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Vintage Ferrari Interior Picture Thread

Discussion in 'Vintage (thru 365 GTC4)' started by Rossocorsa1, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. Rifledriver

    Rifledriver Two Time F1 World Champ

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    #376 Rifledriver, Jan 16, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019

    For many years they used Salchi lacquer paint. It was a terrible product. A year or two after painted it looked pretty bad. But when new they were turning out some great looking cars. How many peoples knowledge of the quality of the paint finish is based on a Salchi panted car a couple of years after it was painted. They went to Glasurit after and a lot of Glasurit cars look as good today as they did in 1985.

    In the later years that stuff was falling off so quick they were buying almost as many paint jobs under warranty as they were rebuilding 308 engines for burning oil.
     
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  2. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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    Agreed. I’m certainly a huge fan of originality. Heaven knows I go to great lengths to maintain and preserve the originality of every material and component on my cars, but, make no mistake, if the paint looked horrible or the leather was all cracked, I would certainly attend to it. As you state above, the vintage cars didn’t have the benefit of great quality paint.

    Anyhow, call me a sucker for a beautifully restored car. If great care was taken with parts, components, materials, and the car is presented as it should, in its original livery, I’m all for enjoying them in concours condition.
     
  3. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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  4. TTR

    TTR Formula 3
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    OK, perhaps I need to expand my comments a bit.
    While I initially was referring to body/paint & interior finish/quality on vintage racing car, I'm also referring to everything* about the vintage cars in general, their restorations and authenticity or lack of it.
    A "complete" restoration of almost any post-war vintage production car, regardless of make/model, will take several thousand (man-)hours to conduct and at highest levels is often afforded attention to details that factory assembly-line mentality couldn't even begin to dream when the cars where manufactured.

    *Quick trivia: Approximately and on average, how many individual** parts and pieces (incl. hardware items like clips, screws, washers, etc) is in a post-war production car ?
    Hint: 6 carburetors combined on a Daytona are made of nearly 1000 pieces (and throwing just a service kit on them doesn't constitute a "restoration"), although many tend to refer a carburetor as a single part. Same with a door, rear axle or speedometer, all which are made of numerous pieces.

    ** "A complete restoration" means that all (or at least most) of those individual bits and pieces are (or should be) separated from each other and some form of refurbishment/replacement is done to/with each and every piece before they're all re-assembled as a complete car. Of course almost every one working (or paying) through that process wants to make sure all or most are as close to "perfect" as possible. Human nature, but doesn't necessarily make the end result appear authentic. Latter is actually much harder than most realize.
     
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  5. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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    We agree. Those are the kinds of restorations I’m referring to.
     
  6. TTR

    TTR Formula 3
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    But do you understand that those Cavallino or PB level “every nut, bolt, clip & screw” restorations are not necessarily anywhere near authentic ?
    And by “authentic” I mean if any given (vintage) car, especially a production model, was placed into a time machine, transported to a date of its “birth” 50+ years ago and placed between several others alike in a new car dealership showroom or lot, it wouldn’t stand out, at all.

    I’ve seen untold number of high level (production car) restorations in past 4 decades, even performed some myself, but only seen very few that could qualify as completely “authentic” and I admit none of mine would.
     
  7. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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    Yes, I understand what you’re saying. While I completely admire those few original cars of the 50’s and 60’s and find them fascinating, if for no other reason than their sheer rarity, I completely understand why owners undertake such extensive restorations. I also understand your point about how the cars originally looked. When I was touring the factory in May, 2017, sitting near the 8 cylinder production like, they had an all original car from the 60’s. I actually forgot what precise model it what. Needless to say, we were deeply underwhelmed with its work quality. It literally looked like they used house paint on it. Another interesting example is the barn find on display at Cavallino last year. Yeah, it was fascinating to look at, but I found it humorous how some were saying things like “I wouldn’t touch it” or “I hope the owner leaves it just the way it is”. I mean, come on. The car was filthy and sad. It was an interesting overly but it needed a total nut and bolt. The beauty and style of these great machines can’t be denied. I think meticulous, and proler restorations are fitting, and a great tribute to them.
     
  8. Bryanp

    Bryanp F1 Rookie
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    All I can provide here is one point of view, resulting in a car that was judged 100 points at PB and Cavallino. Our rubric for the restoration/preservation effort on 0556(0446)MD was to return the car back to how it left the factory in May 1955; the livery is the one it had when it ran as a factory team car at the Venezuela GP in autumn '55. We were in the extremely enviable position of having a very original car to start with (I think only the grille, correct mirror and center taillight were missing), and we knew pretty much everything that had ever happened to it, since we had owned it since May 1960. We also determined that the car was not going to be a static display and was going to be driven (gently - 8/10) on the track. So every single piece of the car that was functional (which on a comp car is pretty much everything), had to be fully sorted and either reconditioned if possible, or replaced (seals, fuel/fluid lines, wiring, the wires on the Borranis . . .). But things like the pitting on the gauge bezels remained.

    That left the aesthetic portions of the car to deal with - body/paint and upholstery. Pierre ("Bira") did a fantastic job on 0564(0424)MD in removing the top layers of paint to reveal the original French Racing Blue. In our case, my father had taken the car to bare metal when he bought it 1960 - it was already on its fifth color when he got it. The metal body was all original, including the right rear quarter which was severely crunched at Nassau '56. The body had a lot of scars, the vast majority of which came from its storage in our garage after dad stopped racing it in 1967. The rear body was pretty badly distorted from the Nassau incident, so we decided that keeping the damage caused by having stored boxes on it, and close encounters w/ lawnmower and bikes on it, lent absolutely nothing to its previous career as a race car - so those scars were removed.

    However, all of the eccentricities and asymmetries in the original Scaglietti body work were left as-is. We replicated the paint system as reasonably as possible; it received a coat of a single-stage paint and was not buffed, wet-sanded nor polished. Showing up at Pebble w/ a modern two-stage/clearcoat system might look nice, but would be an instant deduction for a 1950's race car. A friend of mine who owns a detailing business saw the car after Pebble Beach and said, somewhat horrified, "give me eight hours, and I can get rid of most of that orange peel!" Dad had replaced the upholstery in 1960, so the seats were re-done in the proper vinyl (I think called "plastico" on the build sheets). Somewhere on F-chat are the pics of the thick grape vine that ran around and supported the perimeter of the aluminum buckets underneath the vinyl, and not a steel tube you would expect to find. Those grape vines are still there.

    I can't really comment on the restoration rubric for a street car - I think comp cars have to be viewed differently since they were made as short-term tools. From what I have observed of the work of, and in speaking to the top restorers - Carte/Russell/Smith/Obry/Ottis/etc. - a ton of research on the individual car's history and original build in concert with its current condition is undertaken before the critical decisions re: what stays and what goes are made. As the saying goes, it's only original once. On the other hand, if the car is going to be driven, originality is important but it might not trump utility - it depends on the owner's choices.



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  9. Bryanp

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  10. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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    Bryan - great write-up. Thank you for sharing this info. It’s very enlightening.
     
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  11. Ed Niles

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  12. Ed Niles

    Ed Niles Formula 3
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  13. Ed Niles

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  14. Christian.Fr

    Christian.Fr Two Time F1 World Champ

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  15. Marcel Massini

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    5139 SA was born Grigio Argento.
    Later red and then back to grey.

    Marcel Massini
     
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  16. etienne

    etienne F1 Veteran
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  17. Rossocorsa1

    Rossocorsa1 F1 Rookie

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  18. Marcel Massini

    Marcel Massini F1 World Champ
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  19. Christian.Fr

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  20. turbo-joe

    turbo-joe F1 Veteran
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    you mean picture 4? yes, a very small mirror, like from a motorcycle



    what VIN number?
    the speaker in the center console I never have seen before
     
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