News

Ferrari values

Discussion in 'Ferrari Discussion (not model specific)' started by Husker, May 22, 2020.

  1. Husker

    Husker F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 31, 2003
    7,944
    western hemisphere
    I have always been fascinated by watching the values of Ferraris and what they do over time. Well OK, all cars actually, but Ferraris in particular.

    In around 1979, my dad purchased a rusted out, but otherwise quite nice, 1963 250 GTE from a fellow a few blocks from us for $6000. My dad was in the middle of restoring it when my parents divorced. My mom was awarded the car in the divorce and promptly sold the car for $3,000. These cars are now in the deep into six figures $$$.

    In around 1980, my dad and I passed on a burgundy Dino here that was in decent shape for $14,000.

    In around 2001, I happened onto a local 1982 308 GTSi that I bought for $20K. That car was never quite correct, but fun nonethless. I sold it on eBay about a year later for $27K. I think the mid $40s and even higher is where these are at now.

    In the same year, I bought quite a nice 1990 348TS for $42K with a fresh service. I sold it for around the same money a year later. I think mid to high $50s is where these cars are now.

    In 2003, I bought a yellow 348TS for $37K that needed a major, so I was in that car for around $43K. I sold it a couple years later for $45.

    It is interesting that when I was looking at 348s in the high 30s and low 40s, a much newer 360 was in the $120K and up range. Now, the cars are close to even money.

    Ferraris are like aged wine. After a period of 20 years, they do nothing but go up in value. I think that's kind of cool.
     
    BT likes this.
  2. To remove this ad click here.

  3. BT

    BT F1 World Champ

    Mar 21, 2005
    14,625
    FL / GA
    Full Name:
    Bill Tracy
    Correct, and the 360 is such a different machine to the 348. Each car has its positives and negatives, but objectively I would say the 360 is superior. I would only go for a 348 today for even money if I was in love with the styling. As you may know, I had a 348 for many years. I was contemplating getting back into the Ferrari game recently, but chose to go out and get an Alfa 4C instead. If I would have bought a Ferrari, it almost certainly would have been a 360.
     
    Texas Forever likes this.
  4. Husker

    Husker F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 31, 2003
    7,944
    western hemisphere
    I really enjoyed the 348s, especially after I fixed the rear end with the Husker Grill. My first one I replaced the T/O bearing and a fuel pump. Both of those cars were really dependable.

    I really enjoyed the 308, but I was shocked at many aspects of poor workmanship on that car. Stuff would literally just fall apart without much provocation.
     
  5. BT

    BT F1 World Champ

    Mar 21, 2005
    14,625
    FL / GA
    Full Name:
    Bill Tracy
    The Alfa seems pretty stout, although last weekend after a few hours of aggressive driving a few little bolts fell out when we stopped. Not coincidentally, the rattling I have heard since I got the car disappeared. It is just what the car needed!
     
    Texas Forever likes this.
  6. Husker

    Husker F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 31, 2003
    7,944
    western hemisphere
    a few little bolts? :eek::D
     
  7. To remove this ad click here.

  8. BT

    BT F1 World Champ

    Mar 21, 2005
    14,625
    FL / GA
    Full Name:
    Bill Tracy
    They were about an inch long M8 bolts. Probably not too important. Glad the rattle is gone!
     
    Husker likes this.
  9. mchas

    mchas F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Oct 5, 2004
    4,768
    Los Angeles
    Full Name:
    Mark
    You can thank inflation for most of the run up since the 70s/80s. $6,000 was a lot of money back in 1979. Heck, my grandfather put $5,000 down on a 6 unit property a block from the beach back then and it’s now worth millions. The dollar has lost a lot of buying power in that time.
     
  10. thorn

    thorn F1 Rookie
    Silver Subscribed

    Aug 7, 2012
    2,730
    Tallahassee, FL
    Around 1981, my parents bought a 4000 sq ft house on 4 acres for around $80K. A Ferrari 308 was around $82K. I bought a 308 for less than $82K in 2017 dollars. Given the cost of ownership - ONLY in insurance - I've spent more than I could sell it for.

    There are certainly Ferraris that keep, or even exceed their original value, even accounting for inflation. But they are the exception, not the rule.
     
    ifeelfree0 likes this.
  11. Husker

    Husker F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 31, 2003
    7,944
    western hemisphere
    Then there's the Range Rover Sport I bought in 2015 for $79K, and traded it 3 years later for $37K. :eek:
     
    BMW.SauberF1Team likes this.
  12. To remove this ad click here.

  13. absent

    absent F1 Veteran
    Lifetime Rossa

    Nov 2, 2003
    8,432
    illinois
    Full Name:
    mark k.
    Your memory is a little bit off (no offense).
    In 1984 the 288GTO had MSRP of $85k, same year 308GTS was stickered at $60,495 and the options were no where near today's insanity.
     
  14. Husker

    Husker F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed

    Dec 31, 2003
    7,944
    western hemisphere
    Those cheap Dinos didn’t have many options. Goodness they were barely even Ferraris. :cool:
     
  15. EnzoItaly

    EnzoItaly Karting
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 29, 2016
    126
    Interesting, I thought the GTO was way more expensive back then: could you just walk in a Ferrari dealership and order a 288 GTO?
     

Share This Page