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Steering wheel socket DIY

Discussion in 'Technical Q&A' started by yelcab, Jan 12, 2004.

  1. yelcab

    yelcab F1 World Champ
    Consultant

    Nov 29, 2001
    10,718
    San Carlos, CA
    Full Name:
    Mitchell Le
    Has anyone had luck grinding / making a socket for this steering wheel nut? If so, what size?

    I had good success grinding a 1 3/8 socket to fit the 4 point tranny input shaft nut (the outter one). I had to buy the Baum socket for the timing gear drives. Neither of these sockets fit the steering wheel nut.
     
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  3. KurtK328

    KurtK328 Formula Junior

    Mar 6, 2001
    347
    Villeneuve-Loubet, France
    Full Name:
    Kurt Kjelgaard
    Try this one, Yelcab:
    http://www.ferrarichat.com/discus/messages/256120/2218.html
     
  4. rjdavatar

    rjdavatar Rookie

    Nov 17, 2003
    36
    Zurich, Switzerland
    The 308QV steering is held on a taper by a 38mm ring-nut.
    A friend quickly milled a tool for me (see figs).
    He used 40mm OD, 32mm ID aluminium tube, and milled out the 4 spiggots, which enage the ring nut, on end of the tube; and a hex head, suitable for engagement with a hex socket, on the other end. The spiggots are 4.5mm wide, and the diameter between the inner surfaces of two facing spiggots is 34mm.

    It was easy to remove the ringnut using the ringnut tool, engaged in a socket, and driven by a torque wrench. I noticed that the ringnut was torqued only to about 7 kg-m, rather than the 14 kg-m specified by the QV/328 manual. Just as well, because the teeth of the aluminium ringnut tool would probably have distorted at that high torque.

    Notice that the tube has a concavity milled into it (beneath the level of the spiggots) to accommodate the convexity of the ring-nut. Its upper surface is rather higher than the level of the where the spiggots engage.

    With the ringnut removed, I tried to dislodge the steering wheel by upward pressure with my knees, while rocking the wheel to and fro across 9 o'clock- 3 o'clock. No chance of dislodging it that way. I was unable to obtain a steering wheel puller that could engage into the 5mm threads of the alan screws that hold the Momo steering wheel down onto its hub. Instead, I used the general purpose three-arm puller (Kukko 3-arm combination puller model 203-1, www.kukko.com , cost CHF 105) shown in the figure below. The arms of the puller hooked behind the metal flange that the Momo wheel makes around its hub. Using this tool, the steering wheel was easily released, parting from it's seat on the stearing shaft with a pistol-shot bang!
     
  5. yelcab

    yelcab F1 World Champ
    Consultant

    Nov 29, 2001
    10,718
    San Carlos, CA
    Full Name:
    Mitchell Le
    Wish I had a friend with a Bridgeport Mill.
     
  6. rjdavatar

    rjdavatar Rookie

    Nov 17, 2003
    36
    Zurich, Switzerland
    the puller
     
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  8. rjdavatar

    rjdavatar Rookie

    Nov 17, 2003
    36
    Zurich, Switzerland
    thats true!

    but I think that one could make a good try with a hacksaw and grinder,
    and then drill a hole through the back end for a tommy bar
     
  9. joeyy

    joeyy Karting

    Nov 11, 2003
    190
    long island
    Full Name:
    joe
    i made a socket with a 1 3/4 socket cut the appropriate slots and fitted them with square stock that fit the holes next was a quick weld job and voila' it works great.
     
  10. Steve King

    Steve King F1 Rookie

    Feb 15, 2001
    4,366
    NY
    I went out and bought a cheap 1 3/4 deep socket and ground the 4 pins on my bench grinder. Looks rough but it works. Then I used a Sears steering wheel puller to remove the SW. It took me 20 mins to grind the socket and 5 mins to take the wheel off.
     
  11. 1975gt4don

    1975gt4don Formula Junior

    Nov 5, 2003
    662
    Peoples Rep of CA
    Full Name:
    Smog Exempt
    Yelcab, give me a hollar, I will sell you my wheel puller socket cheap. Bought it from GT Carparts years ago.


     
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