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Why did Ferrari in the 60s make most of the cars out of steel?

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Arvin Grajau, May 1, 2009.

  1. Arvin Grajau

    Arvin Grajau Five Time F1 World Champ

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    Alloy would have been cheaper and easier to form/shape. and lighter.
     
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  3. SPEEDCORE

    SPEEDCORE Four Time F1 World Champ

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    Steel is an alloy :p
     
  4. Arvin Grajau

    Arvin Grajau Five Time F1 World Champ

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    sorry alaminuim
     
  5. RMV

    RMV F1 Veteran

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    I think it was so they could have something up their sleeves re. the comp models. JM thought this could be a possibility as well.
     
  6. Arvin Grajau

    Arvin Grajau Five Time F1 World Champ

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    you would think that getting the cars light would have been a factor in building them.
    as JM said,its lighter,cheaper and easier to shape.
     
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  8. wax

    wax Four Time F1 World Champ
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    From a practical standpoint... Availability, raw material cost, tensile stength, speed of overall construction, repairable. In short, cost-savings all around, as I don't know that customers worldwide would have shops with alloy repairs at the ready.
     
  9. DriveAfterDark

    DriveAfterDark F1 Veteran

    Jan 1, 2007
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    I don't think it was technologically possible at that time. Wasn't the first "aluminum" production car launched in in 1990/1991?

    The repairing of a "aluminum" damaged car requires special skills as well (without having the knowledge to explain excactly why) and is therefore much more expensive... So I guess we can translate "harder to repair" into "harder to make".
    Right?


    But most of those 60's steel machines are still lighter than todays ultramodern "aluminum" constructions anyway... LOL...
     
  10. Arvin Grajau

    Arvin Grajau Five Time F1 World Champ

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    Aston Martins are all alloy in the db2,4,5,6s.
    coach built Rolls Royce cars were alloy.
     
  11. DriveAfterDark

    DriveAfterDark F1 Veteran

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    Wow, I didn't know that! Thought only door panels and such were alu-made in the year before 1990... Do'h!!
     
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  13. simon klein

    simon klein F1 World Champ
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    Bristols,I think you,ll find were all alloy from late 40s,they made aircraft hence the ease of access to the product and expertese in making them.
     
  14. Arvin Grajau

    Arvin Grajau Five Time F1 World Champ

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    standard RR/Bs was only doors,boot, bonnet
     
  15. Paul308GTSi

    Paul308GTSi Formula Junior

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    Paul D
    Fibro was not really an option !
     
  16. Paul308GTSi

    Paul308GTSi Formula Junior

    Oct 26, 2008
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    Being serious for a while ......... aluminium is a big of a bugger of a material to repair. If you bend aluminium with a nice sharp kink in it and then straighten it the material will be much weaker than would happen with the same bend and straightening in steel.

    If you get a piece of aluminium and bend it over and over ( just a thin bit and bend it by hand ) it will eventually snap in two.

    I'm sure my panel guy ( experienced Ferrari panel & aircraft skin repairer) said if the chassis of a bent car is aluminium it has to be cut and a new piece welded in , , no straightening allowed.

    Lots of things back in the 30's - 60's were riveted together , just as aeroplanes (the ones still using aluminium) are still riveted together today. My dad is involved in a Beaufort bomber restoration group and I just talked to the qualified airframe guy , , you can't even have a slight scratch in aircraft skin (even WWII restorations) because after a few years that tiny little scratch will split , , most likely up in the air of course. See pic of rebuilt outboard wing section attached
    There is a lot to working and bending aluminium intentionally too , , you have to start with annealed aluminium ( soft and bendy state ) , bend it how you want .... then heat treat it which means heating it all up under controlled temperatures and times to five hundered and something degrees and then quite literally dump it into a huge tank of water. At this point it's now no longer annealed and bending is not allowed. If you thought painting cars took care you should see how many steps there are to painting a bit of aircraft skin ... OMG !

    I'm sure there will be variations on all car aluminium repairs dependant upon who is fixing what and how broken it is........................

    Aluminium cars burn well too , there was a shot of a burnt out crashed Jag on the news here a few nights ago , , if they didn't tell the viewers it was a Jag we wouldn't have known because the remains were lucky to be 6 inches in height. Totaled
     
  17. Paul308GTSi

    Paul308GTSi Formula Junior

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    #14 Paul308GTSi, May 2, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017

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