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Need your feedback on this 328 that is for sale

Discussion in '308/328' started by MikeInPeoria, Dec 29, 2020.

  1. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
    18
    Full Name:
    Mike Hernandez
    I would like your feedback on the following 1987 328...

    https://www.hyundaiofnewport.com/used/Ferrari/1987-Ferrari-328+GTS-2eca69350a0e0adf27ffbffc50ba4291.htm

    According to the salesman, the 328 hasn't had a major service since 2014. Overall, it looks like it's in excellent condition. It does have the notorious hood bend/imperfection where the strut is attached.

    I'm considering taking a look at it over the weekend, but I'm a little concerned that it has sat for quite a while.

    What advice can you give me? This might be my first Ferrari purchase and I've been wanting a 1987/1988 for quite some time.

    Thank you in advance!
     
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  3. ginoBBi512

    ginoBBi512 Formula Junior
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    #2 ginoBBi512, Dec 29, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2020
    Look, the 328 is a fantastic car, but they are old , and they require a lot of money to get them sorted, especially when they sit. So get a PPI,. if things check out, buy it, drive it, and maintain it. Ive had mine for 21 years, and have spent at least 40- 50,000 to keep it up to my high standards. My car has 102 K miles,and it runs as good as it did with 20k miles, thats because I spared no expense. Look at my post on the thread, " What have you done to your Ferrari today " or you 3x8. I have detailed everything i did to the car, what It needed ,and what I elected to do over the 21 years , this will give you an idea of what was done at the 99,000 mile mark. My car is now at the dealer .Fuse board rebuild, 2400.00 Labor, parts, four wheel alignment, 350.00 . Windshield replacement , 1500,oo, which my insurance paid, 350.to install. plus I had a fuel pump issue, and a smog , I think the bill was about 2300.00 which included replacing my fog light bulbs.

    Thank you
     
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  4. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Thank you! I really appreciate it.
     
  5. ginoBBi512

    ginoBBi512 Formula Junior
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    Oct 9, 2016
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    Keep in mind, the 87s do not have the improvements of the 89, thats bull****, your best option for that money is to BUY AN 89 PERIOD, they are the very best cars since their inception in 1976, mine is also and 89 .

    Thank you
     
  6. todd cloud

    todd cloud Rookie
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    Jun 21, 2019
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    Todd Anthony Cloud
    $20,000 too high. $75,000 is about right.
     
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  8. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    I agree. It seems in the last few months there are several similar 328s being listed in the $90's. Maybe it's a trend based on demand? Who knows.
     
  9. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    I love the 89s except for the wheels, but the convex are starting to grow on me.
     
  10. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Thanks!
     
  11. todd cloud

    todd cloud Rookie
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    #9 todd cloud, Dec 29, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2020
    This is how to buy a 328.

    Buy it or another excellent condition 30,000 mile 328 for around 75K.

    Spend 5K for full service at a trusted and known shop.

    Spend another 2K on some minor items that need to be sorted out, typically stemming from poor decisions made by the last knucklehead technician

    Once the car is sorted and in good hands, spend 1K a year on fluid flushes and oil changes

    Drive it 1500 miles a year to keep it in good working order. You will have zero regrets.

    I have a 1987 328 and a 2013 458. The 328 gets more attention when she comes out of the garage.
     

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  13. f4udriver

    f4udriver Formula Junior

    Feb 1, 2012
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    Central Illinois
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    Mike G
    I bought my 1981 GTSi after it was sitting for 12 years or so. If I remember correctly it was 13K to get it safe and driving and then I replaced all of the suspension bushings. Guessing that was about $4 to $5,000. I did not get a PPI since it was actually my old car and the price I paid accounted for a lot of work to be done.

    I had Michael B who is in Peoria Illinois do the initial work. He did a great job for me.
     
  14. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Thanks! I stopped by Michael B's place (Kauth & Mayeur) last week to meet the staff for the first time. I'm happy to see there's a shop 5 mins from my house.
     
  15. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Thanks! Beautiful cars!
     
  16. topcarbon

    topcarbon Formula 3

    Nov 3, 2006
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    K&M is who I trust with all my cars
     
  17. moysiuan

    moysiuan Formula 3
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    That looks like one of the better examples around, at least from a cosmetic perspective. Looks like it has been detailed, and not driven much, but enough miles to keep it reasonably active which is good and necessary for a car. If it has sat too long, the problems you might have would be oil leaks, eg. the shift shaft and differential seals, the cam seals, cracked cv boots and perhaps some bearings that when static the seals can harden and allow moisture in but the bearings would still take some time to fail. But it probably would simply need a thorough inspection, and lubrication of various bits like throttle cables, shifter mechanism, gas pedal bearings, door hinges, etc. and then off you go. Probably useful to disconnect various electrical connectors, clean them with Deoxit and remove the potential for electrical gremlins. Of course with age some things could fail compared with a new car, eg. the ignition coils, water pump, the heater valve for interior heat would not be uncommon failure items. But if if gets used regularly it could prove to be a very usable classic.

    With the age, one should budget for new fuel hoses for safety, as original hoses would not handle alcohol fuels, it is not a big job but does take some fussy labour to do it well. The fuel distributor and other parts of the fuel injection system could also have rubber internals deteriorated, fixable but sometimes hard to diagnose. Make sure the tires are not too old, if the tire date code is older than 10 years they should be replaced regardless of how they look.

    I can't comment on price, but I do think the 1987 with concave wheel and no abs makes it appealing long term, and while the 1989 did have some improvements, the 1987 would be the pick for me, the abs long term will be a repair and rebuild nightmare compared with a conventional braking system. I expect the car will attract a premium price because it looks so nice at a glance. There are lots of less than stellar cars out there, and the market may well be pricing condition more accurately as these cars are becoming very old and many examples are somewhat tired or missing bits, not have the tool kits, interiors worn out, were stored outside, etc.

    Looks like with proper purchase inspection and a few proactive service items you might have a real prize here.
     
  18. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Great info. Thanks!

    I found two others: 1. An '89 with 29,000 miles that just had the 30k service completed by the dealer 2. An '88 with 23,000 miles that is going to throw in a complimentary 30k service for the buyer
     
  19. todd cloud

    todd cloud Rookie
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    Go with the 88 and ask them to come off the price a bit and have the service done yourself at a shop you know and trust
    There is no such thing as a “just completed” or “complimentary” service involved in buying a 328
    To think otherwise is a fools errand.
    You must sort the car yourself.
    If spending 5K or more after the purchase is an issue then a classic Ferrari is perhaps not for you.
     
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  20. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    Good advice. Thanks, Todd.
     
  21. todd cloud

    todd cloud Rookie
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    Jun 21, 2019
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    In reading back over that post my concluding sentence may have been a bit sharp
    The best situation is to find a well serviced 328 coming up on its 5 year service that the current owner would rather avoid doing
    Have the service done while in your ownership and you are good to go
     
  22. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    All is well, Todd. Thanks for the suggestion!
     
  23. miketuason

    miketuason F1 World Champ
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    You sure you don’t want a 308? :)
     
  24. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Yep :)
     
  25. topcarbon

    topcarbon Formula 3

    Nov 3, 2006
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    Was thinking the same
     
  26. rocket50

    rocket50 Formula 3
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    Purchased my 88 328 about two years ago and prices were going down then. My car was listed at 100K but sold well under that. Can't really see that prices would be climbing in the current state of things. Just did my major service this year with a few other things being addressed as well. The previous owner did not want to keep the car with the major coming up. Great bargaining chip. As previously said, negotiate the price down and take care of your own servicing. PPI is a must. Even if you are told otherwise by the dealer or seller. It may save you thousands in repairs that you won't catch but a professional will. Best money you can spend on an old Ferrari is the PPI.

    Good luck with the search and enjoy when you decide to pull the trigger. They are so much fun to drive.
     
  27. MikeInPeoria

    MikeInPeoria Rookie

    Nov 23, 2020
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    Mike Hernandez
    I'm actually looking at 308s and 328s now. I just can't decide between the two.
     
  28. moysiuan

    moysiuan Formula 3
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    Nov 1, 2005
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    The look of an 85 QV is hard to beat, especially with the more vintage interior/controls which tends to suit the car best. Probably that last run out year of the QV has some enhanced collectible potential, as it is the most refined of the purest style of the 308.

    But for actual driving the extra torque and flexibility of the 87-89 model engines are meaningful, and there were some running improvements. See this service bulletin and recall summaries for some of the detail changes on the 328...http://ferrari.cdyn.com/ferrari_docs/328_bulletins.pdf and http://ferrari.cdyn.com/ferrari_docs/328_recalls.pdf

    Tough call, the 84 or 85 QV (euro spec typuically preferred by collectors) would be my collector pick, the 87 concave wheel version is next best for looks, and the 88-89 (Swiss CH model having some special mechanical features so perhaps the ultimate example of the series) where the final years build quality was viewed as among the best Ferrari ever has achieved, much like Porche and Mercedes of that era for their marque. As I think driving is the main point of owning these cars, getting the 88-89 would be the best bet.
     

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