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458 Coil over bottom mount nut stuck

Discussion in '458 Italia/488/F8' started by Tim gould sr, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. Solid State

    Solid State F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed Owner

    Feb 4, 2014
    6,076
    Full Name:
    Nosmo King
    Shock body should have threads cut into it and the whole unit should be adjustable and support revalve. Should be anodized as well (inside and out).
     
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  3. RayJohns

    RayJohns F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    May 21, 2006
    6,436
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    Ray Johns
    I agree there are probably better products for aluminum than WD40. I use a product called Safety Tap sometimes also.

    Here's an interesting test of some of the popular ones:



    As far as brushes, I usually have the best luck with gasoline, an old toothbrush and compressed air with aluminum. Brass is okay also. I use stainless brushes on aluminum prior to TIG welding.

    I know Ferrari was probably trying to save weight, but some good ol' fashioned steel to steel threads would have been nice. But maybe they know something I don't. It seems like the threads on that collar can be very temperamental for some people. I've even heard horror stories where Ferrari dealers have messed them up while attempting to lower customer cars.

    Ray
     
  4. Motob

    Motob Formula 3
    Professional Ferrari Technician

    Nov 11, 2003
    2,184
    Berkeley, CA
    Full Name:
    Brian Brown
    You cannot slide the sleeve past the circlip groove and off the bottom of the shock as the weld bead between the shock tube and the end eye is much larger than the inside diameter of the sleeve. If you were to grind the bead down so that the sleeve slid off, you would compromise the integrity of the weld possibly to the point of failure. You cannot slide the sleeve up off of the shock as the end cap of the shock is staked on. The only alternative is replacement of the shock.

    Brian Brown
    San Francisco Motorsports
     
  5. Corradosv

    Corradosv Karting

    Oct 17, 2016
    120
    Monaco MC
    Thanks Brian,
    if that will happen to me I will still try to break the collar, remove it in pieces and replace it with a new fixed one in 2 halves to be clamped on the strut instead of sliding it: after all I won't make things worse if the plan is sourcing a new shock...
    But your experience and advice helps, and thanks for sharing it!
     
  6. Baitschev

    Baitschev Formula Junior

    Jan 8, 2017
    260
    Vienna
    I have the same issues on my 458
    Remove the old spring.
    Cut the sticking nut carefully in two pieces but do Not cut so deep to the thred.
    Splitt it with strait Bit.and buy a new one by Dealer.
    Novitec send the nuts automatic with the spring set.
     
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  8. Tim gould sr

    Tim gould sr Rookie

    Jan 19, 2019
    32
    Full Name:
    timothy gould
    Thanks I will look into that. !


    Sent from my iPhone using FerrariChat
     
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  9. Corradosv

    Corradosv Karting

    Oct 17, 2016
    120
    Monaco MC
    This is another good idea. I was saying splitting and replacing the collar, but splitting just the nuts is a better idea, if they can be sourced separately.
     
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  10. RayJohns

    RayJohns F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    May 21, 2006
    6,436
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    Ray Johns
    I wanted to add something here just briefly...

    The other day, I was in the garage cutting some aluminum pipe threads into a thermostat housing for my pickup truck. So I drilled the hole to the proper size, then had to tap the hole with a rather large 3/8 NPT tap. You can imagine how much fun that is; just picture me in the garage basically with a huge wrench on the tap, arduously turning it 1/4 turn by 1/4 turn until my temperature sensor threads in far enough. I was never so happy to be done with a job in my life.

    Anyway, initially, I was lubricating the thread cutting process with some really great tapping oil that I routinely use for cutting stuff on the lathe, such as turning stainless steel and cutting it with carbide cutting bits, etc. It works great. However, what I noticed when I tried using it on aluminum was that it initially did an okay job, but as the tap got deeper, it started to gall and tear out some small portions of the threads it was cutting due to friction and force.

    So I don't think "soaking" the aluminum collar will help much, now that I think about it more - even if you were to use the proper liquid products.

    On my thermostat housing threading project, what I ended up having to do was lubricate the cutting process with anti-seize of all things. That worked beautifully, although it was horribly messy (anyone who uses much anti-seize around the shop knows it gets all over everything very quickly).

    Anyway, so anti-seize is probably going to be my new lubricating medium of choice when it comes to cutting aluminum threads from now on. I just wanted to pass that information along, in case it might help someone else when it comes to aluminum threads and/or Ferrari coilovers.

    A little anti-seize goes a long way in protecting aluminum threads.

    Ray
     
  11. Live2win

    Live2win Karting

    Sep 27, 2019
    94
    Pasadena MD
    Full Name:
    David perkins
    I recently contacted two Ferrari dealers about lowering my 458. Both said they would not do. Both said they learned they hard way things could go bad. As you have seen.
     
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  13. RayJohns

    RayJohns F1 Veteran
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    May 21, 2006
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    Ray Johns
    To really do it correctly, it takes some work and tends to be time consuming. In order to remove the coilovers, it takes a surprising amount of disassembly of the car. I don't think most people want to go through all that work to do the job right. Everyone wants to just slip a spanner in there and quickly make $1000+ for turning a nut and collar.

    You have to know what you are doing and pay close attention to details, otherwise things can go off the rails fast and in a very bad way.

    It helps to clean the threads with compressed air and a toothbrush. Some Wd40 as well. When I did mine, I setup the spanners so both the jam nut and collar loosened away from one another at the same time. This helps prevent possible cross-threading as things break free and move. When you tighten everything back down the threads need to be crystal clean.

    The top of the suspension assembly bolts back on the car via aluminum threads if I remember correctly. Torquing those down is somewhat nerve racking.

    This isn't a job you want some fumbling grease monkey doing on your car.

    I know of at least one Ferrari dealer out this direction that refuses to do it also, because they have had things go terribly wrong as well.

    Ray
     
  14. Corradosv

    Corradosv Karting

    Oct 17, 2016
    120
    Monaco MC
    Hi Ray,
    your post is informative and interesting as usual.
    You know I am considering the job and, as I am not sure I got what you mean by anti-seize (and then I have to look for something here in EU), may I ask you to clarify? Do you mean something like graphite or copper grease? Or what?
    Thanks as always.
     
  15. RayJohns

    RayJohns F1 Veteran
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    May 21, 2006
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    Ray Johns
    Yes, that's correct.

    I use it extensively when assembling motors, etc. - especially where aluminum threads are involved. The number one area I use it for is Titanium bolts that thread into aluminum holes.

    I wouldn't go crazy using it on the coilovers, but if you are worried about the aluminum threads, it can help out.

    Ray

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  16. Corradosv

    Corradosv Karting

    Oct 17, 2016
    120
    Monaco MC
    got it!
    Thanks Ray
     

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