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Weight Lifting techniques and tips

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Skidkid, Nov 19, 2021.

  1. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    That’s a lot of work for forearms and biceps/triceps.
    Are you pushing yourself or simply pumping low weights.
    Arms tend to respond better to higher rep ranges than upper body muscles.
    Try aiming for 8-15 reps and as always focus on the quality of the reps.
    Weight used is of lesser importance.
    But please be very, very careful with the volume of your arm work.
    It’s how I got a nasty case of golfers elbow that haunting me from time to time.
    Although small musclegroups, they are prone to tendonitis very quickly. A threat to older/experienced athletes.
     
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  3. italiafan

    italiafan F1 World Champ
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    Thank you!
     
  4. italiafan

    italiafan F1 World Champ
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    Maybe I need to clarify.
    When doing “bro splits” (which is my usual routine) I’ll do 12-13 sets on chest, then 6 sets on tri’s, and then abs and 2 sets of calves. Again 12-13 sets on back (5 pull down, 4 db row, 4 shrugs), then 6 sets bi’s, 2-3 sets forearm curls. Legs is 12-14 sets combined presses and calves, then abs. On shoulder day I throw in 2 sets bi’s, 2 sets of tri’s just because I love the feeling.

    About every 2-3 months I’ll ditch that for a cycle or two and just do something weird like pick one exercise per day, like slight incline db for chest and do 20 sets, that’s it for the day. Each day is a different exercise.

    Every set I do, always, is 90-100% failure...I stop when I know the next rep just won’t happen.
    For large muscle groups I usually aim for 8-12 reps per set. If I can’t make 8 on the next set I drop the weight. For small muscle groups it is usually 12-15. Forearms 20-25.

    Been doing this with only 2-3 weeks off in total for the last two years and so far (touch wood) joints are holding up.
     
  5. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    I agree 100% on these points. Personally I believe in using protective gear and I gear up very early. If pulling heavy I use either straps or versa-grips; except for deadlift, I just chalk up for that. It really has helped with the tendonitis. I also do not do curls with a straight bar, it really aggravates the tendonitis. I can use a curl bar without pain so hunt around for things that don't over tax that muscle group.

    I use wrist wraps and sleeves (elbow or knee depending on the exercise). The wrist wraps are because the left wrist hurts under heavy load and a little support keeps it from hurting. Also, get a GOOD belt. I have a Pioneer and it is fantastic. Do not get one of those cheap nylon/velcro junk, get a good top grain leather belt; the difference in cost for a great belt vs a cheap one is tiny. I belt up for anything that loads my back and that includes things like overhead press, pendlay rows, squats, deadlift, and even standing curls if they are heavy. For deadlift I belt up starting at 135 (belt early and protect yourself).
     
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  6. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    Sounds great, but again the volume for forearms is worrying.
    Your forearms already get worked with virtually every exercise, overtraining and thus tendonitis is a major concern.
    If you are dead set on working forearms, less than half of your volume would be sufficient.
     
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  8. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
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    I’m a bit more extreme in that I eliminated deadlifts altogether. The cost/benefit ratio was out of control for me. And besides I have no interest in breaking records (anymore). It’s about fun and health now. My days of repping out 500pound deadlifts are behind me.
     
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  9. italiafan

    italiafan F1 World Champ
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    Okay, thanks! I’ll back off them.
     
  10. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    I don't think there is ANY risk of me breaking a record; my deadlift isn't strong. I would be more than happy if I can pull 315 for 1 and my current PR is only 275. For me the benefit is building lower body strength. My legs were underdeveloped compared to the rest of me.
     
  11. Gh21631

    Gh21631 F1 Veteran
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    If you want to hit your quads with dead lifts without straining your back try doing them with the barbell behind you as opposed to front. Do your best to drive from your heels. You don't need a lot of weight just rep it. Start with 135 and go from there. I use this in between squats to also keep my heart rate up.
     
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  13. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
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    I’d like to use a standing deadlift machine that fixes my position or a dumbell deadlift done upright to emphasize quad involvement.
    Doing any regular deadlifts below 400 pounds isn’t floating my boat, so I do other things instead.
     
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  14. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    The downside of being so tall is that leverages start to come into play. Squats and deadlifts can become an issue for you.
    You could focus on the hack squat and it has your back supported, goblet squat, suitcase squat, or if your lucky like my gym has a belt squat or leg press.
    But keep the focus on staying in perfect posture considering your height and possible lower back risk.
     
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  15. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    If I am hitting quads much in a deadlift I am definitely out of form. It is almost all glutes and hamstrings with some inner leg since I use sumo. When I use standard form, my knees are so far over the bar it just doesn't work well. I also try to extend uniformly, if the hips rise too fast it leaves my back very vulnerable. And of course get the upper back tight before launch so you don't slump. For quads I do leg extensions and such.
     
  16. Edward 96GTS

    Edward 96GTS F1 Veteran

    Nov 1, 2003
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    sets =4 or 3 rounds?
     
  17. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
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    Leg extensions score nearly last for leg development…. The other compound movements will do more in 1 set than 10 sets of leg extensions.
    Sumo style would be a better fit for your height indeed.
     
  18. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    Depends on exercise, overall volume and effort. There is no right or wrong here. Generally speaking each exercise would be between 2-4 sets depending on effort.
     
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  19. Gh21631

    Gh21631 F1 Veteran
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    The bar should be behind your feet, try it. First 10 reps are easy then you'll feel the burn in your quads. Steadily go up as you improve but keep your form.
     
  20. Gh21631

    Gh21631 F1 Veteran
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    This exercise as I've described will put a burn on your quads. It's a different feel from traditional squats. Make sure to drop your ass when you come down and push through your heels. If you get to 225 you're doing great. Standing machine deadlifts don't work for me, the range of motion is generally limited on the ones I've used.
     
  21. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    So do tell, what do you think is a better lift to work your quads?

    I hear Gh21631's idea but I fail to see how you can be even remotely balanced doing it. Moving the weight and most of your body mass behind your heals doesn't leave much to offset. Maybe if you lean forward a lot but then you aren't pushing through the heals. But maybe it is just because I haven't tried it.
     
  22. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    As posted in my previous reply:
    “ You could focus on the hack squat and it has your back supported, goblet squat, suitcase squat, or if your lucky like my gym has a belt squat or leg press.
    But keep the focus on staying in perfect posture considering your height and possible lower back risk.“
     
  23. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    Sorry, I had read that. And yes, I do most of those and have that equipment at my gym (most in multiple versions). Leg extensions really end up at the very end when we have a bit more time so they are finishing exercises along with pause rep squats (goblet or body weight). They are always auxiliary and never the main event.
     
  24. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
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    OK, gotcha. Those should be your staple choices. Yes, extensions are a great finisher; never a staple exercise.
     
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  25. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    Made it through the holidays, and while the workouts were a bit sporadic I didn't give up much and I am back at it with a regular schedule. Doing some volume to ramp up, it definitely is making me a bit sore. Then again, I kind of like that feeling. It reminds me that I am doing something. Any specific suggestions on ramping back up?
     
  26. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    The soreness is quite simply your muscles being taxed again. It's pretty normal.
    In a week or so eevrything should be back to normal.
    Getting sore is never a good measuring point to judge if you 'did something meaningfull'.
    Not sure what you mean by ramping things up, but I would simply suggest going back to your regular routine.
    And by regular routine I mean your preferred/previous volume/way of training.
    If chaysing fitness/muscle growth, I would suggest to make small adjustments each and every workout; to keep your nervous system and thus impact a bit fresh and forcing it to adapt. Adaptation is your worst enemy when it come sto muscle growth. It's what you want with sheer strength, but growth is a different pathway.
    Small and easy things you can do are with training a muscle group for example are:
    - changing exercises
    - reps
    - additional techniques like drop sets, static holds, negatives, rest pauze
    - weight used
    - rest between sets
    - rep tempo

    Want to get sore, simply add a finisher set as your last set for a muscle where you can go nuts with volume/pump enhancing techniques like rest pauze or drop sets and a static hold.

    Chest for example you can opt for
    Day 1 - bench press + incline press + dips
    Next workout - incline press + bench press + between benches push ups

    It's always smart; especially when we get older, to keep 'stretch exercises for last in the workout when muscles and joints are warm.
    So never start with flyes, but end with them.
    Same applies for muscle groups, start with back and biceps after in the same workout; not biceps first.

    If you are a non enhanced lifter, stick with 2-3x per muscle group per week. For arms I would suggest an absolute maximum for 2x per week, but that is really stretching yyour recovery as they are being worked on with chest/shoulders and back.
    Protein Synthesis remains high for 48 hours and quickly declines aftr that period.
    So scientifically it's better to train muscle groups more frequent with less volume per workout than to obliterate them once a week.

    Nutrition wise, opt for 2gram of protein per pound of lean muscle. Got a fast metabolism increase carbs, got a slow one decrease carbs.
    Carbs are fuel they are not mandatory for our bodies to survive. Protein is. Water is.

    Good luck!
     
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  27. Skidkid

    Skidkid F1 Veteran
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    Super helpful, thank you. I do most of what you wrote already but probably not enough by design. Pretty much the only way to get sore is volume on the finishers; be that drop sets, pauses, etc. and just keep hitting them. By ramping up, I really meant I wasn't going in for a new PR but go for the 80% mark with some volume to get everything moving smoothly again. If I am going to hit 2grams protein/lb lean muscle, I am really going to have to up my eating game and eat a lot more. And yes, I am a non enhanced lifter. I generally lift 4 days per week with weekends off and one day mid-week.
     
  28. Maximus1973

    Maximus1973 Formula Junior

    Oct 29, 2016
    562
    Pleasure to help.

    Well there you have it; a very important part of the puzzle solved.
    Get your eating game in check. Not only will it increase your physique, your health will benefit greatly as well.
    As we age, our protein retention drops, causing us to loose muscle mass. It's one of the key drivers of 'aging'. Increase protein intake through various sources and live longer and healthier.
    A nice hack virtually all Northern European lifters use is a tub of quark/skyr/non fat greek yoghurt. A 1lbs tub generally has 40-50gr of casein protein. Ideal to eat as last thing before bed. Sweeten it with a non calorie sweetner or add some berries and over 25% of your daily protein intake has been covered!
    If you generally ask professional athletes what the biggest challenge is/was 99% will say the diet/eating; not the training.

    There are no general rules for how weekly sets for body parts. Best ay to determine is how you feel and if you are recovered. For larger muscles like back and quads you can get away with 20 sets per week. Yet with biceps and triceps it would be half at best.

    But again, getting 'sore' is never a good judgement of making 'gains'! You just taxed your muscles in a new way; that's typically all.
    If you feel pefectly fresh the 1-2 days after a workout you could probably do a bit more. feeling sore days after a workout than don't work that muscle group again. Very simple.
    It's tough to give guidelines as everyone is different and the amount of variables is immense. So always go by how you feel. Your body will never trick you.
    You should look forward to working out each and every muscle group. If it becomes a chore you need to dial it back a bit.

    Not getting very sore also means you can hit that muscle group more frequent causing even greater results. When you become/ are advanced you should know where your sweet spot is and try to hover at the point between pefectly recovered and over training. There is a fine balance in between and that's where even more magic can happen.
    If you have an able PT (99% are crap) he should be able to ddraft you a periodisation training schedule where you ramp up volume over time and back off as well. Intensity should be cycled in waves. Slowly increasing and at peak level back off a bit to allow for over compensation.

    Cheers!
     
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