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General 330 P3/4 and vintage question

Discussion in 'Vintage (thru 365 GTC4)' started by scuderia47, Feb 10, 2004.

  1. scuderia47

    scuderia47 Karting

    Nov 5, 2003
    208
    Mainland
    Full Name:
    Bill
    Napolis, that P that you're restoring is absolutely amazing. im not sure if this has been brought up before, but i was wondering how "easy" it is to keep a vintage racer like that running. do you need a couple of people to get the car started and running before you can drive it around or track it? or can you just fire it up and take it around the block if you so pleased?

    also, what about an earlier car like a 250TR? what type of regular effort needs to be put into a car like that (considering that it doesnt need a restoration) to keep it running for regular use?

    thanks a lot everyone


    sorry i should have put this in the general vintage discussion, i dont know how to move it though
     
  2. Napolis

    Napolis Three Time F1 World Champ
    Owner Honorary

    Oct 23, 2002
    32,118
    Full Name:
    Jim Glickenhaus
    In general Vintage cars/race are very usable. There's a difference between say between 50ies era and 60ies era but they are both a blast to drive and while they require care and remembering that things like brakes are much different than modern cars they work and don't require a huge crew to keep going. They must be maintained. They have little/no rust proofing and race cars were built to race and tossed away. Legally 67, in the US, is really the cut off point as EPA and Safety requirements make it almost impossible to register a post 67 racecar.
    There's also a big difference between cars. All race cars need to be modified to run on the street. Lower gearing, rad fans, better batteries and charging systems, softer pads, etc but if your carefull it can be done in a non invasive and restorable way.
    My P4 is a bit more to start and run on the street than my MK-IV or my Lola.
    The 427 makes a ton of torque as does the Lola's smb chevy. On the street torque is what you need esp. to get rolling.
    The Ford is easy to start. Throw some switches, pump the pedal, and push the starter button.
    The P4 requires squirting raw fuel down the trumpets. Retarding the FI cam, switching on and building the fuel PSI to 125+lbs, starting, warming up, advancing (leaning) the FI cam, closing the tail and setting off.
    Cold it's a two man and a fire extinguisher job. Hot Maybe one can do it.
    My Duesy is 73 years old but it starts right up and is a real joy to drive. You can not forget however, that it weighs 7000 lbs. and that its HUGE.
    Best
     
  3. scuderia47

    scuderia47 Karting

    Nov 5, 2003
    208
    Mainland
    Full Name:
    Bill
    thank you, i am very intersted in owning a vintage racer sometime in the future, and i am also the type of person who, if possible, would drive a car like that as much as possible. so the daily driving aspect of a car is important to me. it sounds like starting up the P4 is just about as exciting as driving it!

    i saw a GT-40 (racer from the 60's not the new model) on a flat bed last summer, so when i saw the guy pull into a gas station i followed him in and talked to him about the car. apparently he flat beds it to shows and to an occasional track event. i just could help but be dissapointed that he didnt drive it on the road. so, Napolis, i recall reading that you drive your vintage racers on the road (which i give you so much respect and envy for), how often and how much mileage do you put on them? becuase if it was up to me, i would drive a 250TR to the grocery store everyday.
     
  4. Napolis

    Napolis Three Time F1 World Champ
    Owner Honorary

    Oct 23, 2002
    32,118
    Full Name:
    Jim Glickenhaus
    After you driven one you may change your mind.
    Over 14 years I've put about 20K miles on my MK-IV on the road.
    These are sunday drivers. Point to point with a thought out route and secure parking at your destination. They aren't really too much fun in bumper to bumper.
    In addition they're not really insurable as daily use vehicles.
     
  5. Horsefly

    Horsefly F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    May 14, 2002
    6,929

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