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Jumping rope question + Bellyfat and stationary bicycle question

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by DriveAfterDark, Jul 12, 2009.

  1. DriveAfterDark

    DriveAfterDark F1 Veteran

    Jan 1, 2007
    8,823
    Norway
    I have three questions, perhaps you guys can help:

    1) Is jumping rope any good? It's a lot of fun and I was wondering how jumping rope will affect the body. Is it good for the legs perhaps, and burns calories at the same time? I want more muscular legs and get rid of some fat as well.

    2) My workout plan is lifting weights for 45 minutes every second day (I'm a newbie). I also run 20 minutes at the end on a stationary bicycle after the workout. Can I bicycle every day to burn more fat, or is it better to keep going with the 45 min. workout + 20 min. bicycle plan? Some say it's pointless to work out the same muscles every day, because they need a day of rest, that's why I'm asking.

    3) When is it ideal to do sit-ups? During the workout session, before bed, right after standing up and so on?



    Thanks.
     
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  3. wax

    wax Four Time F1 World Champ
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    Jump rope kicks ass.

    ____________

    Sit ups = bad. Leg lifts = good.

    Lay on back, lift legs a bit - stay.

    Ah-ah-ahhhh! Stay!

    No cheating!

    Hey!
    ______

    Know what a Horse stance is?
     
  4. GatorFL

    GatorFL Moderator
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    I'm not an expert but I always do the cardio first, then hit the weights. I always start out on the abs/midsection once I hit the weights and machines and work up smaller muscles to larger ones.
     
  5. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    It's great. Very tough to do for more than a few minutes at a time as initially you're biomechanically inefficient. Roping gets much easier (and you go for long bouts) as your body learns how to execute the movements more efficiently (e.g. not jumping as high; using less tib anterior; etc).

    Cardio every day is fine. With strenuous resistance ex. you want rest between bouts for same muscle groups.


    Incorporate ab work into your workouts (anywhere) for your level of ex. Floorwork and other functional things are fine, no need for machines or any of that noise.
     
  6. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    #5 ducowti, Jul 13, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
    Not to pick on Gator, but for the avg exerciser this is backwards. Progression, in most cases, is ideally larger to smaller muscle groups (e.g. for back/biceps since the latter are synergists in back movements) so you maximize productivity of the larger group; doing biceps before lat pulldowns, for example, will prefatigue the biceps and make your pulldowns less productive w.respect to working lats since you can't move as much weight for that lift.
     
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  8. GatorFL

    GatorFL Moderator
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    I told ya I wasn't an expert! :)
     
  9. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    #7 ducowti, Jul 13, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
    Heh. And really, unless you're trying to build mass you needn't worry about order either. If you're simply trying to get some weights in for 'general fitness' either way is fine, although I will qualify that and tell you from a warmup standpoint you're still better off going larger > smaller since you'll warm up joints and connective tissue of those smaller muscles better doing larger-group exercises in which those smaller muscles are synergists. I.E. less chance of cold-use injury as when jumping right into heavy curls, for example.
     
  10. Evolved

    Evolved F1 Veteran

    Nov 5, 2003
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    Try weights before cardio. Makes your cardio harder for sure and you lift more weight.
     
  11. nthfinity

    nthfinity F1 Veteran

    Mar 21, 2005
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    why are sit ups bad?

    My abs/core are the strongest they've ever been because of my sit up routine!
    3 sets of 40 regular pased situps, immediately followed (no rest) by 20 rapid pace situps. (in the meantime, my regular pace is much faster than it used to be). It gets my heart going pretty good, a healthy sweat, and my abs are pretty hard (under the gut).
     
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  13. wax

    wax Four Time F1 World Champ
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  14. amenasce

    amenasce Two Time F1 World Champ
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    You crack me up !
     
  15. nthfinity

    nthfinity F1 Veteran

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    I know my great uncle used to do the same sit up routine, my dad and uncle both have done regular situps for decades +. .. Additionally, situps are part of the SEAL routine... I have zero back pain; and haven't had it since I was 9. I'll just ~think~ I have good genes :p Also; I would say that the situps have strengthened my lower back, as I couldn't really do good push ups (think banana... and lower back weakness) until I was well into my routine.

    http://www.military.com/military-fitness/army-workouts/army-fitness-workout-plan
     
  16. TexasF355F1

    TexasF355F1 Four Time F1 World Champ
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    Don't feel bad...I do the same. I'd rather leave the gym after lifting than do cardio.
     
  17. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    There's more than meets the eye here; the miliraty uses situps for certain reasons that the general public might not be interested in. Situps are practical and functional to be sure, but do carry a risk of low back and neck issues. For military personnel they're great, but not necessarily for a guy trying to develop a six pack - for him why does he need to work his hip flexors as in the 2nd half of a situp? That's my main beef w.situps anyway. Half the movement is 'wasted' on hip flexors. There are a lots better ab movements that don't 'waste' effort on other/non target muscle groups and that don't risk low back unhappiness.
     
  18. DriveAfterDark

    DriveAfterDark F1 Veteran

    Jan 1, 2007
    8,823
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    Thanks guys.

    ducowti:
    You seem pretty well informed in this; What do you recommend for the six pack, if not sit ups? Do you have any videos/gifs/pictures to show to? Thanks again.
     
  19. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    I'm an exercise physiologist (and actually had to work for my 6 pack unlike many genetically blessed bastards!) so I have the background; not everyone will agree w.my responses of course, but at least they're fundamentally sound.

    Men's Health (and similar) mags often have good ab movements not based on machines (which I think are mostly a waste, w.few exceptions) so browse those on the newstand. W.out getting into why, a crunch, IMO, is superior to a sit up. I don't have any good resources at the ready but there are plenty out there; try a google image or youtube search for 'abdominal crunch' or variations of that. Don't limit yourself to ab work in that one plane though - the abs are comprised of few sections so do multiplanar movements.

    But ab work is only 20% of the 'six pack' battle; the other 80% is diet and cardio. Subcutaneous fat is the issue and you can't spot reduce (i.e. selectively burn fat from a specific muscle group), so you have to do a lot of cardio and limit your junk food intake. Don't kill yourself doing ab work till you're blue in the face, b.c. that ain't the way to a six.

    To be succinct:
    -do ab floorwork (crunches, bicycles, or a hundred other exs., etc)
    -limit your junk food intake
    -do as intense cardio as you can bear (mentally/motivationally and physically) at least 3x/week

    Good luck!
     
  20. veyron407

    veyron407 Formula Junior

    Jun 1, 2008
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    You can do 1000+ sit ups a day for 20 years you wont see your abs unless you are down in bodyfat simple as that.
     
  21. nthfinity

    nthfinity F1 Veteran

    Mar 21, 2005
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    I've done some bicycles; but my coordination for that is currently pathetic. I'm def. not currently doing my exercise for 6 pack abs... as that goal is no less than 6 months away; and likely longer. Just doing it for a higher heart rate, and improved strength. I love calisthenic exercises and am not a gym kind of guy. I feel like I do need to add something more to what I do now; as I've plateaued somewhat in terms of weight lost [ went up 5 lbs, and now dropped it back in the last month with a total loss of 45 down from 284 ] , and general strength. I know that it's tough to build muscle at the same time as dropping weight...

    I guess that is a bit OT; but I'm curious as to the first bit you wrote about what the gen. public isn't interested in with sit ups.
     
  22. ducowti

    ducowti Formula 3

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    Losing weight and increasing mass are divergent goals. Body builders bulk up and then drop body fat pre-competition; they can't do both concurrently, nor can you.

    You don't need weights or a gym to lose weight and stay in shape, though if you're looking to increase mass you'll need resistance movements. Calisthenics are great, if you maintain the motiviation and discipline.

    My comment about the public (vis a vis, e.g., infantrymen) - the avg joe wants simply to be fit or look good, whereas an infantryman has more pressing functional considerations. I.E. while a situp may not be the best thing for sculpting a 6 pack for the effort, it remains a functional movement.
     

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