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Brake bleeder recommendations ?

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by finnerty, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. finnerty

    finnerty F1 World Champ
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    May 18, 2004
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    David
    I'm looking for a good "power" brake bleeding setup (pressure / vacuum) --- would like one that can be used both to flush and fill the entire system.

    Only real requirements are ---

    One-man operation
    Cost < $100
    Universal (but mostly European / Japanese) car applications

    Any suggestions, please ?

    Thanks
     
  2. flash32

    flash32 Formula 3

    Aug 22, 2008
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    Motive power bleeder for brakes

    To get every drop you will need a good diag tool that engages the anti lock brake system

    Alternatively ..bleed brakes with bleeder and then go on a sandy parking lot and big brakes so antilock kicks in ..the same amount of fluid will then be mixed with the rest but newer fluid will be in antilock unit

    Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk
     
  3. Redneck Slim

    Redneck Slim Formula Junior
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    Mar 10, 2011
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    If you won't be using a scan tool to activate the abs system, look into Stahlbus one-man bleeders. They make the job easy.
     
  4. vincep99

    vincep99 Formula 3
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    Jun 8, 2009
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    What flash32 said: I use the Motive Power and it works great
     
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  5. jcurry

    jcurry F1 Veteran
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    I use the Motive on Italian, German, US, and Japanese. It works on all of them, provided you have the correct adapter for the car. So yes it is universal, but I have 4 different adapters.;)
     
  6. Nino1964

    Nino1964 Karting

    Aug 14, 2015
    140
    North Georgia
    I have motive but my wife is pumping is just as easy.
     
  7. moysiuan

    moysiuan Formula 3
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    Nov 1, 2005
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    Motive is a good product with adapters for most cars. Keep in mind power bleeders build up about 15psi pressure, some old cars can have the plastic master cylinder crack from the pressure, and over time the Motive clear vinyl hose can burst. So replace the hose every few years, and if your master cylinder is irreplaceable, go with a vacuum bleeder instead. Don't forget that for difficult to bleed systems, a viable approach is a simple gravity drip bleed, no pumping of the brake pedal, just open up the bleeder and let it drain slowly to a container, tighten the bleeder back up and you are done. Takes a couple of hours per caliper to bleed like this, and who wants to take that long, but it actually can get air out where other faster methods don't.
     
  8. Solid State

    Solid State F1 Rookie
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    Feb 4, 2014
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    The process of purposely pumping air into the brake system just bothers me. Its supposed to be a reservoir with an internal hydraulic pump eliminating air from entering the system. Would much rather draw fluid from each caliper while refilling then introduce air under pressure then try to get it back out.

    I use a single person vacuum bleeder from Griotts that my wife bought me about ten years ago. It uses your air compressor to pull a vacuum. You have to empty the container of old fluid and make sure you don't suck the reservoir dry as you add fluid. Best to vacuum most of the old fluid out of the reservoir before you start. The Ferrari is still under maintenance so let them do that car.
     
  9. jcurry

    jcurry F1 Veteran
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    If you vacuum out the old fluid before you start you have introduced A LOT of air into the system. Seems counter-productive. Otherwise there is no difference between vacuum or pressure, both require to ensure there is sufficient fluid in the reservoir when pulling/pushing new fluid into the lines.
     
  10. JimEakin

    JimEakin Formula Junior
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    Jun 13, 2015
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    Just use a turkey baster or flavor injector to suck out most of the old fluid (putting it in an old drinking water bottle), then top up with new. I use a manual vacuum bleeder to bleed the brakes, bought it at Pep Boys.

    This can be done for old power steering fluid, too, to flush (most of) the power steering fluid without disconnecting pipes on the steering rack.
     
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  11. jcurry

    jcurry F1 Veteran
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    I mis-read the post, i.e. remove old from reservoir. Yes, I do that before using the Motiv (pressure) bleeder. The point remains there is no difference in procedure between pressure or vacuum bleeders when used properly.
     
  12. flash32

    flash32 Formula 3

    Aug 22, 2008
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    Can explain more on power steering .. are you just sucking the reservoir

    Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk
     
  13. JimEakin

    JimEakin Formula Junior
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    This is something I had to do periodically on my 'Vette:
    Suck out the old fluid from the reservoir.
    Fill with new fluid. (Make sure to use the correct type. My 550 calls for automatic transmission fluid.)
    Start engine.
    Turn steering fully left and right several times. This cycles the fluid through the steering rack.
    Turn off engine.
    Repeat.

    You won't be able to flush out all of the old fluid, but it does flush most of it. The fluid being taken out gets clearer after a few cycles.
     
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  14. flash32

    flash32 Formula 3

    Aug 22, 2008
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    Thanks

    Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk
     
  15. Solid State

    Solid State F1 Rookie
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    Sure looks like your pumping air into the reservoir from the videos. Don't see how some of that doesn't get into the system. Air will have atmospheric moisture in it as well. Maybe I'm missing something here.
     
  16. jcurry

    jcurry F1 Veteran
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    Because just like if you use a vacuum bleeder it is required to keep sufficient fluid in the reservoir to prevent air from being drawn into the system. The Motive pressure bleeder can be used with or without fluid in the tank. With fluid there is no danger of the reservoir being too low. Just more cleanup after (of the tank).
     
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  17. Ak Jim

    Ak Jim F1 Rookie
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    Dec 23, 2007
    4,382
    North Pole AK
    Any one just gravity bleed brakes? I replaced front calipers and brake hoses and just let the system gravity bleed. If your not in a hurry it seems to work well. I will add, this was on an older car with out antilock brakes so I'm not sure it would work on newer cars.
     

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