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Nasty Road "Salt"

Discussion in 'Other Off Topic Forum' started by whart, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. whart

    whart F1 Veteran
    Honorary

    Dec 5, 2001
    6,485
    Grandview NY
    Full Name:
    Herr Prof.
    What is this stuff? Real "salt" is no longer used; this sticky white stuff, in granules or crystals, seems to stick to everything, doesn't really melt, creates great gaseous clouds when driven over (that fukin' whiner, Bloomberg will jail people for secondhand smoke, but is covering us in this toxic white "stuff" in NYC) and, it coats your shoes, and everything you walk on. Chemical composition? Health hazard? Or just another disgusting biochemical from the folks that brought us SUV's and synthetic tomatoes. (BTW, i can taste this stuff in the air- i am going insane!) Anybody else a little irked, or should i see my psychopharmacologist real soon?
     
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  3. Challenge

    Challenge Formula 3

    Sep 27, 2002
    1,532
    PA
    Full Name:
    Kevin
    Whart I'm with you. I'm a southern boy uprooted and living in PA. I've never seen this stuff either...it creates a white film on your shoes that looks like you've been wading in birthday cake. More infuriating is that here they use "cinders" (down south we call it gravel) in addition to chemicals on the roads in winter. These are cool because they never disappear; they'll pepper your car all spring.
     
  4. Enzo

    Enzo F1 Rookie

    Feb 14, 2002
    4,077
    MinneSOta
    Full Name:
    Pat Pasqualini
    I invite anyone to come to Minnesota and see what fun we have in the winter. In addition to salt which they only use down to a certain temp they use other chemicals that will melt down to -35 below (or somewhere on that side of 0). They also like to throw sand at us every chance they get, so when winter is all done and gone it takes them about another month to pick up all the **** that is left on the streets. Salt is only good to about 10 degrees or something like that and that is why they start to mix it with other chemicals to attack the ice and snow.

    Just my .02

    Pat
     
  5. tifosi

    tifosi F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa

    Sep 5, 2001
    5,382
    texas
    Full Name:
    Tom D
    sounds like some good stuff - this weather sucks
     
  6. Matt LaMotte

    Matt LaMotte Formula 3

    Oct 30, 2002
    1,868
    Pensacola
    I feel sorry for you guys. Just the other day I was hanging out at this place a few miles from my house and there was white stuff all over the ground. Lucky for me though they call it beach sand.
     
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  8. Auraraptor

    Auraraptor F1 World Champ
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Sep 25, 2002
    11,467
    MO
    I hate how it slowly cakes up on the windshield. kafjkahsdjfajsf. I use wayy to much washerfluid up to keep it clean.
     
  9. Ed P.

    Ed P. Formula 3

    Dec 28, 2002
    2,177
    Long Island
    Full Name:
    No Longer
    I think what they are spreading up here is a mixture of sand and calcium chloride. Which is salt, just not the type you put on food (sodium chloride).
     
  10. Mule

    Mule F1 Rookie
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Jun 25, 2003
    3,517
    Alaska
    Full Name:
    Mule
    How about these:

    Alaska uses volcanic ash which is black and hard to get off your car. Also eats brake rotors. I went through 3 sets in 5 years. You must use a cleaner wax two or three times during the winter, just so your paint doesn't feel like sandpaper.

    South Dakota uses an invention by the Black Hills School of Mines. Just like kitty litter. No corrosive effects, and they place huge barrels of it at the bottom of hills in town. Self-service.

    Colorado uses gravel. Doesn't melt anything and the peices are increaesed in size each year, since the anti-pollution people lobby that if they are too small, they create more dust. Usually ball bearing size, and Coloradans don't believe in mud flaps. Windshield repair business is booming. I have replaced three in two years. No street sweepers, so a nice dirty road until late spring.

    In Denver, on the highways, they use a red fluid that is usually used on aiport runways. It is very hard to remove from paint, and stays sticky on the road long after the snow is gone. If you are driving on it and it is fresh, the fumes will come into your car and make you sick.
     

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