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Questions before purchasing a 2011 458

Discussion in '458 Italia/488/F8' started by Ted63, Sep 16, 2020.

  1. Ted63

    Ted63 Rookie

    Sep 16, 2020
    3
    Full Name:
    Ted Kokas
    I am considering purchasing a 2011 458 Italia and had a couple of questions for the board:

    I understand that the 2010-2011s had a potential issue with the transmission software that was corrected with the 2012s. The car I am considering does not have a record of the software being updated, should this have been done or are the older cars only updated if a transmission problem occurs?

    Secondly, I understand that the 2011-2012s had a potential crankshaft issue. There is also no record of any crankshaft repair/modification. Was this only done on specific cars or were all the cars of those model years recalled?

    Are there any other questions/issues you suggest I discuss with the dealership prior to purchase? The vehicle is being sold through a Ferrari dealership so I am sure any issues can be resolved prior to the sale.

    Thank you!
     
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  3. Il Co-Pilota

    Il Co-Pilota F1 Rookie
    Rossa Subscribed

    May 29, 2019
    2,787
    Copenhagen
    Full Name:
    A.B
    How many km on the car? If it has run well since new and still does, it will most likely continue to do so. I'd be more worried if it was a low mileage garage queen. Just get the dealer to do all the updates, that should not pose a problem. You can of course purchase a warranty as well if that will make you sleep better at night.
     
  4. Carbonless

    Carbonless Rookie

    Oct 27, 2019
    8
    San Diego
    This. I bought a 2011 from the dealership w/ 20k miles and was told that if there were no issues yet than there would only be a very small chance of future issues.


    Sent from my iPhone using FerrariChat.com mobile app
     
  5. greyboxer

    greyboxer F1 World Champ

    Dec 8, 2004
    10,845
    South East
    Full Name:
    Jimmie
    Look back thro previous threads - my recollection is the crank was an issue on early primarily European cars and was sorted by a recall - the software upgrade has almost certainly been done as most seem to have been - the upgrade killed the pops on overrun so its easy to confirm - a PPI and/or call to FNA (or your local importer) will confirm recall status - for any other issues just look up one of the many 458 buying advice threads
     
  6. IloveGT

    IloveGT Formula 3

    Oct 17, 2015
    1,100
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  8. Ted63

    Ted63 Rookie

    Sep 16, 2020
    3
    Full Name:
    Ted Kokas
  9. AlfistaPortoghese

    AlfistaPortoghese Moderator
    Moderator

    Mar 18, 2014
    3,729
    Europe, but not by much.
    Full Name:
    Nuno
    I’d humbly recommend not to be put off by a 2010-2011 Italia.

    I was once a believer in the urban myth that pre-2012 Italias were somehow more prone to failures (namely DCT failures)... Until I spoke to my local Ferrari official dealer for 5 minutes about it and looked around: from 2009 Californias to 2015 F12s and everything in between were there with DCT issues at one point in time or another.

    In the end, it’s a mechanical component. Although pretty surdy IMVHO for a supercar, it can fail. It has, and it will continue to fail. I think if it weren’t for the hefty pricetag of the repair(s), and a transmission failing in a car wouldn’t be news at all. The fact that a failure gets attention is a testimony of how reliable it is. There are far more inspiring stories than sorry tales.

    If one approaches the transmission failure reports in post-2008 cars, Italias included, and studies it from a scientific standpoint, it will be very difficult to pinpoint failures to one simple variable alone like model year.

    Same applies to the turbo failures reported in the 488. It can happen across the range, regardless of year of manufacture. Fact remains it’s a solid, reliable car, not diminished in any way by a potential failure that is very common in any car. Better things to worry about.

    Kind regards,

    Nuno.
     

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