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Throttle cable 400i

Discussion in '365 GT4 2+2/400/412' started by tr0768, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. tr0768

    tr0768 Formula Junior

    Oct 28, 2008
    715
    maltby wa
    Full Name:
    Howard Musolf
    It appears that I will be needing a throttle cable in the near future, Any thoughts on where to purchase one. The outer sheath is fine but the inner is beginning to fray.

    Howard Musolf
    tr0768
    1981 308gtsi
    1982 400i Cabriolet
    Maserati Spider
    2 many brass era cars
     
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  3. dstacy

    dstacy F1 World Champ
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    Jan 23, 2006
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    Dave
    Sure thats an easy one. It is #108760. McCann has one in stock for $48.
     
  4. tr0768

    tr0768 Formula Junior

    Oct 28, 2008
    715
    maltby wa
    Full Name:
    Howard Musolf
    Dave,

    Once again thank you for your excellent input. I will order the new cable tomorrow. I drove the car today up to where Candy's birthday party will be held. The Ferrari will be hidden until the proper moment.

    Although I have only driven this car some150 miles everytime I get behind the wheel I'm impressed. This is a wonderful road car steady and true at most any speed I've been able to attain. I just keep wondering why Ferrari never made this avalible to the Us market. Certianly this would have been a great seller at the price.

    Howard Musolf
    tr0768
    1981 308gtsi
    1982 400i cabriolet
    Maserati Spider
     
  5. dstacy

    dstacy F1 World Champ
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    Jan 23, 2006
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    Dave
    No problem Howard, anytime.
     
  6. dstacy

    dstacy F1 World Champ
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    Jan 23, 2006
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    Dave
    They wouldn't pass emissions. They also wouldn't pass the DOT & NHTSA regulations. Some 400's had crash bars added to the insides of the doors, marker lights added, cats added, foglights rewired, O2 sensors, and a wide variety of other things done to them in order to meet federal regulations. Some of them sailed through in very close to factory new condition. Who knows why some got through so easy while others were picked apart? It was the late 70's and early 80's, my suspicion is there was some serious "payola" involved on some cars.
    Both of the 400's I've owned had very little done to them in order to get them into the country.
     
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  8. SouthJersey400i

    SouthJersey400i Formula 3

    Mar 14, 2007
    1,353
    Romulus, NY (Finger Lakes)
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    Ken Battle
    Dave
    You should see the "5 mph" bumpers that were added to mine; I think I could crush a Yugo at 10 mph and come away unscathed. They significantly increase the polar moment of inertia of the car. They changed the mounting brackets to accommodate the 1/2" thick full width steel plate! I have a couple ideas on how to keep them at a much reduced weight, but that has not hit the 'must do' list yet.
    Ken
     
  9. Ashman

    Ashman Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Sep 5, 2002
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    John
    It is somewhat amazing since the addition of the automatic transmission was done with the U.S. market in mind but I guess that Ferrari chose not to keep pace with U.S. regulations for that series. During the 1978-1986 time frame Ferrari imported U.S. versions of the 308/328 series and the Berlinetta Boxer but no V12s. My guess is that they did not want to certify the V12 in addition to the V8 and the Flat 12s.

    During the gray market boom of the 1980's the requirements to become an approved converter/importer were fairly loose and there were dozens of shops performing federalization work. After a few years it occurred to the Feds that not all of the shops were doing the work well and since then they have reduced the number of approved shops to a handful with much tighter control. Having a lot of shoddy shops do the work doesn't explain how some cars got through the DOT/EPA testing standards but that is my recollection of that era.
     
  10. tr0768

    tr0768 Formula Junior

    Oct 28, 2008
    715
    maltby wa
    Full Name:
    Howard Musolf
    In the Sate Of Washington they decided to sub the emissions testing to a private contractor. These test stations are supposed to be certified and equal. When we were servicing Jaguars, MG's and Austin Healys with SU's, we could take the same car to 3 different test stations and get 3 totaly different readings. A test station located near the city of Seattle would fail most SU equipted cars. If we drove north to Lynnwood some 15 miles north most of the failed cars would pass with no adjustments made. If we had a car that failed there we would drive another 20 miles north to Marysville and have it tested there and again without adjustments it would pass.

    So today with the fuel injected computer controlled cars the same thing is true. Go to different test stations and get different readings. We have over the years figured the reason for the different readings was elevation, clearer air, and different setting in the state regulated machines. As you drive noth to these different test stations the elevation changes some 750 ft. The station at Marysville is near Puget Sound and gets fresh air off the water. We gues that had something to do with the pass/fail rate.

    I'm guessing in this state the reason some 400's would pass and some fail was the inconsistancies of the test stations and the location as well.

    Howard musolf
    tr0768
     
  11. dstacy

    dstacy F1 World Champ
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    Jan 23, 2006
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    Dave
    Yep Howard I have a few stories about some of my cars that are pretty close. Too funny.

    For those of you lurking in the background I've published this before; yes you can get your 400i to pass emmisions in your state. You'll need a 3mm T-handle allen wrench, a wax pencil, and some patience. Here is how you do it.
    1) The car has to be warmed up.
    2) When in doubt, read #1 again
    3) Insert 3mm wrench in the small hole near the fuel distributor boot. Do NOT push down.
    4) Use the wax pencil to mark the tube and the wrench so you'll know where you started.
    5) Turn 1/2 turn and mark again. Don't remove the wrench until you've marked the tube.
    6) Test. You should be pretty close to passing. Your car will be running like crap and the temp will start creeping up a bit, but you'll be ok.
    7) If you fail do #5 and #6 again except only turn 1/4 turn this time. If you pass line up your marks and turn back to the start point and then log on to Fchat and send the the email everyone does. The subject line always reads, "Wow Thanks Dave it worked, I passed!"
     
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  13. blkprlz

    blkprlz Formula 3

    Mar 24, 2007
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    Bruce
    A tidbit: Counter-clockwise to lean
    Dave;
    I remember you mentioning setting your levels to 1.6%, before I adjusted them I was running close to 2% & it didn't take much of a twist to get to 1.6....I don't even think I went 1/12 rev to get it down. I think 2% is too rich, I remember seeing carbon deposits on my pistons when I last changed my plugs (which was after I adjusted CO). I'm now thinking of bringing my levels down a little closer to 1% to clean them up. I would definitely recommend a sniffer (Gunson or similar), take those readings too much below 1% could risk overheating & burned up pistons.
    B.
     
  14. Ashman

    Ashman Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Sep 5, 2002
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    I assume you are talking about a car without cats, right? Because with fresh new cats from Amerispec installed when I brought my car to CT the car passed CT emissions in normal road tune with ease, huge margins in fact.

    It's academic now that my car is more than 25 years old as it is now exempt from emissions testing in Connecticut.

    My car has the feature to take out the cats and replace them with test pipes for, ahem, "track" use.

    Those cats are resting quite comfortably in a cabinet in my garage.
     
  15. blkprlz

    blkprlz Formula 3

    Mar 24, 2007
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    Bruce
    Good move!
     
  16. SouthJersey400i

    SouthJersey400i Formula 3

    Mar 14, 2007
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    Ken Battle
    Bruce
    If you local gas has changed from 5% to 10% ethanol you may be running leaner than you think now. Check your plugs first. Every plug I have looked at on all but new cars all look snow.
    Ken
     
  17. blkprlz

    blkprlz Formula 3

    Mar 24, 2007
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    Bruce
    Thanks Ken for the heads up to me & everyone out there. Because of the corrosive effects of ethanol in alum. fuel tanks when stored for long periods of time (2 mos.+), I use 110 oct. leaded fuel w/conditioners & stabilizers.
    Bruce
     
  18. tr0768

    tr0768 Formula Junior

    Oct 28, 2008
    715
    maltby wa
    Full Name:
    Howard Musolf
    Is there an additive that will neautralize the effects of corrosion in the aluminum fuel tanks? I have already welded overlays on the bottoms of my 308 tanks. I really don't want to have to remove the tanks from my 400 and do the same repair.

    Where are you able to buy 110 leaded fuel? We used to be able to purchase leaded fuel at a local airport but they got busted and now no more sales for hi performance vehicles, damn.

    Howard Musolf
    tr0768
    1981 308gtsi
    1982 400i Cabriolet
    Maserati Spider
    2 many brass era cars
     
  19. SouthJersey400i

    SouthJersey400i Formula 3

    Mar 14, 2007
    1,353
    Romulus, NY (Finger Lakes)
    Full Name:
    Ken Battle
    Most race tracks sell high octane, leaded fuel. Cost is steep even without the road tax. Put on some racing coveralls and walk up with a few large jerry cans, if they refuse to refuel a street car. (higher octane unleaded available too if you have cats)
    Ken
     
  20. blkprlz

    blkprlz Formula 3

    Mar 24, 2007
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    Bruce
    Removing them really isn't a big deal, replacing them are! My understanding about ethanol is that it'll separate & fall to the bottom after a couple of months, no additives that I know of to prevent this. There are coatings & bladders out there as an alternative, but even w/regular driving & fresh fuel, ethanol degrades the entire fuel system. Interesting results of Hagerty's ethanol article & survey a little while back.

    Call your local speed shops, I've got 2 gas stations that carry race fuel but the one has big 1000 gal. tanks. From what I've been told, as the level drops, the octane evaporates from the fuel. The station I get it from has Sunoco 104 unleaded, & Sunoco 110 & 116 leaded---ea. in a 55 gal. drum & gets delivery every Thurs. so it's always fresh. Problem is he sells out in less than 24 hrs. & the law is, leaded fuel cannot be pumped into the car, only approved containers. What you do w/it after that is your business.
    Btw, glad to hear Candy loves her new ride.
     

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