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Bora ignition switch

Discussion in 'Maserati' started by jojoh12, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. jojoh12

    jojoh12 Rookie

    Aug 16, 2014
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    Germany
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    Johannes H
    Planning to enjoy the last summer days with an extensive tour in the Bora today, I had an issue with starting the car: everything worked well except the starter. I checked the starter itself as well as the cable to the ignition Switch... it seems that the ignition Switch does not work properly.
    Did anyone had the same issue yet and knows if there are any part interchanges with Bosch parts for example? Any other idea where to source a replacement is also welcome?


    Best regards,
    Johannes
     
  2. staatsof

    staatsof Six Time F1 World Champ
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  3. thecarnut

    thecarnut Formula 3

    Apr 22, 2006
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    Not a rare problem as the switch's internal contacts burn.

    The original manufacturer was Sipea and they were also used on many other Italian cars, including Lancias and Fiats. This is not a rare or Maserati-unique switch.

    Ivan
     
  4. staatsof

    staatsof Six Time F1 World Champ
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    Do you have any other identification information for this?
     
  5. jojoh12

    jojoh12 Rookie

    Aug 16, 2014
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    Johannes H
    I was not able to dismantle mine so far but i think it is identical to the one of Fiat 850 Spider for example. Do not know if the Pins on the back side are identical? The MIE pics do not Show These unfortunately...
     
  6. staatsof

    staatsof Six Time F1 World Champ
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    If you are a MCI/MIE member (well worth it in my view for any Maserati owner) then you can email & phone them for more information.

    But just taking a few google links it appears MIE's prices on this part are very competitive so why F around?
     
  7. thecarnut

    thecarnut Formula 3

    Apr 22, 2006
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    #7 thecarnut, Oct 21, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2017
    Johannes,

    Were you able to remove the switch using the instructions I e-mailed you?

    For the benefit of others, this is what I said (note: this is a USA steering wheel) and the wheel itself had already been removed (see photo).

    You need to remove the center nut and the hub will come out if you tap it with a hammer. Then take out the wheel locking bracket which is held by a couple allen screws. Put the key in the ignition and look for a hole which will be located at about 4 o’clock. I use an allen wrench in that hole to push what holds the lock in place ... remember that the key must be inserted and maybe in the on position (can’t remember).

    Ivan
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  8. staatsof

    staatsof Six Time F1 World Champ
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    Good stuff!
     
  9. jojoh12

    jojoh12 Rookie

    Aug 16, 2014
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    Johannes H
    Yep, everything is in order again. Just started to Change the A-arm bushings in the rear and looking Forward to be back on the road again next Weekend.
     
  10. 71Satisfaction

    71Satisfaction Formula Junior
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    Buona sera, tutti..

    My Bora's ignition switch recently became unreliable so I decided to replace before it leaves me stranded somewhere other than in my own garage. Here are a few photos and notes to add to this thread. I'm reasonably sure the Khamsin and Indy have the same ignition switch..

    I sourced a replacement from MIE right around $200, which was a nice contrast to similar vintage Ferrari switches offered online in the $2,200 range.
    The replacement is a license-made NEIMAN switch, with some differences in the layout and switch circuitry of the pins on the back. I spoke w Jacques and he sourced their switches from Maserati directly. There are a couple mods to make, but they do fit and work as intended. If you receive a switch without a schematic of its internals, just call MIE for a PDF.

    DISASSEMBLY:
    You start by orienting the steering wheel and front tires straight ahead and disconnecting the battery.
    1.) Remove the steering wheel horn pad by pulling free the tension spring on the back. Disconnect horn wire.
    2.) Unbolt steering wheel (4x 10mm), then unbolt the collapsible steel extension (4x 8mm).
    3.) You can now pull the rubber closure garnish off the end of the steering column armature, exposing the ignition switch area, q.v. photo in post #7 above.

    This exposes the main steering wheel hub (aluminum) with the splined center steering shaft (steel).
    4.) Unlock any tabs holding the center castle nut from rotating. Loosen the castle nut and unscrew it from the steering shaft. Remove the locking washer underneath the castle nut.

    5.) At this point you want to "Index" the position of the splined aluminum hub to the steel center shaft, there is no "key spline" that guides the hub and shaft to the position that orients the steering wheel true with the front wheels (I used a center punch to punch two dots on the rim of the steel shaft, then two associated dots on the aluminum hub at the 4 and 9 o'clock positions).

    6.) Use a 4mm allen wrench at the 10 o'clock position to unscrew the "armor block" protecting the shoulder of the steering lock tongue. See photo 3.
    7.) Use a 3/16" allen wrench to unscrew the ignition switch cylinder's set screw located behind the now-removed "armor block".
    8.) Insert the ignition key and turn to first detent position to retract the steering lock tongue. The key at the first position is important because it also allows the locking plate to be depressed in step 10.).
    9.) Find the small hole in the steering column armature at the 4 o'clock position and insert a 7/64" allen wrench as a push pin.
    10.) Use the key to pull on the ignition switch out of its bore while pushing the pin into the hole. The pin depresses a sprung locking plate and allows the ignition switch to slide out of its cylinder.
    11.) You should feel the cylinder come loose slide out of it's hole.

    12.) The wiring bundle behind the ignition switch may need some help coming forward enough to pull out, so use your hand to help it where it enters the steering column from behind the dash.
    13.) Make note of each wire's connector position at the back of the ignition switch. See photo 4.

    14.) Disconnect all the wire connectors from the ignition switch. Check for signs of overheating, clean them up.
    15.) Make a 4in/10cm jumper wire with a proper 'female' spade connector at each end. I do not recall the wire size. See photo 5.
    16.) Connect the 'female' spade connectors to their terminals on the new NEIMAN ignition switch. See attached photo 5.
    17.) Connect the battery and bring the ignition switch and wire bundle to the car and plug the 4-connector plug into the end that you left under the dash.
    18.) Try the ignition switch to be sure everything works as intended.

    19.) The new NEIMAN ignition switch has different positions than the original:
    a.) The key can only be removed at position III. You want nothing energized in this position, but the switch can be wired wrong and allow this to happen.
    b.) The steering is unlocked at position 0. Nothing is energized at this position.
    c.) The car's electric power is energized at position I.
    d.) The starter is engaged at position II.

    20.) If you are satisfied with the car's systems getting energized in the sequences you expect of the key positions, then reassemble everything in reverse.

    Photo 1:
    The back of the new NEIMAN ignition switch with no wires attached.
    A.) The bottom two brass terminals at 5 and 7 o'clock are the live 12V positive power feed. One gets the 12V battery feed PINK wire. The other gets one end of the short jumper.
    B.) The 4 o'clock brass terminal is energized at positions III, II and I, but not 0. I connected the GREEN/BLACK wire here.
    C.) The two copper terminals at 1 and 2 o'clock form a closed circuit in position I (Run). The jumper goes to one of the terminals here to provide power. The BLUE / BLACK wire goes to the other copper terminal.
    D.) The brass terminal at 9 o'clock is position II (Start) and gets the WHITE wire.

    Photo 2:
    Step 7.) using a 3/16" allen wrench to remove the ignition switch set screw behind the steering lock tongue.

    Photo 3:
    Steps 9.) 10.) 11.) Pulling the ignition switch out after the locking plate has been depressed by the 7/64" allen wrench. Keys removed for clarity.

    Photo 4:
    Step 12.) Pulling the original ignition switch forward out of its bore in the steering column armature, and looking at the back of the ignition switch. NOTE: For you with eagle eyes, the two thin pink and white wires are for the Seat Belt Warning light. I have already abandoned this feature by disconnecting it behind the dash. Therefore I have made no provision for them in wiring the new NEIMAN ignition switch.

    Photos 5:
    Step 16.) View of the new wire locations, and the red jumper wire from (PINK) battery power terminal to one of the two copper Position I (Run) terminals.

    Cheers,
    - Art






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  11. JulianMerak

    JulianMerak Formula 3

    I thought I replaced my BORA dash Merak switch with one of these, this was over 7 years ago but I recall it being a very easy substitution

    Julian
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