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To respray or not to respray?

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by dasadrew, Nov 6, 2005.

  1. dasadrew

    dasadrew Formula Junior

    Aug 1, 2004
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    Drew H.
    #1 dasadrew, Nov 6, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    My metallic blue 348 has really got quite a lot of stone chips, luggage bag scratches, door edge dings etc. I'm really undecided about a respray.

    As it's difficult on metallics to touch in the damaged bits molecule by molecule it looks like a full respray job is on the cards. What should I be looking for? Sanding back down to filler, to metal, or just sanding to provide a key for a new coat?

    At first I was thinking of a below-waist-line respray to economise but then, after looking at the original paint job (there are no signs whatsoever of a respray in the past, no overspray, no join lines, no differing textures when you ease back rubber seals etc.) it seems appalling. There are actual imperfections under the clear coat and vastly varying degrees of orange-peel surface. I know I've seen beard hairs integrated into Fiat factory paint before now, but were the Ferrari factory finishes soooo bad in '94?

    As some sections are not too bad, I could get away maybe with just a front end and engine cover for example. Does anyone have experience on such a patchwork job?

    Thanks for any advice.

    BTW, the Main Dealer has quoted 2500 Euros (~ $2000) for the complete front end including all disassembly/reassembly)
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  3. andrewg

    andrewg F1 Rookie
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    You may want to see what a paintshop thinks, but from the pics you may well get away with some localised repairs (scratch and chip people as oposed to a full panel job)
     
  4. The Don

    The Don Karting

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  5. Perfusion

    Perfusion F1 Rookie

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    In my opinion, bare metal resprays are for concours cars only. Somehow, people have gotten it in their mind that it's "the only way", but frankly, that's just not true. Especially for a car that sees regular road use (i.e., a driver) - complete waste of money.
     
  6. dasadrew

    dasadrew Formula Junior

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    so does that mean sanding to key, or sanding down to primer (to keep final overall paint thickness under control) ?
     
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  8. dasadrew

    dasadrew Formula Junior

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    I can't if the UK forum keeps on posting pics of Zymöled cars! :D :D
     
  9. FasterIsBetter

    FasterIsBetter F1 Veteran

    Jul 22, 2004
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    Drew,

    First, 2500 Euro is about $3000 at the current exchange rates. That aside, I would be very reluctant to only paint the nose/front end. No matter if they use the factory paint code or not, it is almost impossible to exactly match the rest of the car. It will look two-tone no matter how good they are. IMHO, if you're going to do it, get the whole car done.

    If you are painting the same color as original, it is not necessary to take it down to primer/bare metal. But on a base coat/clear coat finish, you have to be sure that all of the clear coat is off, or the paint won't adhere. A good paint shop will know what needs to be done and how to do it. I don't know what the differences are in Europe, but here in the US, most dealers are not the place to go for work like that. They are too expensive and usually, they send the cars out to another shop anyway to have the paint work done. Check around with other collector car clubs in your area and find out who does good work. Be sure to talk to a bunch of customers of that shop and see the work first hand before committing to have someone do your car. And get a firm quote, in writing, with the price and what they are doing.

    If it were my car, that's how I'd do it.

    Regards,
    Steve
     
  10. Philjay50

    Philjay50 Formula Junior

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    i am in the same situation with my Mondial, it is my intention to get some tin worm repairs done and then respay the whole car.
    It already has had some paint on one or two panels and it can be seen.
    I will not be completely happy until its all done.
     
  11. dasadrew

    dasadrew Formula Junior

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    Oops, yeah, I got the division and multiplication mixed up!

    Thanks. I think you're thinking what I was thinking (but rather hoping wasn't going to be necessary ;))
     
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  13. smg2

    smg2 F1 World Champ
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    Agreed! been there done that. spent well over 10k on a flawless paint job then got bored taking the car to shows. i wanted to drive, needlless to say i couldn't stand the thought of ruining a perfect paint finish so i sold the car and let it be someone elses problem.
    yeah, i could've tried to enjoy it. but when you know what it cost to do it, it makes you nervous going anywhere. i have enough stress, driving is my drug.
     
  14. Bullfighter

    Bullfighter Two Time F1 World Champ
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    Agree completely. I'd add that a superb nose repaint will make you dissatisfied with the rest of the car, even if the color match were perfect (it can be blended expertly so as to be undetectable.)
     
  15. Bandit

    Bandit Formula Junior

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    From the pictures, it looks like the paint is in overall good shape. Yes there are a few scratches and nicks, but what is there is nice and glossy. Rather than do a respray, I would take it to a paint shop and have them do a mild polishing with a rotary polisher and touch up the chips. You might be pleasantly surprised how well it turns out.
     
  16. Mark 328

    Mark 328 Formula Junior

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    Drew:
    If you had the car painted would the roads near where you live cause the same type of gravel chips to reappear shortly?
    You could brush touch some of those spots then fill in the chip with clear (either laquer or Urethane) and then sand them smooth with 600 then 1200 grit paper, and rebuff the whole car. This would cause your car to be a 6 footer (looks good from 6 feet away or 2 meters), but if you get closer you will see the chips. the bootom line is how close do you want to be able to look at the car verses how much money do you want to spend.
    The metalic colors are much more difficult to touch-up; including a respray.
    I had a Corvette that had a fair paint job on it and I drove it everywhere. Later I painted it then was affraid to drive anywhere.
    I would probably try to brush touch it a little and get a couple more years out of the existing finish. The car basically looks nice and shiny.

    Mark
     
  17. FasterIsBetter

    FasterIsBetter F1 Veteran

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    Drew,

    I've gone through the same debate that you are going through now. But I've seen too many cars that were partially done, and they just look terrible. It's so obvious that one part was resprayed and the other not. No matter how good the shop is, especially on a car that's even a few years old, the paint fading and patina just looks different. IMHO, you'd be wasting money doing a partial job. Touching up and trying to make it look okay is one thing, but to respray the front and not the rear makes no sense. You'll be unhappy and just end up having the whole car done anyway. It will end up costing less to just do it right to begin with.

    That said, I've seen some shops that do a nice job with touch up and paint refurbishing/polishing. They can do a great job, but can't hide all the blemishes. If you're driving the car a lot, this might be an alternative. Again, not something I would go to a main dealer for. Check with local car clubs for any good detailing shops in your area. It's at least worth checking out.
     
  18. dasadrew

    dasadrew Formula Junior

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    Thanks for all the information, Guys. It certainly helps to have several different opinions. Every reply up to now has been "right" - just different sorts of "right" :D.

    I now know I don't want to do a half-car professional respray, so it's down to:

    a) living with the chips - (it's a CAR, right? they're not melanomes!)
    b) getting a professional to do some minor retouching on the real scratches and chips
    c) getting a full concourse respray

    So I think I'll now do a) for the next few months whilst sorting a few other bits and pieces out on the car.
    Then in spring go to a professional for b). Probably I'll make one exception which is the front hood as that never gets seen in the same light and at the same angle as the rest of the car and would be difficult to touch-in as it has hundreds of pin-prick chips.
    I'll go for c) (or not) when I get more experience driving about and seeing what daily abrasion occurs.

    Its really been a great help bouncing the ideas of the wall for a while. Cheers!

    Drew
     
  19. mk e

    mk e F1 World Champ

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    Mine really really need paint ('84QV)and I've spoken to a couple shops about doing the job. The consensus was that although they certainly can and would spray over the old paint, neither wanted to of would guarantee the result.

    The reason they both gave it that the paint is as old that it's clearly breaking down and if the paints breaking down, they really don't trust what's underneath it. They want the paint stripped to see the metal and then start with a modern epoxy primer that they know will stray stuck. Both shops said they would be happy to let me do the stripping part which cut the price in 1/2 and putting it just about exactly were they had quoted to just spray over the existing paint.

    I talked to them about chips and ding because I drive it, and both shops felt that once there is good paint on the car, they will be able to touch-up just about anything for the next 20-30 years....when it will need to be stripped and resprayed again.

    The strip or not question seems to just be a matter to the condition of the existing paint....and mine's shot.
     
  20. bernardo66

    bernardo66 The Crazy Cat Man
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    What he said!
     
  21. quartermaster

    quartermaster Formula 3

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    Sound advice. You'll save big ($) and still have a car you feel comfortable driving.
     
  22. 4RE Bob

    4RE Bob Formula Junior

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    Was that the chocolate brown Volvo 240DL wagon? :)
     
  23. Dave

    Dave F1 Rookie

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    Paint is there to keep the metal from oxidizing.
    Just fix the few areas you need to and keep driving.
     
  24. smg2

    smg2 F1 World Champ
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    hahahaha, no that one got inpounded due to any idiot friend. it was my E12 M535.
     
  25. sandersja

    sandersja Formula Junior

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    Certainly taking off all the paint down to bare metal is much more involved and expensive than a simple repaint. A bare/sanded metal surface has to be properly prepped and primered before it will be a good base for color coats.

    While it may seem unnecessary to completely take off a decent-appearing top coat, it may be best in the long run if any silicone treatment has been used in the past. I have been warned several times that it is incredibly hard to remove finish-ruining traces of silicone without virtually starting over with bare metal.
     

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