in his extensive report, which analyzes not only this, but all of the cars of this transitional model, chassis 4008 was delivered new on November 16, 1922, as such only this and one other sister car (4010) were completed before the end of that year. Both cars received coachwork in the style that had become the norm for factory supplied sports Bugattis, being a Spartan body that took its lines straight off the already iconic pear shaped radiator, stretching back to a simple oval tank - 'reservoir ovale'. In reviewing this early sequence of production, Mr. Laugier found that only numbers 4008 and 4009 are referred to in the Bugatti factory records as being for 'courses' - racing.
    By tracing the records backwards to the factory delivery, this car's history can succinctly be quantified as: 1922, delivered in Paris; 1934, sold to an owner in Lille; 1937, sold to P. Villemagne; 1968 sold to P. Salvan; then to C. Renel. At this point the car passed to an extremely well known Bugattiste, Uwe Hucke. By this stage, some of the coachwork had been lost, but as photos of his acquisition at the time confirm, the car was very much a complete entity, with everything including its bulkhead, firewall, pedals, floorboards, brake master cylinder, Zenith carburetors, dashboard, instruments and switch panel in place. It retained then as now, engine number 6 with cam box stamped 6, back axle 3 with ratio stamped 15/54, steering box number 4 and magneto cradle number 3. With a 'blank canvas' and ever keen to preserve historic chapters of the Bugatti tale, Mr. Hucke elected to restore it with a replica coachwork in the style of the famed 'cigar' torpedo cars that had campaigned at the Strasbourg Grand Prix. In this form it would become a familiar sight at many events and shows, this particular cataloguer recalling it on display at the Paris Retromobile in the early 1990s. In Mr. Hucke's twilight years as he sought to disperse his collection, the car passed to internationally renowned dealer Christoph Grohe. While with Mr. Grohe, Mr. Laugier's research began to be completed and when a chance finding with a former owner produced a set of fenders, a second rebody was carried out putting the car into a more road touring style akin to others of its series. Ultimately the car passed into British hands and then to the current owner, a passionate collector of very fine pre-war automobiles, with a particularly keen interest in 'la marque'. During this time, Pierre Laugier's research was finalized and it became very clear that with many of the cars lost in time, 4008 was the oldest two seater built for racing of them all. In its current sympathetic ownership cognizant of the fact that we are only custodians of historic automobiles, he was keen to play his part in its life and to return the car to its original form. In doing so the coachwork was removed from the car and all surviving photographs of the very early 8-cylinder cars were analyzed in depth to ensure that its original coachwork was perfectly recreated. As evidenced today, this has been an incredible success, immortalizing this important machine, by returning it to the guise in which it would have left the factory. After a process of a number of years, the oldest two seater 8-cylinder racing Bugatti was unveiled at the 2014 Zoute Grand Prix Concours d'Elegance on the north coast of Belgium, where it was lauded by a discerning European panel of judges and awarded Most Exciting Design. This is a unique motor car, being the only Bugatti conforming to the specification of the very first Grand prix model of this illustrious marque, a marque which within the next few years was to dominate Grand Prix racing more than any other had ever done before or since, and which thereby became what many still consider to be the most evocative marque in motor racing history. It is one of only two surviving examples of Bugatti's prototype batch of 8-cylinder racing cars dating from 1922. It takes little imagination to realize that the power to weight ratio is strongly in favor of the former and that, not surprisingly, it provides electrifying performance on the road. Unseen in America before, it offers a multitude of opportunities from fast road touring to display. With all the cues of both the most important eras of Bugatti production, the looks of the early sports cars and the pivotal and iconic 'straight eight' power-plant which within two years would form the basis of all Bugatti Grand Prix cars, the Type 35, this is an immensely historic milestone in the tale of the Bugatti marque which we are very proud to offer for sale."

    ANOTHER EPIC FRENCH CAR. TYPICAL BUGATTI, IT IS ONE THING AND YET IT ISN'T AND CONTAINS MANY PARTS OF QUESTIONABLE PROVENANCE BUT WHAT IT HAS IN SPADES IS IT'S A REALLY COOL PIECE OF KIT. IT'S THE SORT OF CAR THAT WILL SORT THEN MEN FROM THE BOYS AND THE WOMEN FROM THE GIRLS. 1.5 MILLION MAYBE. WILL BE GOOD VALUE WHATEVER.
     
  18. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Timothy Russell
    17 - 1966 Ferrari 206S Dino Spider #026. Gooding. Saturday. Lot 034. Estimate 2.6mil.+

    Lot description -

    "By mid-1967, Ferrari turned over its remaining vehicles to private teams. This example, chassis 026, was sold directly by SEFAC Ferrari to the Swiss Scuderia Filipinetti. It was first raced by them at the 12 Hours of Sebring on April 1, 1967, driven by Herbert Müller and Günter Klass, with the car displaying no. 34. The two drivers performed well in practice and qualified 15th despite mechanical gremlins limiting straight-line speed. Race day saw Müller and Klass charging hard, running as high as 10th Overall and challenging the class-leading Porsches until Müller suffered a cracked suspension bushing, and consequent braking problems on lap 63 going into the fourth hour of the race. While no longer in contention, Müller and Klass pressed on and were forced to settle for 49th overall out of 61 entries. After Sebring, chassis 026 was returned to the Ferrari factory for service and sorting in preparation for the Nürburgring 1000 Km slated for May 27, 1967. The SEFAC Ferrari team driver, Jean Guichet, was paired up with Müller, and as at Sebring, chassis 026 wore no. 34. In practice, the Dino suffered an undetected fuel leak and an engine fire erupted as Guichet approached the remote Hatzenback Woods. Guichet pulled off but was unable to extinguish the flames, which severely damaged the engine, gearbox, and much of the rear bodywork. The damaged racer was sent to Switzerland to Scuderia Filipinetti to await repairs; however, the damage was such that repairs were deemed not worth the expense. In October 1967, chassis 026, untouched and unrepaired, was sold as part of a package with Ferrari 412P chassis 0848 to highly respected Ferrari collector Pierre Bardinon. Mr. Bardinon kept the car as such until Italian Ferrari enthusiast Corrado Cupellini purchased the complete car, still in its untouched state, from Bardinon in 1983. Next, Cupellini initiated and completed a lengthy and comprehensive restoration, with direct assistance from Ferrari. Interestingly, the engine supplied by Ferrari was an ex-Tasman Series 246 F2 unit mated to a Hewland transaxle. As equipped, Cupellini raced the car on several occasions, including the 1995 Tutte le Ferrari event in Mugello, the 1996 Ferrari Spa Days, and in Shell Historic Ferrari Maserati Challenge races at Nürburgring. Shortly thereafter, the car was purchased by Bernie Carl of Washington, D.C., who sent it to Terry Hoyle Engineering in Malden, UK, for restoration. That project included installation of an original ex-SEFAC factory team Tipo 231 B 206 S engine (no. 15) with rare twin-spark-plug ignition and fuel injection – delivering approximately 220 bhp – matched with a proper Tipo 537 gearbox. Subsequent owners read like a Who’s Who of the classic Ferrari world, including Chris Cox, who purchased 026 from Mr. Carl in 1998 and would own it twice more during the 2000s. Others include Jim Spiro, who tested the car at least twice at Willow Springs Raceway in 1998 and 1999, David Scaife, Katsu Kubota, Christian Biggs, and finally Peter Klutt, who purchased the Dino in December 2012. At the 2013 Concours d’Elegance of America, it was awarded the Gerald Roush Trophy for Most Significant Ferrari. Blessed with unbroken and undisputed provenance, this Dino 206-026 was also the subject of detailed examination by noted Ferrari expert and historian Marcel Massini. Mr. Massini spent two days at the Legendary Motorcar facilities during the summer of 2014, during which time he thoroughly examined the Dino’s chassis with a high level of scrutiny. Using the information on the chassis, he systematically compared it to the detailed photographs that he himself took of the car while at Pierre Bardinon’s residence in 1983. Among the many tell-tale items reviewed, Massini reviewed the individual locations of various mounting brackets, rivet holes, hangers, and welds, plus patina and other significant details. Mr. Massini’s findings were conclusively stated in a letter that accompanies the sale of Dino 206-026. “After spending two days of thorough inspection, I have come to the conclusion that this can only be the old original frame from 1967. Every point, from front to rear, match to the photos I took in 1983. The only tubes that show evidence of change or repair are the upper tubes to support the engine. Other than these, I believe the chassis is completely original.” In addition to Mr. Massini’s letter, the Dino is offered complete with copies of Mr. Massini’s detailed images, the historical report he compiled on the car, and an abundance of photographs depicting the car throughout its well-known history. As such, it represents a simply wonderful and irreplaceable part of Ferrari’s rich and glorious competition legacy."

    A LOVELY EXAMPLE OF A USABLE LITTLE FERRARI. ALL THERE AND A FAIRLY HONEST EXAMPLE POST A SEVERE FIRE AT THE NURBURGRING IN 1967 THEN STORAGE TIL 1983 BEFORE A FULL RESTORATION BY CORRADO CUPELLINI WITH FERRARI ASSISTANCE. NON ORIGINAL BUT CORRECT ENGINE AND BODYWORK. MASSINI REPORT GIVING CONFIDENCE. WELL WORTH THE LOW ESTIMATE OF 2.6 MILLION.
     
  19. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Timothy Russell
    18 - Ferrari F333SP #020. Gooding. Sunday. Lot 140.

    Lot description -

    "The 333 SP presented here, chassis 020, is among the very best examples from this important series of Ferrari prototype racing cars. According to the research of Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, 020 was constructed by Michelotto in early 1998 and originally finished in Fly Yellow, a vibrant and relatively uncommon livery. In March, the new 333 SP was sold to the Auto Sport Racing Team based in Lugano and headed by Swiss enthusiast Enzo Calderari. In addition to Calderari, who has successfully raced GT cars since the late 1970s, the team’s primary drivers were Angelo Zadra and the noted female racer Lilian Bryner. In its debut race with the Auto Sport Racing Team, 020 achieved a remarkable 1st in Class and 2nd Overall finish at the 1000 Kilometers of Monza, a race that counted toward the Italian GT Championship. Following this successful outing, the 333 SP was actively campaigned in the highly competitive SR1 category of the International Sports Racing Series (ISRS), a European-based series for open-cockpit sports cars. By the end of the 1998 season, the Auto Sport 333 SP had captured top five finishes at Paul Ricard, Misano, Donington Park, and Anderstorp, and placed 4th in the championship standings, with 45 points. To close the successful 1998 season, the Ferrari was entered at the 6 Hours of Vallelunga, another Italian GT Championship race, where it repeated its result at Monza, finishing 1st in Class and 2nd Overall. Prior to the start of the 1999 season, the ISRS series was officially recognized by the FIA and renamed as the Sports Racing World Cup. As in the previous year, 020 was successfully campaigned by the Auto Sport Racing Team, finishing in the top five at Barcelona, Pergusa, and Brno, and placing 6th in the championship standings with 48 points. Beyond its participation in the 1999 SRWC series, the Auto Sport Ferrari took part in the legendary 24 Hours of Daytona, placing 4th Overall in a race dominated by 333 SPs, which took three of the top five positions. The following year, the 333 SP returned to Daytona for the 24-Hour race, but failed to finish due to gearbox problems. Following its two-season racing career, the 333 SP was sold to Phil Bennett, a pioneering enthusiast who assembled one of the great collections of contemporary GT and sports prototypes. In more recent years, 020 has resided in a prominent Texas-based collection and has seen minimal use. With the exception of a Shell Ferrari Historic Challenge race at Moroso Speedway during the 2008 Cavallino Classic weekend, the 333 SP has not been raced or exhibited. Presented in its distinctive Auto Sport Racing Team livery and offered for public sale for the first time, 020 is among the most important Ferrari sports racing cars of the modern era and a true prize for forward-thinking collectors."

    A VERY GOOD EXAMPLE OF A LATE PERIOD SPORTS RACING FEZZA. RACED WITH SOME SUCCESS AND STILL IN FAIRLY GOOD NICK. ONLY QUESTION WOULD BE THE QUESTION OF USABILITY. IF YOU ENJOY TRACK-DAY'S IT WOULD BE HILARIOUS FUN. WORTH THE 2 MILLION.
     
  20. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Timothy Russell
    19 - Porsche 904GTS #904-006. Gooding. Saturday. Lot 056.

    Lot description -

    "Nine of the first 10 Porsche 904s built were kept for works race team use, including the car offered here, 904-006. Chassis 006 was first put into service during April 1964 as one of four entries by Porsche in the Targa Florio. An accompanying letter sent by Porsche and written by historian Jurgen Barth to Scott Gauthier, a former owner of 006, notes that 006 was the overall winner of the Targa Florio. That history was later changed in Mr. Barth’s published work on the 904 to a 2nd Place result, perhaps highlighting the sometimes-difficult task of historical attribution of race results to 904 chassis numbers. Regardless, the car had a spectacular result at the Targa Florio, either driven by winning drivers Antonio Pucci and Colin Davis or by the 2nd Place pairing of Herbert Linge and Gianni Balzarini. In its second outing for Porsche, 904-006 was driven by Herbert Linge and Gerhard Mitter at the 1,000 Km Nürburgring. against diverse international competition, the pair finished 12th overall. Next came the 24 hours of Le Mans, where 904-006 was driven to 10th overall and 3rd in Class by the duo of Gerhard Koch and Heinz Schiller. after finishing 4th overall and 2nd in Class at the Tour de France, 904-006 raced in its final event as a factory entrant at the 1965 Monte Carlo Rally, driven by Eugen Bohringer and Rolf Wütherich and placing 2nd overall. According to Mr. Barth, Porsche sold the car to Fa. Gasner & Co. in Munich, Germany, in 1966. The trail then goes cold on 904-006 until it was purchased, possibly from a used car lot, by orange County Cadillac dealer Leonard Renick. Then the 904 Carrera GTS, now missing its engine, went through the hands of two more owners before being purchased by Gerard Layer. Mr. Layer sourced an appropriate type 587/3 engine and transaxle and had the car restored, eventually selling it to The Ferrari-Cobra Wars author Michael Shoen in January 1997. Mr. Shoen, an accomplished author and historian, says he never used 904-006 during his one year of ownership and sold it to Scottsdale-based collector and jeweler Scott Gauthier in January 1998. With Mr. Gauthier, the 904 was to become a cornerstone of a very significant collection of sports racing cars. Upon arrival to the collection of Stanley Gold in 2000, 904-006 took a turn from occasionally used display piece back to its natural role as a competition machine. Mr. Gold had his friend and master technician Brant Parsons of Shamrock Racing prepare the car for track use and, over the course of his 14-year ownership, this Porsche was entered in no fewer than 27 vintage racing events, including three Tour Auto appearances, six trips to the Le Mans Classic, and four entries at the Monterey Historics. Now offered from one of the world’s preeminent Porsche collections, 904-006 remains ready to capture the imagination of a new owner looking for either a track machine or a stunning showpiece. This car is an approachable classic that will continue to be eligible for entry into events all over the world. Porsche’s legend has grown through the years, and the importance of its role in the annals of motor racing history cannot be overstated. The 904 is a key element in the lineage that built such a legend, and it now offers the modern enthusiast an extremely useable platform and dynamic ownership experience. With only 107 examples of the 904 Carrera GTS built, and only nine ever used by the factory for competition purposes, 904-006 finds itself at or near the top of an elite list of desirable racing Porsches. With known ownership and exemplary recent stewardship and competition successes, this simply must be one of the most desirable 1960s racing Porsches available today"

    A FAB RACING PORSCHE THAT CAN ALSO BE USED ON THE ROAD. GREAT RACING HISTORY INCLUDING 10TH AT LE MANS. NEW OEM ENGINE OTHERWISE PRETTY HONEST. A TOTALLY COOL LITTLE CAR AND GREAT VALUE COMPARED TO AN ITALIAN CLASSIC. WELL AND TRULY WORTH 2.25 MILLION, POSSIBLY A LOT MORE.
     
  21. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Timothy Russell
    20 - Maserati 450S #4505. Rick Cole. Lot 1200.

    Lot description -

    "The first Tipo 54, chassis 4501, initially had a 4.2-litre V-8 installed. Chassis 4502 was equipped with the 4.5-litre and sold to Parravano in October 1956 along with Indianapolis engines numbered 4201 and 4202. While Parravano was undoubtedly one of Maserati’s best customers, owning up to 17 competition cars at one time reportedly worth $500,000, he was sought by the FBI for income-tax evasion and fled to Mexico in 1957, never to be seen again. The first “Works” 450S racing cars were Chassis 4503 and 4505, plus the 350S-derived V-8 development “mule” now numbered 4501. The Buenos Aires 1,000 km, the first race of the 1957 season on January 20th would confirm the competitiveness of the 450S. The heavily modified chassis 4501 was the entered by Maserati for Fangio and Moss. While they decisively led much of the race, clutch problems slowed them until the transmission failed to force their retirement. On March 23rd at the Sebring 12 Hours, Moss co-drove a Maserati 300S with Harry Schell to a second-place finish. Fangio and Behra co-drove the lone 450S, chassis 4503, to overall victory. Not only was it the Tipo 54’s first win, the margin of victory was by more than two laps! Chassis number 4505 is documented as having left the factory on May 8, 1957 as the factory`s “Works” entry for Stirling Moss and Denis Jenkinson to drive at the Mille Miglia on the 11th and 12th of May. As the record-setting victors there for Mercedes-Benz in 1955, the pair were favored to repeat their extraordinary feat for Maserati in 1957. Moss qualified fastest, but Behra crashed 4503 heavily during practice. The Moss/Jenkinson car, s/n 4505, was also equipped with a high-speed overdrive or dual-range gearbox engineered by Valerio Colotti and engaged by a separate gear lever for high-speed use; however, after less than 10 racing miles, the car was out of the race with a broken brake pedal that sheared off at the root. The next event was at the Nürburgring on 26th May, where 4505 was entered for Fangio and Moss, but on the 10th lap, a half-shaft broke and a wheel came off, with Moss spinning out of contention, but fortunately with no further damage to either the car or driver. The use of 4505 for Moss/Jenkinson was later confirmed by ‘Jenks’ in an article published during 1974 in Trident, the quarterly newsletter of the Maserati Club. The history of the Tipo 54 cars becomes somewhat unclear from this point, with acknowledged marque historians in varying levels of disagreement.

    What seems clear is that some swapping of chassis numbers occurred at Maserati, a not uncommon practice during the era to navigate around import duties between races and to deal with inevitable crashes, race damage, and repair times. Consequently, the chassis numbers of various cars were swapped from damaged or unavailable cars to race-ready cars as required for their all-important carnet (customs paperwork) and logbooks, and entered into races under the existing entry forms already assigned for specific cars to compete under. Chassis 4503 had not yet been repaired in time for the Nürburgring event and it seems that 4504 was entered there as 4503. This car was taken over from Harry Schell and Hans Herrmann by Fangio and Moss only to retire when the fuel tank mounts broke. Similarly, at Le Mans in 1957, it is recognized by marque historians, including Maserati expert Joel E. Finn, that the car which led the race with Jean Behra and André Simon driving was in fact 4505, even though the official entry listed the damaged chassis 4503, which could not possibly have entered the race in its state after the Mille Miglia practice crash that Behra suffered with it.

    Further credence for this theory is gained from a 1974 article by Dennis Crump in the pages of Trident, the Maserati Club quarterly newsletter, in which he wrote, “As described previously in the notes on 4503 at Le Mans, 4505 may have run with its number. It’s very difficult to determine as 4503, 4504, 4505 and 4506 have virtually identical bodies with the lipped radiator opening.” Among knowledgeable Maserati fans, Mr. Crump was very well-placed to weigh in on the subject of the 450S and its various examples and racing entries. Not only was he a driver and the founder of Sotheby’s motorcar division, he was a friend of none other than Denis ‘Jenks’ Jenkinson, the renowned MotorSport magazine writer who partnered with Stirling Moss on many events including the Mille Miglia. For the aforementioned Trident article, Crump consulted Jenkinson, who in turn utilized his copious handwritten notes he made in period on the various 450S cars and their sometimes confusing and often-intertwined histories. As discussed by Crump’s Trident article, Jenkinson referred to a notation that the engine for chassis 4505 was installed during April 1957. He also stated, “I don’t think there is any doubt that the factory used 4501, 4503 and 4505 for the works team in 1957 and 4503 was the original hack.” There was also some conjecture about Maserati’s Costin-bodied coupe co-driven by Moss and Harry Schell at Le Mans in 1957, which has since been confirmed to have been based on chassis number 4501. In any event, the Maserati entered as 4503 (badly wrecked by Behra at May’s Mille Miglia) quite likely 4505, was driven by Behra and Andre Simon and moved into the lead by the first hour’s end. However, late in the second hour with Simon at the wheel enjoying a comfortable lead, a universal joint seized, ending a promising early run.

    Later during 1957, 4505 was purchased by TempleBuell, Jr. of Denver, Colorado, with the engine opened up to 5.7 liters. Reputedly, the 4505 deal was made at the same time Buell purchased 4508, which is understood to have been during early October 1957. Engine modifications and testing took longer than expected and 4505 was not ready until early 1958. According to a 1976 Trident article on 450S history by racing Maserati author and expert Joel E. Finn, 4505 was entered as the factory entry into the 1958 Cuban Grand Prix, an event made more dramatic by the kidnapping of Juan-Manuel Fangio, the car’s assigned driver, by Communist guerrillas. Maurice Trintignant replaced Fangio at the start in 4505 and in the confusion following the crash of a Ferrari into a crowd of spectators by Cuban driver Armando Garcia Cifuentes’ Ferrari 500 Testa Rossa, the race was stopped with Trintignant’s actual finishing position unclear. Soon after, Buell sold 4505 to Jint Hall of Midland, Texas, who raced the mighty Maserati a few times before selling it to John Edgar, who already owned 4506. According to Finn, Carroll Shelby drove 4505 for Edgar, with the car numbered 78 at Palm Springs on November 1st and 2nd 1958, where he won the feature race. Shelby also drove 4505 at Nassau on December 7, 1958, running well there until the car could not be restarted after a pit stop. With that, the front-line racing career of 4505 appears to have ended. So too, did the front-line international use of the 450S, which was rendered obsolete in one stroke at the end of 1957 by rule changes cutting maximum engine displacement to 3.0 liters. Additionally, the debacle at Caracas on November 3rd 1957 added insult to injury with two works 450S cars, a special 4.7-liter entry by TempleBuell, and a 300S all damaged or destroyed, influencing the Orsi family to temporarily withdraw the factory team from racing. Maserati 450S, chassis number 4505, is believed to have been raced until 1960 when it crashed badly at Riverside.

    It passed through several owners, including Joel Finn, who acquired the remains in the 1970s and eventually sold it in 1980 to Virgil Millette, who in turn sold it in 1986 to Stephen Forristall. A total restoration was subsequently completed by Pebble Beach winning restorer Mark Goyette, with all of the Fantuzzi-style bodywork and much of the chassis painstakingly remade, with the restored car incorporating items salvaged from 4507, which crashed at Caracas in late 1957, plus proper mechanical components and a 4.5-liter V-8 bearing a faint “4505” number stamping on the valley near the front of the engine. Other items include new seat belts, an onboard fire system, and a removable head fairing enclosing a removable roll bar. While certainly impressive under power, prudent racing practice would of course dictate a thorough inspection of the car and its various vital systems prior to any contemplated vintage-racing or long-distance touring use. Recently, the current owner/consignor of this 450S has filed for, and received, newly-issued FIA paperwork, ensuring that with proper race-preparation, 4505 could provide an outstanding entry into some of today’s most desirable classic touring events. Of course, those events include today’s touring-oriented Mille Miglia, the site of 4505’s racing debut with Moss/Jenkinson in 1957, where 4505 was the fastest qualifier and therefore the last car that to leave the famous podium at the final competitive running of the Mille Miglia."

    IF THIS WAS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT QUESTION IT WOULD BE THE BEST CAR OFFERED OVER THE WEEKEND. ULTIMATELY THERE ARE QUESTION'S TO THE POINT THAT THE CAR MAY CONTAIN VERY SMALL AMOUNTS OF #4505 OR ANY MASERATI BUILT 450S. STILL IT'S THE ONLY CLAIMANT TO BEING #4505 AND IT IS FIA APPROVED. OFFERED BY RM IN 2008 WITH AN ESTIMATE OF 1.6 - 1.8 MILLION AND NOT SOLD. RICK COLE OFFERS NOT ESTIMATE BUT I BELIEVE THE OWNER MAY WANT CLOSER TO 3 MILLION AND WHEN A FAIR DINKUM EXAMPLE WOULD GO 20 OR EVEN 30 MILLION MAYBE THAT IS GOOD VALUE.............
     
  22. sperry

    sperry Karting

    Aug 6, 2013
    106
    Great commentary timmy!
     
  23. BIRA

    BIRA Formula Junior

    Jun 15, 2007
    889
    BEST CAR OF THE LOT, i am not biased, used to own it! and i posted spirited Tour Auto driving on mountain road in this post!
     
  24. Timmmmmmmmmmy

    Timmmmmmmmmmy Formula 3
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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Full Name:
    Timothy Russell
    That is really great to have someone with first hand information commenting on this thread. Far too many great cars being offered makes it difficult to limit to 20, why not 100...... It is one of the best 250LM and certainly the best publicly available.
     
  25. cscott

    cscott Formula Junior

    Dec 31, 2002
    476
    New Orleans
    Full Name:
    Chris Scott
    Thanks for the data. That is 11 cars from the 1950's, 39 from the 60's, 24 from the 70's, 16 from the 80's. 12 from the 90's, and 14 from 2000 on.

    That compares to the 102 last year with the breakdown as follows. 50-9, 60-52, 70-19, 80-7, 90-6, and 2000 on 7.

    So we see a continued movement forward in age. More than 50% of the cars are 1970 onwards which was not the case last year.
     

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