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What will we do with them all ?

Discussion in 'Vintage (thru 365 GTC4)' started by R33, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. R33

    R33 Formula Junior

    May 7, 2005
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    Paul Creed
    I was at work today, daydreaming again of owning a Vintage ferrari, and the thought occurred to me, what will we do with all of the rare vintage cars in say 100+ years time.
    There have been a lot of posts lately about the authenticity of cars, and other posts showing F-cars beautifully restored to their original steel condition etc etc.
    There will come a time, when these precious cars will need further restoration, and considering the opinion of some about replicas, i wondered if contingency plans should be made to start making replica models of these cars in better materials, so that in 200+ years, the legends still live on in all their glory.

    So!!....Do we just keep restoring them as best we can with original material(bearing in mind that those materials may not always be available)?
    OR
    Do we make replicas of them and just make the most of the originals now, and do what we can to make them last?

    Would be interested to know peoples thoughts, albeit we wont be around to see the outcome:(
     
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  3. Jay_GTB

    Jay_GTB Karting
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    Oct 5, 2005
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    Once we have overcome the global revolution resulted from the crisis of falling profits, concurrent with the exploitation of the workers (i.e., our great grandchildren), we will likely come to a harmonious socialist state where Ferraris will be irrelevant, but can be experienced by everyone on virtual platforms… kinda like walking through a wax museum with the headphones.

    jay
     
  4. dretceterini

    dretceterini F1 Veteran

    Apr 28, 2004
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    will take over again, and prices will reach $10,000,000 for a Daytona in the year 3000
     
  5. Kram

    Kram Formula Junior

    Jul 3, 2004
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    Good question, but one based on the assumption that in 100 years a large (and affluent) number of people will be interested in and be able to discriminate between Ferrari cars and everything else with four black tires touching the ground.

    I respectively suggest that won’t be the case. Ferraris will be like Britzen or Faberge artifacts; occasionally mentioned, sometime seen, and almost never contextually appreciated.
     
  6. dretceterini

    dretceterini F1 Veteran

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    look at what Tiffany lamps, Stickley furniture and other art deco and art nouveau objects are now worth. A $10 Stickley corner table cound now be worth $40,000!
     
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  8. Kram

    Kram Formula Junior

    Jul 3, 2004
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    Yes, but you can always use a table and still use a lamp. A version of Edison's 1878 light bulb is can be bought at the corner store. Will a 100 year old Ferrari be as handy? I doubt it.....
     
  9. trkevin

    trkevin Formula Junior

    Nov 3, 2003
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    K. Blommaert
    This is a question where I have been thinking many times about.

    So what if there is no petrol anymore? That would mean we can't drive them anylonger. Or maybe we have to convert Ferrari's to drive on water or on something else. Or will every Ferrari become a garage queen? Or just rust away in a field because nobody is interested anymore.

    I personnally don't have a clue.
     
  10. R33

    R33 Formula Junior

    May 7, 2005
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    Paul Creed
    Maybe there will not be any petrol!!, maybe the need to have such desired possessions will no longer be there, but i have no doubt whatsoever, that Ferraris and similar exotica will always be fondly remembered. You just cannot ignore history in such a short space of time. It would take 100's of years for it to get to that stage.
    I agree that the majority probably will not care, but there will be people that want to know, and see for themselves. These cars in the flesh are just pure pleasure. How will we immortalise that?
    Like i said, at the moment, they are there for us to see (well, except for those who wish not to be known with their hidden treasures). We currently discuss the originality of a car, or original materials used, but to what end.? When does something original and regarded become non existant and replicated?
    I know it all sounds very depressive, but we are a long time dead, and personally i want life to be as rich with opportunities as possible. I want to see rare and famous cars, and meet drivers and people that i hold high regard for, but when i die, who will carry on that train of thought....thats the bit that worries me.
     
  11. Tspringer

    Tspringer F1 Veteran

    Apr 11, 2002
    6,155
    Though it will require modifications to a different type of fuel storage system and pumping system.... the internal combustion engine as fitted to every Ferrari ever built will burn hydrogen quite well with only minor engine modifications. Same goes for methanol or other hybrid fuels.


    Keep in mind, the gasoline you buy today is VERY different from what was sold back in the 1960s, in more ways than just octane rating and lead content.

    I seriously doubt our vintage machines will be burning the same fuel 100 years from now that we burn today, but I am very sure they will still be burning SOME type of fuel and being enjoyed.



    Terry
     
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  13. R33

    R33 Formula Junior

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    Fuel wasnt really my issue, but yes i have to agree that they will indeed still run on recycled fuel in 100's years.
    My main point was that somewhere along the line, what is highly regarded today as an original vintage F-car in every way, will surely diminish, unless stored somehow to prevent that, but then that sort of defies the point of having such a car... so will people make replicas to keep the legend going?...then ..how highly regarded will those replicas be?
     
  14. dretceterini

    dretceterini F1 Veteran

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    of the pre-war 6c 1750 that looks more like a "slammed" MG or TF to me, but they have gotten fairly valauable, as only 90-something of them were made.
     
  15. SefacHotRodder

    SefacHotRodder F1 World Champ

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    #12 SefacHotRodder, Oct 19, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Unfortunatley, we probably won't have many cars in 100 years time :( We'll be jetting everywhere with our own star wars type aircraft :D
    Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
  16. jaturon

    jaturon Formula 3

    Oct 25, 2004
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    Come on guys, we are talking 200+, 300+ years from now!
    Who knows what's going to happen then?
    They might be able to 'clone' the vintage car very easily with the future whatever technology.
    I wouldn't worry about the replicas but more worried about the states of the originals!
     
  17. Ashman

    Ashman Two Time F1 World Champ
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    The nice thing about making forecasts for 100, 200 or more years in the future is that no one alive today will be able to prove you wrong!

    Just as people today preserve Colonial lifestyles in places like Williamsburg, there will places for Ferraris. Even if it remains possible to start up the engines, using some sort of fuel, whether it will be even possible to navigate them on whatever byways people will be using in 200 years is anybody's guess.

    John
     
  18. naparsei

    naparsei Formula Junior
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    I try to drive at least one of my vintage stagecoaches every day, just to keep them in use. They were made to be driven. Everywhere I go, people give me a thumb's up, especially on the freeway.
     
  19. jaturon

    jaturon Formula 3

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    In 200+ years the sound of engine turning over might be a rare treat!
     
  20. R33

    R33 Formula Junior

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    Would be nice to see exactly what vintage cars you have then!! come on then, show us :)

    Good points from all above.
    I'm sure technology will prevail when it comes to preserving the legends, even if the roads and lifestyles have changed so dramatically that there is no longer a possibility of driving them....but then i suppose that makes them less desirable.
     
  21. jjmcd

    jjmcd Formula Junior

    Dec 3, 2004
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    The more interesting question is not what happens to the vintage Ferrari market in 100+ years, but what happens to that market in 50 years, when 50's - 60's Ferrari's are considered "antiques" and the prime collector market of that time period (40-50 year old men) want the Ferraris from their youth --i.e., 360s, 550s and Enzos.

    The transition will occur - already, the collector market for pre-war classic cars has cooled considerably as those who remember those cars from their youths have died off and no one has replaced them. Duesenbergs that sold for $1M+ ten years ago are now selling for $500-600k and brass-era cars are a tough sell at almost any price.
     
  22. synchro

    synchro F1 Veteran

    Feb 14, 2005
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    This is a thought that went through my mind...in the 1970's

    Where are we today? Not that far away from the 1970's!
     
  23. donv

    donv Two Time F1 World Champ
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    You know, I've heard this repeated often, but is it really true? I was looking through a recent issue of Sports Car Market, and there were several brass-era cars which sold for 6 figure prices, and the only Duesenberg I saw was sold at $1M +.

    Bugattis also seem to be pretty pricey.

     
  24. lukek

    lukek Formula 3

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  25. jsa330

    jsa330 F1 Veteran
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    I remember all that well...my uncle, born around 1918, had 20's and 30's cars like Pierce-Arrow, Lincoln, Rolls-Royce, in the 50's, 60's, and 70's. My parents knew a guy of the same generation who had a garage full of the pre-1920 brass-era cars, perfectly restored. I thought all those cars were very cool but the deeply burning lusts of my 1960's teenage heart were the current Corvettes and Ferraris...and that's the way it played out for me in later years.
     
  26. dretceterini

    dretceterini F1 Veteran

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    I think the rare marques and especially the rare models (Ferrari TR, Ferrari GTO, Bugatti Royale, Bugatti Atlantic, Alfa 8c2900, etc) will always be worth a lot of money, an will always continue to go up in value. The older, but more common cars will decrease in value over time (not counting for inflation).
     
  27. Dave

    Dave F1 Rookie

    Apr 15, 2001
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    What does it matter?
    I will be dead in 100+ years!
     
  28. teterman2004

    teterman2004 Karting

    Jan 15, 2005
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    Ever watch "antiques roadshow"? Furniture pieces from the 17th and 18th centuries are commonly valued at $30-80k++. Remember, that's for a piece of FURNITURE. . .(!)

    Imagine what a living, fire-breathing piece of steel and alluminum from the "golden-era" of vintage sports racing will go for in 200-300 years, and I'm not talking just the race cars.

    In the next 50-75 years, ALL vintage 12-cyl ferraris will cease to become merely "classic cars" and will become historic relics that are carefully treasured by the best collectors of automotive history. Just look at how pre-war bentley blowers, hispano-suizas, dusies, bugattis, open-topped mercs, etc are being treated today.

    The longer the auto is around, the closer to the "roots of automotive history" the 1960s-70s will become. Remember, common automotive features like SEATBELTS and SAFETY BUMPERS weren't required until the late 1970s. . .(!)
     

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