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RobzWorkz Special Project: 328/Mondial Fog Light Full Assembly Construction

Discussion in '308/328' started by Robz328, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    Rob Hemphill
    #1 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Welcome FChat!

    It's been a while since my last RobzWorkz 328 project deployment. Fret not, I have been busy and I have a new accomplishment to share. I am pleased to present:

    The full development and construction of the 328/Mondial Fog Light Assembly!!!

    You heard it right! This is for a Left Hand Side LH 328 version assembly (RH and both sides for Mondial are in the works). This current work comprises a full 2-YEAR effort (part-time, of course...I have a real job;) to complete the following:

    1. Disassemble an OEM (Left Hand Side-LH only for now) fog light unit;
    2. Discern the material types and operation/installation;
    3. Utilize moldmaking methods to fabricate (opaque and clear) plastic, and rubber parts;
    4. Test casting materials to optimize material choices;
    5. Source fasteners, electrical materials, and sealing materials;
    6. Construct connector bodies and solder wiring harnesses;
    7. Assemble and verify electrical operation;
    8. Install into a Ferrari 328 for in-car testing.


    A SPECIAL THANKS TO Randall Gatz (porphy)

    If it were not for the magnanimous gesture from Mr. Gatz, a Mondial owner and FChat Silver member, to make available to me OEM fog light assemblies for both the Mondial 3.2 and the 328, I would still be seeking a materials sponsor and my 328 would have no hope of evolving past the use of 1968 Mustang front turn signal lamps (no fogs). Randall has been a Ferrari fog light enthusiast for a long time, has extensive knowledge of the assemblies' variations, including European types, and makes for an excellent peer-reviewer of the current work.


    FYI, everything present in the pictures of this post is for the assembly I made (I placed it on a white background to emphasize the point). This includes manufacture of all clear and opaque plastic items (I cast thermoplastics and sourced no glass for this assembly) and rubber parts. I also had to cast connector bodies since OEM are NLA. Things I didn't make comprised the metal parts and LED aftermarket bulbs (I did solder the wiring to achieve OEM proper connectivity to my vehicle).
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  2. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #2 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    These are pictures to disclose the assembly electrically “bench tested” and installed into the car. The intention now is to drive the car normally—about 50-100 miles per month—and monitor the condition and operation, noting issues and improvements that can be incorporated during new developments. Note the fog bulb works in the flash mode as well (hence headlight and parking bulbs also on).

    One improvement that will be applied includes tighter and reinforced ball connector sockets on the fog bulb reflector. Three ball-and-socket sets are used to retain the reflector while allowing azimuth and elevation adjustments for angular alignment of the fog light beam. The best ball connectors I could find were, in appearance, the same size as the OEM (which are NLA), but are perhaps a couple of thousandths of an inch less than OEM. I noticed this when I was sealing the fog light bulb access: the reflector popped off and could be reinstalled while in the sealed body. So far, with a good, spirited drive, the reflector did stay in place with no issues. However, I desire a long life cycle, with minimal statistical failure rates. Strengthening and extending the socket assemblies should improve the retention of position for the fog bulb reflector. This will be vetted when I make Mr. Gatz’s Mondial LH version (the next effort).
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  3. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #3 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Pictured here are a variety of molds and parts during my 2-year effort to make excellent, long-lasting pieces. My small closet is just over half full of “final” molds (suitable for production) and a variety of parts suitable for remolding, testing, and use. The closet will be filled when I complete development of the LH side assembly development.

    Every piece produced requires a strong, low-shrinkage mold and a good casting material. I experimented with several mold materials until I settled on good quality platinum-cure silicone for the plastic parts (clear and opaque) and tin-cure silicone for the rubber parts. All the molds shown are for the LH side only; many will be reproduced for the RH side as appropriate since they are for “reflective” parts. FYI, the only differences experienced between the 328 and Mondial are the signal and fog lens sizes: the 328 lenses extend farther out than those for the Mondial. All other parts were alike, including the connectors.

    Many pieces required “interim molds” so I could reinforce and modify plastic and rubber parts as necessary. A primary example is the fog reflector assembly: I made interim molds so I could modify the apiece for using an updated aftermarket LED with a conventional bulb socket vice the OEM (very hot) incandescent bulb with special socket integrated into the reflector itself; I also added the capability to allow for aftermarket fasteners to replace the OEM (and NLA) ball and socket <script id="gpt-impl-0.0869588551238874" src="http://partner.googleadservices.com/gpt/pubads_impl_78.js"></script>design; my design used a new source of ball connectors readily available and used with new fasteners.

    Many parts are shown herein as well. I investigated several materials for both the hard plastics and the rubber pieces. Over time, I will try new materials and processes as appropriate, especially when mitigation is necessary. Some parts, such as the main body, were “beefed-up” using blue modeling clay to add volume during moldmaking so as to improve final product durability. I beefed-up several of the OEM designs. As with molds, many “interim” parts were fashioned as a developmental necessity; this was especially true for rubber parts, where the inside volumes needed to be finalized in plastic so as to allow for replication in rubber parts during final casting.

    As with the mold materials, I conducted testing to determine best choices. I did several sets of destructive testing on main body and fog reflector castings by dropping some castings from the 2nd story of my house and by dropping a 16lb bowling ball onto other castings. My material selections comprised the castings that shattered least during the tests. FYI, I found the biggest challenge for the clear lens material choices was not strength, but in thermal characteristics: many materials analyzed, although cited as being useful for lenses, had such a low thermal deflection temperature, that they sagged when washing in hand-tolerable hot water…definitely a “no-go” condition.
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  4. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #4 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    With this post, I begin describing some greater detail of the effort, beginning with the disassembly of the OEM body that Randall Gatz sent to me. Most of the disassembly was inconsequential, in that cleaning and reassembly were easily accommodated without rework. However, some cutting and breakage did occur, as will be seen. The caveat below is for those seeking to repair their own OEM assemblies:

    “Be sure you are ready to repair before tackling the disassembly of anything.”


    Mr. Gatz’s OEM body had seen a lot of use. The main body and other hard pieces (assumed to be made of injection molded ABS plastic…all were black in color with paint applied as design assessed) were in good shape, retained their strength and were easily cleaned for reuse. All fasteners were excellent and reusable. All rubber pieces were easily cleaned and reusable as well. However, the white clips retaining the rubber wiring covers were aged and easily broken; replacement would comprise small zip ties or sourcing new OEM clips.

    Since the lenses had already been removed, I have no pics of lens removal. The signal/parking lens is detached with screw removal: there is the lens and a spacer (in gray or white), often called a bezel; gaskets are present as well. The larger fog light lens is permanently attached with an industrial adhesive. Mr. Gatz said to use MEK to remove. I haven’t done this yet; however, Mr. Gatz did send me a full Mondial RH side with lenses attached. When I disassemble it, I will post the fog lens removal.

    Special note to would-be restorers: The item comprising the most fragility was the fog reflector assembly. This item consists of a metal reflector assembly (three parts fastened together--the reflector and 2 sides) with the rear attached by rivets to a (very) brittle clear plastic material wherein was molded a metal bulb socket. This clear plastic had ample age/use cracking, especially where the rivets were located. This plastic part also had the ball connector sockets molded into it; these easily broke when being removed. Therefore, rework before reuse is necessary (FYI, I discussed with Mr. Gatz before doing anything posing risk of breakage; we will be discussing how he wants me to refurbish this part of the OEM assembly he sent).

    Removal of the electrical wiring for the signal/parking circuit requires some cutting of wire and grinding of the signal/parking bulb socket mounts. These 3 sockets are permanently clipped with bent tabs into the main body; removal requires grinding off the tabs; replacement would utilize soldering/adhesive methods. To finally remove the socket assemblies also requires cutting the wire terminals; reinstallation would require soldering work (note: to ensure good bulb connectivity, when re-soldering, be sure to use large beads of solder on the tips that touch bulb circuit taps). Removal of the fog light bulb required no cutting; the connector lines can also be removed from the access door by removing the grommet (necessary for casting a new access door later).

    The signal/parking bulb circuits overlap in that the middle bulb has a 2-curcuit network (two terminals on bottom of bulb); the middle and outer bulbs have metal reflectors permanently attached in their main body housings. To remove these, a cutoff wheel was carefully used to remove the plastic retainer tabs. These reflectors were also well-used, having ample swirl marks. Reinstallation is with adhesive.

    Disassembly of the OEM fog light is a little tedious and destructive. For those who would consider doing this, patience is essential and anger far-removed. Be sure to prepare for reassembly before disassembly. With this disassembly task, it is easy to see that the OEM fog light assembly was meant to be “consumable” and replaced vice repaired during normal 328/Mondial market deployment.

    Additional Caveat: when purchasing a refurbished fog light assembly, be sure that the internals, especially the fog reflector, have been reinforced/refurbished to allow for a reasonable amount of in-car use. Simply replacing the lenses is not a sufficient refurbishment of this item. Also, replacing the fog lens with a plastic version is NOT advised if using the OEM fog bulb, which would likely get very hot and cause deformation/discoloration of the lens. This is why my finished work is suitable ONLY for aftermarket LED bulbs, which release less heat than the incandescents.
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  5. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #5 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    My earliest efforts to develop the moldmaking process and choose plastic and rubber materials was with reproducing small parts. This includes the following:

    Small Plastic Parts:
    1. Fog reflector positioning translation arm;
    2. Fog reflector positioning translation arm sliding mount (cross-shaped piece);
    3. OEM-based fog reflector socket inserts;
    4. Small signal bulb reflectors;
    5. Fog Bulb access panel;
    6. Connector bodies;
    7. Attachments to the fog reflector to facilitate new LED bulbs.

    Small Rubber Parts:
    1. Rear bulb socket covers;
    2. Access port to fog reflector translation components;
    3. Curved air vent tube



    The pictures show several developmental stages for plastic parts fabrication. Final versions were cast in black. For the translation arm and sliding mount, I decided to beef up the volume so as to exploit the improvement of material properties; thus final versions are thicker and filled-in when compared to OEM. WRT, the ball socket inserts, recall I want to allow for different designs as developments continue without having to reproduce an entire fog light reflector for each design. FYI, the inserts were designed after making the 2nd-stage interim fog light reflector itself; pics comparing to OEM are shown. The attachments to the fog reflector comprise a retainer ring inside the reflector, a screw-on receiver on the back, and a screw-on cap to retain the new bulb in place; I utilized a garden hose connector set to make the screw-together parts. Connector bodies were beefed up and tabs added to aid with gripping and maintaining installation position; an additional mold set was made to align the connector blades within the connector bodies during final assembly.

    Rubber parts required complex intermediate plastic shapes so as to optimize design, thickness and facilitate mold inserts for casting inner volumes. Plastic inserts were designed for the bulb covers and the curved vent tube molds in the final stages to facilitate shaping their inner volumes.

    A note about gaskets: instead of making reproductions of the OEM gaskets (long and skinny ones for the rear fog bulb access panel, the signal bezel and the signal lens), I chose a suitable “squishy” platinum-cure silicone material that was poured into the gasket areas and allowed to cure in place. Thus I did not have to design a long skinny gasket, and it would conform the part shape and make an excellent seal. Other sealing agents were used during assembly: RTV to retain bulb sockets, connector wires in bodies and small reflectors; raw glazing silicone was used for retaining/sealing the fog light lens and as an applied added seal on the poured gaskets where appropriate. In-car testing will reveal if my choices were acceptable.
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  6. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #6 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    I gravitated to large parts after ample development of the small parts so as not to spend too much money on moldmaking materials. This is also the reason I designed the fog reflector with insert-capability for the ball connector sockets; I could utilize available connectors without redesigning the full reflector itself, which could become a costly process. Here are the large parts;

    Large Plastic Parts:
    1. Fog light main body;
    2. Fog bulb reflector;
    3. Signal/parking lens extender/bezel;
    4. 328 signal lens;
    5. Mondial signal lens;
    6. 328 fog light lens;
    7. Mondial fog light lens (not completed; awaiting a sample).


    (Lenses will be described in the next post)

    The first large part addressed was the fog light reflector. This was an intense development, especially since the OEM part was fragile and I didn’t want to disassemble it. The OEM also included a large, early-design, incandescent (halogen?) bulb assembly with a socket, a secondary reflector, and a clip mechanism, all molded into the clear plastic backing of the full assembly. Significant age cracking was present. In order to fabricate a reproduction, I made an interim mold from the OEM. Afterwards, I reworked the interim casting with added plastic sheet material and removed the entire bulb socket assembly by continuing the curved surfaces of the reflector down to a point. After post material (slag) removal, the final casting would have a hole to be worked to facilitate a new LED bulb as an insert. This access is much smaller than the OEM. See the small parts post for the added pieces made to facilitate the new bulb. The final casting was done in black and silver painted for the reflector (I plan to research new methods for silver/chrome coating the reflectors without having to resort to electroplating; for now, since the surfaces are in an enclosed environment, the chrome spray will suffice).

    Reproducing the main body was more straightforward, only much larger (my biggest mold). Since I was using a casting thermoplastic vice an ABS injection molding process (requiring a significant amount of tooling), I decided to thicken areas of the main body with blue modeling clay when casting the mold so as to exploit the material strength in the product casting. Pics are shown of the OEM body with blue clay for providing the reinforcement volume. The white sample shown was one of my material samples which was destroyed during testing. The final casted part was cast in black and comprised the best responding material after tests were completed. Finishing the main body included slag removal, drilling pilot holes for fasteners and painting the inside an aluminum color with clear coat similar to OEM.

    The signal/parking extension/bezel reproduction also required an interim mold. The reason was to facilitate using thicker materials (exploiting the thermoplastic properties), and removing the necessity to have the special aluminum tubing clipped into the part was is present with the OEM version. Recall, as part of my effort, I was trying to disassociate the need to construct the full fog light assembly with having to use special milled fasteners which would be NLA nor having to reproduce these fasteners with machine work. For the extender, the tubes were replaced with thicker material in which holes could be drilled to facilitate long screws (FYI, OEM also used long screws for the fastening; it was the use of the aluminum tubes I replaced, thus preserving the design functionality of the part). The material properties thus replaced the function of the tubes, that is, to align the long screws with the body and lens parts, and to reinforce the fastening of the assembly. The final piece was not colored black, but natural since I fully sprayed it with chrome paint inside and out (FYI, some in the field would say to spray chrome onto black for the shiniest results; this was not necessary for the extender since the internal surfaces posed no significant reflection surface for operation, but only to allow for lens extension, replacement and multi-use [for both Mondial and 328 versions]; in fact, I was expecting that the chrome inner paint would minimize the loss of operational brightness). To facilitate handling the part, I topcoated the outer surfaces with clear; top coating any chrome/silver significantly diminishes the shine, but allows for handling (which is why I only used the clear for the outside surfaces). As with the reflectors, I will research newer method for chroming as development proceeds.
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  7. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #7 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Although lenses were included as large parts, their manufacture was different enough to warrant explanation in a new post. Two types of lenses with two sizes for each are present: the smaller signal/parking lens and the larger fog light lens, each sized large for the 328 and smaller for the Mondial, both versions having the same footprint so as to fit in the body and extender pieces without rework. Currently, I have casted three of the four for the LH assembly; I only require to complete the Mondial fog light lens to facilitate both LH assemblies. Current work was completed with US version lenses with US DOT markings and patterns. I have not made molds for other versions. However, for nominal use (not for “Concours” events), this is certainly functional enough and attractive. FYI, I applied color on the signal lens like for the Euro version, since I like that color scheme better.

    WRT colors, when I first casted signal lenses, I tried to incorporate color within the material. Results were unsatisfactory, in that the color was present but not sufficient to be of uniform appearance in the light. Thus, I discovered that clear orange spray paint was quite suitable and used that for the signal lens. To construct the 328 versions, since Mr.Gatz didn’t have them, I purchased some knock-offs from Ferr Parts (FP). These were of substandard quality, and I could tell they had been sprayed. To make better, I reinforced the FP LH lens and fixed the malformed fastener holes. Final castings were of excellent shape and patterns for my work. After casting in clear, I masked the lens and painted on the Euro look.

    Thus both the fog light and signal lenses were casted in a clear epoxy. All materials investigated were quite good WRT the clarity of the final product. Some were supplied with UV protectant as well, however, only time would tell about how the clarity would hold, so the in-car testing will be the method to check that (I do have a UV light and will see if I can cause discoloration, but I doubt it would be representative of use, especially since the full assembly is under the front bumper and generally not in direct sunlight). The clear epoxy material property that caused the most limitation to my selection process was the thermal deflection temperature (TDT), namely the temperature where the material starts to sag. So far, I found one material with a suitable high TDT so as not to deform when washing by hand in “tolerably hot” water. At present, I don’t think any casting epoxy is available that could be run through a dishwasher without deformation, but the one with the highest TDT thus far should be suitable for in-car use and for hand washing. The next level would be the polycarbonates, but, I’m certain that this would not entail an “at-home” methodology (need tooling and industrial mfg. facilities, just as with using injection molded ABS for the opaque plastic parts). FYI, some of the pics show the fog lens cast in yellow; this was done for testing purposes in that the yellow casting comprised low TDT materials; I only used to review the shaping of the castings and not for in-car use.
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  8. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #8 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    The electrical work consisted of wiring together the bulb sockets with the connector assemblies in like manner as the OEM circuit. Recall, I discussed making connector bodies in the small parts description. The signal parking circuit is fairly straightforward if you see the OEM construction and think about the double-use for the center bulb. The fog bulb wiring is very simple, comprising only one bulb. My wiring was completed successfully with 14 gage wire and soldering vice crimping; however, I only used readily-available colors. Heat shrink is used throughout. Wiring within the connector bodies was “cemented” in place with RTV. I incorporated bullet connectors to each connector body so as to allow for reuse of OEM connectors as appropriate without disassembling the bulb sockets. Zip ties were used to tidy it all up.

    Afterwards, I conducted bench testing with good success, However, I noticed that the setup would cause a partial voltage to light the outer signal lamp at low strength when applying voltage to the center lamp connector blades. After some research, I discovered that the signal lamp is grounded when the parking circuit is energized without a turn signal request, thus preventing the turn signal light from illuminating. This was verified with an in-car connective check. Wiring successful! Refer to previous posts to view more of the bench and in-car light operation tests.
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  9. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #9 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    The assembly process comprised sourcing readily available fasteners suitable for completing the assembly while retaining proper functionality. Also, final assembly included “permanently” installing the fog lens and sealing signal light parts and fog bulb access parts.

    Long threaded screws were sourced for attaching the signal/parking lens and extender to the body. For the signal lens, I made a short aluminum spacer and incorporated an O-ring so as to minimize surface wear in the signal lamp screw holes. Main body holes for these long screws retaining the lens pieces were tapped.

    As with OEM, large holes were drilled through the main body to facilitate long screws to attach the body to the car. This is done with the signal lens pieces remove (removing the signal lens is also how to reach bulbs for replacement during normal use). These screws are held by captured nuts located in the car. There are two of these, one at each top corner of the main body, and are floating to optimize the position of the fog light assembly relative to the front bumper. One of mine was missing, so I sourced a Mylar replacement.

    A design characteristic for the body to cat emplacement is the use of a single fastener to retain the main body planarity with respect to the car. This was located on the rear, lower inner (towards car centerline) part of the main body. The design for OEM utilized a ball end screwed into the main body and socket riveted onto one of the car’s mounting spars. I did not have these available (NLA) and chose a long screw with locknut to serve as an adjustable stanchion. I will be researching to finalize this connection point during subsequent in-car tests (thus far, no issues).

    The remaining fasteners were all to support the installation and tilt adjustments for the fog light reflector body. There are three necessary ball connector used: two that enter the main body from the rear, and one that connects the translation arm to the reflector body. Additionally, fasteners were selected to operate the translation arm from the front; this included me modifying a piece to retain the adjustment screw to the body while facilitating translation arm adjustments.

    Installing the fog lens was done with raw silicone adhesive. This should be acceptable since I used to use it for installing stained glass windows (thus strong enough) and since silicone can be cut with a razor blade to facilitate removal (no weird chemistry to remove: just cut and peel should be the case). Other sealing comprised poured gaskets with silicone to finalize as appropriate.
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  10. Robz328

    Robz328 F1 Veteran
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    #10 Robz328, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    The completion of the LH full fog light assembly is a substantial milestone in my personal effort towards automotive self-actualization. This was a pleasure to figure out and well worth the effort, especially considering the rarity of available replacement units. FYI, when I discuss the rarity of 328/Mondial replacement fog light units with others, I usually say that they can be found in some warehouse next to the Ark of the Covenant. Price…doesn’t exist.

    Of course, my goal is to completely outfit my 328 since mine had no fog units when purchased. I do plan to provide to owners. However, I haven’t devised a company or methods to market at present. For now, if I were to make a new piece and/or improve an old OEM for someone, I would simply use the “time and materials” cost model and pay taxes on “hobby income” to stay legal. Licensing may not become an issue since: a) I had to redesign much of the entire assembly, and b) no provision, save for aftermarket lenses, is present to source these to anyone from the industry. Since the “CARELLO” name is on the lens casting, I may provide at cost only. Depending on Fchat responses, business planning is therefore TBD.

    Special Final Remark: This effort has demonstrated that fog light reproduction is more art than manufacturing method. I often found myself comparing my casting results favorably with the OEM while still needing to fit by hand with some degree of post-casting work. So, it’s like the car itself, a Limited Edition Artwork.

    My final deployment picture is a FOG LIGHT IN SPACE!

    Enjoy!
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  11. Pero

    Pero Formula Junior
    Silver Subscribed

    Apr 22, 2011
    749
    Sweden
    Full Name:
    Peter R
    Really really impressed. Wow!
    Peter
     
  12. theunissenguido

    theunissenguido Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    Jan 21, 2004
    1,495
    Argent/Brasil/Blgium
    Full Name:
    Guido
    Thanks Rob (and Randall) for your efforts to do this. Many 328 and Mondial owners will see you as a Saint.
    Where do you want your Statue ?
    When will you know prices ? Will you sell lenses separate also ?

    Guido
     
  13. FCnew

    FCnew Formula Junior

    May 5, 2015
    671
    Hong Kong / Canada
    Full Name:
    Jonathan
    .

    Amazing work. !
     
  14. MvT

    MvT F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    May 25, 2013
    3,775
    The Netherlands - NH
    Full Name:
    Tijn
    Very sweet Rob! :D I like the assemblies a lot! Really nice work! What's the HDT of the assembly?
     
  15. Dr Tommy Cosgrove

    Dr Tommy Cosgrove Two Time F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    May 4, 2001
    29,802
    Birmingham, AL
    Full Name:
    Tommy
    There is a special place in Heaven for people like you :D
     
  16. Jeff328

    Jeff328 Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 5, 2006
    2,241
    WI
    Simply incredible.
     
  17. godabitibi

    godabitibi F1 Veteran

    Jan 11, 2012
    5,999
    La Sarre, Quebec, Ca
    Full Name:
    Claude Laforest
    Can't believe that! You have a LOT of determination. Great work!
     
  18. Mule

    Mule F1 Rookie
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Jun 25, 2003
    3,488
    Alaska
    Full Name:
    Mule
    #18 Mule, Dec 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Very nice work! I think the big issue in the past with new lenses, was getting the old ones off. Since you are creating the two sides of the coin, you can attach them as you please with some sort of plan to replace if necessary.

    I think I have a right side (US passenger side) assembly with a broken lens from a 328 if it needs to get into your Skunk Works shop. Let me know.
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  19. Basal Skull

    Basal Skull Karting
    Silver Subscribed

    Oct 26, 2010
    163
    Vancouver BC
  20. Tricycle

    Tricycle Formula Junior

    Dec 21, 2004
    636
    LA Cnty 4,083sqmiles
    You sir, are insane....in a good way :)
     
  21. ronfrohock

    ronfrohock F1 Rookie
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Aug 16, 2004
    2,865
    MA
    Full Name:
    Ron Frohock
    Awesome work! As said in the Mondial section, I hope you sell many examples of these wonderful assembly's. I know that there hare many hours and a significant amount of money involved on making these. I hope you find it worthwhile.
     
  22. Todd308TR

    Todd308TR F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Nov 25, 2010
    9,894
    LA
    Full Name:
    Todd
    Wow! How do you know how to do this(damn Euro keyboards, whereàs the question mark)
     
  23. maurice70

    maurice70 F1 Rookie

    Jan 25, 2004
    3,886
    Sydney
    Full Name:
    maurice T
    Very,very impressive..will be looking forward to seeing when the next chapter ie the RH side one is complete as well
     
  24. skelly

    skelly Formula Junior

    Mar 24, 2011
    282
    Fantastic work! It must be a real pleasure to see the result after all the hours I'm sure you spent achieving it. I'll buy a complete pair if you do go forward with production.

    As always, thank you for sharing all the photos.
     
  25. Verell

    Verell F1 Veteran
    Owner Consultant

    May 5, 2001
    6,984
    Groton, MA
    Full Name:
    Verell Boaen
    Congrats Rob,
    That's one massive piece of work!!

    You're right on in going with LEDs, the HDT of available 2-part transparent resins just isn't high enough to withstand the heat generated by incandescent fog light bulbs.
    That leaves either LEDs or HIDs.
     

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