News

Carlo, how's your schedule?

Discussion in 'Northwest' started by dickvandorm, Jun 18, 2005.

  1. dickvandorm

    dickvandorm Rookie

    May 24, 2005
    36
    Olympia, WA. USA
    Full Name:
    Dick Pierson
    Opps ! I think I hurt my car. Last night while pulling it into the garage bay I released the clutch at idle RPM, the car "jumped a tiny bit" and made a pop like a .22 going off. Now the car will not move, I can put it in gear, release the clutch completely with the motor running and can feel (just slightly) the gears turning in the trans. but the car will not move. Had to push it in by hand but it was very tight, almost completely locked up, took all two men had to get in the bay. The brake is off, the trans is in neutral, when we finally got it to move there was a "tight" sound, like a brake was on. Nothing is leaking from any case, brakes are completely released. Any thoughts ?
     
  2. To remove this ad click here.

  3. Jdubbya

    Jdubbya Two Time F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 28, 2003
    24,057
    PNW
    Full Name:
    John
    Dick,

    Sorry to hear about your troubles. Are you able to get it in gear while it's running or was that with the car off? Will the car start again after shutting it off?

    Could be something as simple (relatively speaking of course) as a clutch cable or the clutch could simply be stuck. Does the pedal feel any different now from before? Does the shifter feel any different?

    I hope it's something simple and your able to get it fixed quickly!!

    John
     
  4. dickvandorm

    dickvandorm Rookie

    May 24, 2005
    36
    Olympia, WA. USA
    Full Name:
    Dick Pierson
    Found the problem !

    The right real axle snapped that the hub. Thank goodness it happened in my driveway and not at 100 MPH. I have been running the car on about 25% of the axle attached all this time. The break was very rusty and therefore showed signs of being an old break, I think i just finished it off in the driveway. Now I just have to figure out how to get the remaining piece of axel out of the housing. Scarry !

    Thanks for the feedback.

    Dick
     
  5. Jdubbya

    Jdubbya Two Time F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 28, 2003
    24,057
    PNW
    Full Name:
    John
    While that not good news obviously, it's not as bad as it could have been. Much better an axle than the gearbox. Still sorry to hear about your troubles but like you said, it's good it happened when it did! Should be a pretty straightforward fix too! I know others will suggest this but while you've got it apart I'd get the other shafts checked too!
     
  6. dickvandorm

    dickvandorm Rookie

    May 24, 2005
    36
    Olympia, WA. USA
    Full Name:
    Dick Pierson
    Right on, that is a good call. I will do that, I don't want to take a chance on anything happening while I am at speed. I am out to the shop right now to get started, hopefully I can get this done today and be back on the road next week.
     
  7. To remove this ad click here.

  8. Spasso

    Spasso F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Feb 16, 2003
    14,612
    Land of Slugs & Moss
    Full Name:
    Han Solo
    I'm with Jdubbya on this. Be glad you didn't spin the trans into two gears at the same time, snap an input shaft or have a timing belt jump a tooth from the shock.

    I am wondering how and why that axle would be cracked. I have never heard of that happening on a 3X8 unless it was being hot rodded.

    To help you along in your first endevour with your "Mongo" you must memorize the following 10 rules of ownership.

    Rule #1. Do not expect to get anything done quickly on a Ferrari. It will probably take 3 times longer than you orginally thought.

    Rule #2 Keep a small child handy to reach into the tiny little crevises that only the Italians could think up.

    Rule #3 Talk to your doctor about a third hand.

    Rule #4 Prepare to spend 3 times what you thought it would cost.

    Rule #5 Never set a deadline for completion

    Rule #5 Take pictures of everything with a digital camera BEFORE you take it apart.

    Rule #6 Keep www.wordreference.com handy on your computer so you can translate those part names listed in Italian.

    Rule #7 Be sure to give the car a name. You can love it more if it has a name. You will also have something to call it when you cuss at it! See www.wordreference.com if you want to cuss in Italian.

    Rule #8 CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN. Keep it clean. A clean engine is much nicer to work on than a dirty one.

    Rule #9 Treat your car good and it will treat you good. Do ALL of the required maintenance when it is due.

    Rule #10 Remember, It's just a loose formation of nuts and bolts much like any other car except this one was assembled by passionate Italians. There is no other like it. All you need is a few tools, the specifications and a lot of patience. (and maybe a little wine and cheese).

    I am sorry that we live so far apart. My lift just happens to be empty this week.
    Good luck,
    DJ
     
  9. BillyD

    BillyD Formula 3
    Silver Subscribed

    Feb 28, 2004
    1,671
    Pacific Northwest
    Full Name:
    Bill
    It seems to me that the car should have moved with one axle disconnected since its suppose to have a posi/limited slip differential. Where am I wrong here?
    Bill
     
  10. dickvandorm

    dickvandorm Rookie

    May 24, 2005
    36
    Olympia, WA. USA
    Full Name:
    Dick Pierson
     
  11. f355spider

    f355spider F1 World Champ
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    May 29, 2001
    17,176
    USA
    Full Name:
    Hugh G. Rection
    Here's another 10 rules from Dr. Ken Rentiers, of Ferrarilist fame....

    > I know there are a lot of lurkers on the board who dream of someday
    > getting a Ferrari. If so read these rules, I have been through the
    > experience of Ferrari ownership. Will I get another - yes, but with my
    > eyes wide open. My hope is these Tin Commandments serve to give you
    > some of the same insight I now possess.
    >
    > The Tin Commandments
    >
    > 1. Ferraris are toy cars.
    > - Street going Ferraris are intended as playthings for rich gentlemen
    > with many cars, and someone else to polish them. They are the worst
    > possible choice as a sole means of transportation. There are people on
    > this list who use Ferraris as daily drivers. These folks are also
    > capable of changing their crankshaft bearings after dinner.
    >
    > 2. Most buyers pay way too much for Ferraris.
    > - New Ferraris sell for a quarter million because there are 1,000
    > people a year in the USA who will pay that much. If you are not
    > employed by the NBA, a trust baby and/or don't know what 'bling-bling'
    > is, your choice will be restricted to used Ferraris. The prices quoted
    > in Ferrari Market Letter are accurate ASKING prices. Most cars sell for 15
    or 20 percent
    > less and down. There are lots of cars available, right now it's a
    > buyer's market. If you can't keep the lust under control have someone
    > else buy the car for you.
    >
    > 3. There is no such thing as a Ferrari where everything works.
    > - On big airliners where all systems have redundancy the pilot keeps a
    > clipboard of Things To Fix. Often there are a dozen or more items. Get
    > a small clipboard for you Ferrari. You will need it.
    >
    > 4. Old Ferraris are old, unreliable cars.
    > - IF properly serviced the drive-train is stone, cold dependable. Not
    > the air con, not the seats or the top or anything electrical or hydraulic
    > except the brakes. Windows, doors, handles, lights will give you grey
    > hair. Remember 308s are now 20 - 30 year old cars that weren't reliable
    > when they were new.
    >
    > 5. New Ferraris are new, unreliable cars.
    > - Why? Because so few are made, they never get all the bugs worked out.
    > With a list like this, and a year or two, and $5,000 - $10,000 you can
    > pretty well debug a good car. Double that figure for "garage queens".
    >
    > 6. Mileage is good, not bad for a Ferrari.
    > "1988 328GTS - only 1,500 miles" (GARAGE QUEEN). This car should have
    marks all over it
    > from ten foot poles. You will essentially have to rebuild the car and
    > still there will be surprises. Look for 5,000 miles a year average on
    > the car of your choice and a GOOD service record.
    >
    > 7. If you can find a Ferrari part it will be ex-pen-sive.
    > - A 328 windshield is over $2,000. Why? Because it's a FERRARI!
    >
    > 8. All Ferraris are red.
    > - Save the less common color schemes for your second or third example.
    > If you want to get out with your skin intact buy a "resale" red car.
    >
    > 9. Ferraris are like trophy wives, they are very expensive to keep.
    > - You don't hot rod a Ferrari because they are already hot rods as
    > they leave the factory. With high performance engines, they require
    > frequent service. A minor service is several thousand dollars every
    > 15,000 miles, A major service can be 5 - 10 thousand dollars, and more
    > if you have a 12 cylinder car. Every 30,000 miles. Really.
    >
    > 10. If you buy a Ferrari you will need another car as well.
    > - Unless you just love riding the subway.
    >
    > 11. Unless you have an F60/Enzo, someone faster is always out there, but
    > they are not having anywhere near as much fun.
    > - If you have never driven a Ferrari this may sound obscure. Beg,
    > borrow or steal one and drive it right. Your life will never be the
    > same.
    >
    >
    > -ken-
     
  12. To remove this ad click here.

  13. dickvandorm

    dickvandorm Rookie

    May 24, 2005
    36
    Olympia, WA. USA
    Full Name:
    Dick Pierson
    Where were you when I need you ??? Oh Ya, you were here and I didn't know about fchat until AFTER I got the car. Oh well, guess I will just have to suffer through Ferrari ownership and learn as I go. I have allowed for most of the ten items, except I haven't figured out yet what the budget is going to be to keep it going. I have two other vehicles (car & truck) so if I am down I am not stuck. But I bought it to drive it not to look at it, so hopefully I will have a good summer and enjoy each day with my Ferrari.

    I am still learning how to drive it however, I get different directions from different people. "Don't twist over 5000 RPM on a regular basis", "Shift at 5500 to 5900". "These cars are made to run, drive it, twist it, make it perform" My Oh My what is a guy to do? Have a great day !!
     
  14. Jdubbya

    Jdubbya Two Time F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 28, 2003
    24,057
    PNW
    Full Name:
    John
    Since were doing rules, here is my favorite....

    THE SIX LAWS OF ITALIAN SPORTS CARS


    As the owner of an Italian vehicle, you have undoubtedly found that,
    from time to time, the thing defies all known laws of Physics.
    Distinguished researchers from all over the world have spent entire
    lives trying to understand such phenomena. Recently, the Six Laws of
    Italian Sports Cars were discovered, thus reducing most owners'
    dependency on sorcerers and prayer, to keep such cars running.

    Careless application of these laws to any individual auto may fix the
    problems of the moment, but cause hives or allergies in said owners.


    1) THE LAW OF PLEASING DESIGN WHERE IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER
    "The inside of cam covers or other relatively innocuous areas, shall
    be laced with buttresses, cross-bracing and all manner of esoteric
    stiffness-with-lightness design, while something like connecting rods
    shall self-destruct at redline plus 1.0 rpm due to a basic lack of
    strength." An example of this Law is the stunningly beautiful
    Lamborghini or Ferrari V-12's of the late '60's. They were famous for
    wearing out all four camshafts in 10,000 miles or less. The cam's
    metal appeared to be recycled coat hangers, which coincidentally are
    still in short supply in Italy.


    2) THE LAW OF NON-FUNCTIONAL APPARATUS
    "All Italian Sports Cars, regardless of age, shall have at least one
    system or component which does not work, and cannot be repaired. Such a part shall never be mentioned in the Official Shop Manual, although
    there may be an out-of-focus picture shown." It goes without saying
    that such parts should never under any circumstances be removed, lest
    the natural balance of the car be upset.

    3)THE LAW OF ELECTRICAL CHAOS
    "All Italian Sports Cars shall be wired at the Factory by a
    cross-eyed, color-blind worker, using whatever supplies are within
    reach. All wires shall change color-code at least once between energy
    source and component. all grounds shall be partially insulated." This
    tends to guarantee that the owner of such vehicles will eventually be
    intimately familiar with its electrical system, since he will need to
    trace out each wire, then rewrite his Official Schematic, which will
    differ from all others in at least one area.


    4)THE LAW OF PERSONAL ABUSE
    "The more an Italian auto breaks down, the more endearing it becomes
    to its increasingly irrational owner." For example, you purchase an
    Italian Sports car, for all the money you ever hoped to earn, and
    receive a ticket for air pollution on the way home from the dealer due
    to the vast clouds of smoke that follow you. Several return trips to
    said dealer, accompanied by your rapidly dwindling cash reserves,
    cures the smoking. But now, the engine sounds like a food processor
    full of ball-bearings. After replacing every component in the car,
    including the radio speakers, the noise vanishes and is replaced by an
    odor reminiscent of a major fire in a goat-hair mattress factory. You
    still keep trying, God help you.


    5)THE LAW OF UNAVAILABLE PARTS
    "All parts of an Italian sports car shall be made of a material that
    is available in inverse proportion to its operating half-life." Thus,
    the speedometer hold-down screws are made of grade 8 cold rolled
    steel, while the valves are of fabricated Unobtanium, made only at
    midnight by an old man with a pointy hat covered with moons and stars.
    Such parts will be backordered during the design phase of the car, and
    will remain so forever. Bribes, pleading and threats will be ignored.

    6)THE LAW OF CRYPTIC INSTRUCTIONS
    "Any official publications dealing with repair, maintenance or
    operations of an Italian sports car, shall be written such that every
    fourth word is incomprehensible to the average American. In the event
    that a random sentence is understandable, its information shall be
    wrong." This is also known as flat-tire English, where a sentence
    flows along nicely, then-Kaboom!

    FORZA FERRARI

    Glad to hear you're getting it fixed Dick! I have had mine for just over a year and a half. It has been the most fun and at the same time the most frustrating car I have ever owned! I guess I'm really falling victim to rule #4 above huh? Hope to see you and your car out there soon!

    John
     
  15. Spasso

    Spasso F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Feb 16, 2003
    14,612
    Land of Slugs & Moss
    Full Name:
    Han Solo
    This is turning out to be a funny thread! Informative too.

    Start with 1.00 a mile for maintenence and go from there.




    How to drive it?

    The 3 liter is nothing more than two big 4 cylinder motorcycle engines hooked together. Not much torque in this equation. If you want power you need to rev it as required. If you are trying to catch up up with 360's, 355's and TR's you need to use ALL of the power which is at 6500 to 6800, well below redline. IT WON'T HURT IT to shift at this RPM for maximum performance, on the contrary, IT'S GOOD FOR IT.

    On the other hand if you are just putting around the neighborhood at 30 to 45 MPH on the flat there is no reason to shift any higher than 4k. You are just wearing out the engine if you make shifts at high RPM's without a need for power. As long as you don't lug the engine or bog it down lower shift points are okay. NOTE! The drawback to putting around is carbon buildup in the engine which brings me to the next subject........................

    "The Italian Tuneup"

    The best thing to do at least once EVERYTIME YOU DRIVE THE CAR is get on a freeway on-ramp or on an empty back road and run it through the gears under hard acceleration, shifting at 6500 to 6800 RPM to blow all of the crap out of the combustion chambers. Repeat as necessary (or desired:p).

    You don't have to beat your car to do this, shift carefully and go easy on the clutch. Your engine will run better afterwards, at least mine does. That is what they are designed to do.
     

Share This Page