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To paint or not to paint.....

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by coolblue, Oct 29, 2004.

  1. coolblue

    coolblue Karting

    May 6, 2004
    217
    That is the question...whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of specialist work or to take arms against a sea of DIY. I am thinking of painting the wing mirrors on my rosso corsa 355B. They are a little scuffed. (its wider than you think you know!). Something like rub them down and paint with an aerosol can. Has anyone done this successfully or am I doomed to hideous failure. can't wait for a response!
     
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  3. Gary Res

    Gary Res Formula Junior

    Apr 23, 2004
    573
    Long Island,New York
    Full Name:
    Gary
    Let a professional do it. Unless you've done it before. The last thing you want your mirror to look like is that "Earl Schrieb" did it. He's the guy who paints cars for $259.00. It a Ferrari not a Pinto! Pay the couple of hundred and have it look right.
     
  4. cavallo_nero

    cavallo_nero Formula 3

    Nov 3, 2003
    1,656
    colorado
    Full Name:
    Giovanni Pasquale
    curvy mirrors can be tricky. try it yourself and if you do not like it, have it professionally done. go base coat/clearcoat though, with a good primer over the originally finish after you scuff it up with sandpaper. let dry thoroughly between coats, and find a good way to hang them while painting/drying. use polyurethene products for the finish base/clear, they are more durable and resistant to sun.
     
  5. coolblue

    coolblue Karting

    May 6, 2004
    217
    Thanks guys. food for thought. Will sleep on it (and I don't mean on the wingmirrors!)
     
  6. Lloyd

    Lloyd F1 Rookie

    Aug 25, 2001
    2,705
    Austin
    I remember looking to paint a bumber on a car that had been scuffed until I read about the dangers associated with spraying on the modern clear coat finishes. Do some research on the paint yourself. The local paint shop that was selling the modern clear coat paint had no idea of the hazards associated with this stuff. The professionals have proper respirator gear. I am a plaintiff's attorney and admittedly have become very paranoid over the years seeing what has happened to some of my unfortunate clients. (none paint related) Get an estimate from a body shop and compare it to the costs associated with the paint, the proper spray rig and respirator, and potential medical expenses.
     
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  8. rivee

    rivee F1 Rookie

    Jan 20, 2002
    3,725
    Nowhere important, USA
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    John
    coolblue, If you're just going to paint small stuff all you need is a small air compressor and a small paint gun or air brush. You can pick up a cheap paint gun for around $50 bucks. Make sure you use an oil/water trap towards the end of your air lines. The quality of your paint job depends on the equipment used. Then practice your spraying on junk panels or metal.

    After you get the equipment you get your paint. Use the 2 step process, ie basecoat/clearcoat. This is the easiest and most forgiving way to refinish something, that way if you get the clear too dry or have runs in it, you can color sand it (with 1500 or 2000 grit sandpaper) and buff it out. After you get good at it you can paint almost anything and make it look like a professionals.
     
  9. Steve King

    Steve King F1 Rookie

    Feb 15, 2001
    4,366
    NY
    Coolblue just use a little common sense here. If you paint them and it doesn't turn out good just get them done at a paint shop. Also you should be able to use a spray can and do an excellant job. If you are sensitive to the paint fumes just do it outside. This is not a major problem. I bet you can do a super job. Also this is how you learn. Enjoy
     
  10. Mike C

    Mike C F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Aug 3, 2002
    6,075
    Southeast USA
    Full Name:
    Mike Charness
    Suggestion: Figure out how you're going to do it (primer or not, single stage or 2-stage with clearcoat) and then paint something ELSE that has a curved surface, such as an old spray can or bucket. See if that turns out the way you'd like (color matches, finish good enough) before you try it on your Ferrari's mirrors. I paint racing helmets using airbrushes... it's not as easy as you think to get a good final finish with paint cans, but yes, it CAN be done to provide a good finish, though usually not a great one.

    Mike C.
    www.helmet-painting.com
     
  11. rivee

    rivee F1 Rookie

    Jan 20, 2002
    3,725
    Nowhere important, USA
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    John
    Damn Mike, went to your web page and saw your work. It's stunning.

    How did you paint the horsey on those helmets?

    Beautiful work dude.
     
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  13. Mike C

    Mike C F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Aug 3, 2002
    6,075
    Southeast USA
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    Mike Charness
    Thanks. I have the prancing horse outline in CorelDraw and use that to cut a vinyl stencil from a sheet like from vinyl sign material except it is lower tack in the adhesive. I use that as a pant mask stencil and airbrush the (usually) black horse. The (usually) white highlights are hand painted with a very small brush.

    You might find it interesting that on Schumacher's F1 helmets the prancing horse, Marlboro and other logos are rub-on transfer DECALS, not painted!
     
  14. rivee

    rivee F1 Rookie

    Jan 20, 2002
    3,725
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    John
    Go figure
     
  15. FL 355

    FL 355 Formula 3

    Nov 3, 2002
    1,665
    Ft Laud
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    Frank Lipinski
    Very nice work Mike...I'm impressed....
     
  16. Mike C

    Mike C F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Aug 3, 2002
    6,075
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    Mike Charness
    Thank you!
     
  17. coolblue

    coolblue Karting

    May 6, 2004
    217
    Thanks guys. I remember changing the rotors on my 993 because of encouragement from other Rennlist members.
    Its important for me to learn how to do these things. I think I will have a go. If I do where do I source the paint(can)? It is a '95 Rosso Corsa 355B
     
  18. TTG

    TTG Formula 3

    Jun 11, 2002
    1,551
    East Hanover, NJ
    Full Name:
    Todd Gieger
    I would never attempt myself...unless you paint for a living...."What can go wrong, will go wrong.
     
  19. rivee

    rivee F1 Rookie

    Jan 20, 2002
    3,725
    Nowhere important, USA
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    John
    Are you going to paint it out of a can?

    Pretty hard to match color with a pre-packaged container unless already mixed in Rossa Corsa for your year/make of your car . There should be a paint number under the rear bonnet like 300/12 or something like that that you need to take where ever you get the paint, because there are lots and lots of shades of red.
     
  20. fatbillybob

    fatbillybob Two Time F1 World Champ
    Consultant Owner

    Aug 10, 2002
    20,026
    socal
    Rivee,

    The hot ticket is to take your fuel door (2- 8mm nuts to remove ) to a good paint matcher and get it matched. Glasurit is tough to get consistent batch to batch. Rossa Corse 300/12 is one of 12 shades of the rossa corsa 300. Some have the 300 and extra letters to make it even more confusing. match the fuel door and that will take into account fading as well.
     
  21. Smiles

    Smiles Moderator
    Moderator Owner

    Nov 20, 2003
    14,542
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Matt F
    I guess that there aren't too many car painters on FerrariChat. ;)

    Spray can paint is quite different from professional paint, in particular because the professional stuff is mixed with a catalyst right before painting. It can also be mixed with different reducers or hardeners (depending on the temperature), or flex agents (depending on application).

    The catalyst is similar to one you'd find in any two-part epoxy like JB Weld, or even Bondo. It makes it a LOT more durable than the stuff that comes in cans.

    Having said that, there's no reason why you can't do it.

    Check out www.towerpaint.com. They can put any PPG or DuPont color into 16oz cans with a nice, professional fan tip for $15 a can.

    --Matt
     
  22. Mark 328

    Mark 328 Formula Junior

    Nov 6, 2003
    510
    Orange, Ca
    Full Name:
    Mark Foley
    Coolblue:
    Your profile is not filled-in so not sure of your location, but in Ca. used car lots have painters who come to their lots and do touch-up paint on mirrors, doors, bumpers, and other parts. If you check with a local used car lot perhaps they could recommend somebody. The next best choice would probably be to take the mirrors off and have them painted at a shop. Except for the custom-filled cans, I would not recommend a spray can job.

    Mark
     
  23. coolblue

    coolblue Karting

    May 6, 2004
    217
    Once again, I am humbled by the collective knowledge. There seems to be a large range of opinions. what now? I think I'll speak to my wrench. He always makes sense and usually has the last word.
     
  24. GearHead

    GearHead Karting

    Jan 3, 2004
    76
    It's pretty easy to paint small items like mirrors. But you HAVE to do it right. Painting out of a spray can will NOT work. As said above, auto paint has a catalyst/hardner added to it to give it durability. Can't get that with a spray can.

    Painting is actually a lot of fun. The only thing is, you have to make the investment in the right tools - you need a compressor and an appropriate gun.

    Here's how I learned to paint:

    1. There are TONS of great books out there on auto painting. Get one or two, read cover to cover, and really understand it.

    2. Go to the local auto paint shop that supplies the pro shops in your area. They will be very helpful and give you great info!

    3. Pick a paint system (PPG, Dupont, etc.), and follow the directions exactly. The paint shop will make sure you have the compatible primers, surfacers, catalysts, etc.

    4. And this is the biggest secret to home painting: Put a couple of extra coats on! That way, you can color sand and polish, and not burn through the paint. Colorsanding and polishing is the home painter's "dirty secret!" You can have all kinds of imperfections - you could have a bug in the paint - and as long as you have enough material on for a color sand, you will have a mirror finish!
     
  25. Mike C

    Mike C F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa Owner

    Aug 3, 2002
    6,075
    Southeast USA
    Full Name:
    Mike Charness
    That's very true -- and with a 2-stage paint, that really means plenty of clearcoat, 1000-grit and 2000-grit wet-dry sandpaper, and then some good polishing compound.
     

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