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OK, The Rear Axle Is Off and What Is Molicote?

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by donaldh2o, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. donaldh2o

    donaldh2o Karting

    Nov 10, 2003
    143
    Irvine CA
    Full Name:
    Don
    Just removed the driver side rear axle on the '76 308 to replace the broken boots. Wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. First thing I did was jacked up the rear driver side of car, put wood blocks under the frame and removed the wheel. (Caution if you're gonna do this, wear clothes that will be thown away. The grease and filth are unbelievable.)

    Got to the inside bolts by joining all the 1/2 inch drive socket extensions I had in the tool box to make a single 24" extension. This is so you can work right at the rear wheel and not under the car. Used an 8mm hex socket. Whacked the end of the 24" extension with a hammer to rattle the bolts, then used the Craftsman 1/2 inch drive breaker bar to break the bolts loose. Then the 1/2 inch drive rachet to remove the bolts.

    Got to the wheel side bolts buy putting the breaker bar and hex socket in between the A-arm and the frame. Then went to the rear of the car and used foot power to break the wheel-side bolts loose. No room to hammer here.

    The key to this job is doing one bolt at a time, then rotating the wheel so the next bolt is near the top (for both the inside and wheel-side bolts). This is done by making sure the car is in neutral gear and using the hand brake to keep the axle from turning while torguing, then releasing the hand brake to rotate to the next bolt. (Large screwdriver in the edge of the brake rotor makes rotating the wheel easy.)

    And you have to use 1/2 inch drive socket tools here, 3/8" is just too flimsy for these bolts.

    Will buy the boots this afternoon, but what about the grease? The manual calls for Molicote BR 2. What is that and can't I just use axle grease? And how much?

    Saw a little trick for extending the life of these boots. After repacking and reassembly, you put a nylon cable tie around each crease in the boots to keep them from expanding when traveling at high speeds. Guess it could work???

    Also, the manual does not specify a torque for reassembling this mess.
     
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  3. rexrcr

    rexrcr Formula 3

    Nov 27, 2002
    1,572
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Full Name:
    Rob Schermerhorn
    Molicote is a molybdenum disulfide based lubricant. You want CV (constant velocity) grease, available at any parts store. Don't use wheel bearing grease, totally different application, totally different type of bearing.

    Repacking CV joints is the next to worst job, falling just behind brake caliper rebuilds for messy/nasty factor.

    Inspect the ball bearings for scoring, the races too. Scored balls (and we all know how painful that can be) can be replaced individually for a couple of bucks.

    Undersize balls (here we go again...) can be fitted to tight CV joint assemblies for less friction, little known racing preparation technique.

    For road car applications, whatever CV grease available at the corner parts store is great. For race applications or high HP modifications, better stuff can be had. I recommend NEO synthetic, or Krytox (nasty, nasty, noxious stuff).

    Best regards,

    Rob Schermerhorn
     
  4. donaldh2o

    donaldh2o Karting

    Nov 10, 2003
    143
    Irvine CA
    Full Name:
    Don
    Thanx for the info Rob.

    This job is taking longer than I thought. Finally have the new boots and they came in a kit with new retainer rings, clamps and the grease.

    Cleaned the bearings up with diesel fuel then sprayed them several times with brake parts cleaner. They look almost pristine. My shafts look good and there's no scoring, discolorations or flat spots on my balls. So I will be packing and reinstalling the shaft this weekend.

    The shaft end of the new boots look a tad smaller than the old boot and I'm thinking that's because the old boot has been stretched a bit. After all, it's been on the shaft since 1976.

    I guess it's normal that the new boots will be a tight fit on both the shaft and bearing ends.
     
  5. pma1010

    pma1010 F1 Rookie

    Jul 21, 2002
    2,559
    Chicago
    Full Name:
    Philip
    Don
    Yes, those bolts are lots of laughs to separate when they've been on the car for 25+ years and heat cycled like crazy. I did mine about 2 months ago. I'd try and get some good CV grease. My shop had the stuff that is OEM on Audi's or similar. Book has the amount for each side. It was slightly more than 1 tube from memory. And, I thought the Workshop Manual does have torque specs for the bolts.

    On your other point about messy. Worst for me has beenwhen the diff seals and engine mounts leak...what a mess. But no, I don't think you've really had "fun" till you've used carb dip. I had my shop buy it and clean the carbs. Even they complained about the smell! Takes the oils out of your skin like nothing else they tell me. Carbs are nice and shiny though!

    Philip
     

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