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Mold/Mildew in a storage area

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by REM9, Nov 20, 2003.

  1. REM9

    REM9 Karting

    Jun 17, 2001
    173
    Finger Lakes NY, USA
    Full Name:
    rem9
    Well, I suppose it was bound to happen given the weather. (Rain since March!) I have become aware of a problem in two of the cars in the collection developing mildew on the inner surfaces. I want to be sure to wipe out any chance of it spreading to the rest of the cars. Also kill it where it already has formed. The structure is 60' x 26' with a concrete floor, framed walls and steel roof. The walls and roof were sprayed with foam insulation. Finish on the walls is painted sheetrock and Luan plywood on the ceiling.
    My initial information indicates a chlorine solution needs to be used.

    Anyone have a similar experience or input? Structure has not had this problem for the past 5 years, only after all the rain this year. Located in central NY.
     
  2. Horsefly

    Horsefly F1 Veteran
    Rossa Subscribed

    May 14, 2002
    6,929
    How about a couple of dehumidifiers inside the garage? My friend has a small dehumidifier in his downstairs room which is about 30 by 20 feet. It will remove about 2 quarts of water from the air in a day or two. Might be worth buying a couple of those. They cost about $100 apiece. But just be advised that those small dehumidifiers are usually only designed to work in an air temperature above 60 degrees or so. They have a small refrigeration coil that condenses the moisture in the air, then the water drips off into a container. Below about 60 degrees, the temperature differential isn't enough to condense the moisture from the air. So they don't work great in COLD garages.
     
  3. jmillard308

    jmillard308 F1 Veteran
    Silver Subscribed Owner

    May 29, 2003
    5,688
    Perth West Oz
    Full Name:
    John Millard
    Mildew is a result of high humidity - will only survive in that environment.
    To remove from surfaces - chlorine (diluted) works, with a detergent helps.
    To prevent it happening, use a de-humidifier (ie air conditioner)
     
  4. 4re gt4

    4re gt4 Formula 3

    Apr 23, 2002
    2,279
    Roseburg, OR
    Full Name:
    Hans E. Hansen
    Lysol is very good for getting rid of it (used as a "factory fix" for GM cars with mildew inside the A/C system), but if your high moisture environment continues, it'll just come back.
     
  5. thecarreaper

    thecarreaper F1 World Champ
    Silver Subscribed

    Sep 30, 2003
    15,227
    Savannah
    Full Name:
    name
    dehumidifiers outside the car ( ditto what the others said) i also take a box of baking soda and put it flat on its side with a FEW! small holes in it and place it in a flat pan or something( for inside the car). it absorbs odors and moisture, silca gel may work great too but you must first reduce the amount of water vapor in the air outside the car. hope this helps i hate mold/mildue!
     
  6. stevew

    stevew Formula 3

    Jun 9, 2002
    1,837
    uk
    Full Name:
    Steve
    When you have cleaned up your cars,put them in Carcoons.
    You won't have any more mildew,condensation etc.They will come out as fresh as when you put them in.

    Steve
     
  7. Dopplemax

    Dopplemax Formula 3

    Cleaning mold off of semi-porous surfaces is best accomplished using either a 10% bleach to water solution or simply water and detergent. The use of bleach is intended to act as a surfactant (makes water wetter), it isn't intended to act as a biocide. Physical removal of the mold is your only objective. Simply applying a chemical may inactivate some of the organisms' ability to colonize, but once sufficient moisture is availible, it will return.

    The long term solution is eliminate the conditions allowing moisture to condense on the affected surface(s). This can be accomplished via dehumidifcation, use of a low-grain dehumidifier will extend it's operable season. The alternative is to increase the surface temperature of the condensation surface.

    Long term management of excessive moisture may be accomplished via an air to air heat exchanger properly sized and selected for your meteorological conditions. Our firm has designed dozens of them for car collection storage.

    Ultimately, keeping the moisture source out is the best solution, cleaning up mold, installing portable dehu's etc. are "band-aids". You have to resolve the thermal and moisture conditions unique to your location.

    PM me if you need help!
     

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