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SSD Drives over 5 years old

Discussion in 'Technology' started by Innovativethinker, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. Innovativethinker

    Innovativethinker F1 Rookie
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    Aug 8, 2009
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    If you have an SSD that is 4-5 years old, you may want to consider replacing them now.

    Just sayin.
     
  2. fatbillybob

    fatbillybob F1 World Champ
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    Aug 10, 2002
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    I thought no moving parts so bullit-proof? So old school hard drives with disc and needle prevail? I have had old school things last forever.
     
  3. tomc

    tomc F1 World Champ

    Apr 13, 2014
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    Care to elaborate?
    We have some archival data on SSDs.
    Thanks
    T
     
  4. Innovativethinker

    Innovativethinker F1 Rookie
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    I've been buying SSDs since 2013, and they are now failing. I've had both crucial and intel drives fail.

    Not allot of options when they do fail, I've tried this to no avail: https://dfarq.homeip.net/fix-dead-ssd/

    The reality is that SSD drives have only so many writes, in 2013, a 250 gig drive was $450, and a 90 gig was $125, so we didn't get big ones. This may have effected the number of writes we had available.

    Here is a decent article on lifespan of an SSD: https://www.ontrack.com/blog/2018/02/07/how-long-do-ssds-really-last/

    Perhaps "lifespan" is a poor choice, more like "usage limit". When you hit that limit it degrades or stops. Since we had smaller drives, and every drive was used at least 40 hours a week, and just about every article I've read points to 5 years of use, so I have used up the effective life of my drives.

    We also never shut off our computers, so whatever stupid stuff windows does while idle, including gigs and gigs of updates, may have contributed to the death of the drives.

    Be aware that just about every SSD manufacturer has a utility to monitor the remaining life of your ssd drive. If you are using them I strongly recommend you download and run it.
     
  5. Innovativethinker

    Innovativethinker F1 Rookie
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  6. Innovativethinker

    Innovativethinker F1 Rookie
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    If they are stuck in a data safe you probably don't have to worry, although we always create at *least* two copies and place them in separate physical locations.

    If they are in a live system, I would create copies and stick those in a data safe.
     
  7. tomc

    tomc F1 World Champ

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    OK, thanks. We have redundant backups of critical data: SSDs, DDN storage array (I think that's the jargon our system guys uses), hard drives, etc...T
     
  8. Wade

    Wade Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Glad I'm not one of those who implemented a cloud/RAID solution relying exclusively on solid state drives.
     
  9. David_S

    David_S F1 Veteran
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    Think I've had 2 old school platter type drives fail. One was probably 12 years old, the other was quite a bit older than that.

    None of the HDs in any of my systems I'm currently running are LESS than 5 years old, but none of them are SSD, either.
     

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